BREAKING: Property developers banned from issuing ‘mini bonds’ to raise cash

first_imgHome » News » BREAKING: Property developers banned from issuing ‘mini bonds’ to raise cash previous nextRegulation & LawBREAKING: Property developers banned from issuing ‘mini bonds’ to raise cashShock announcement by Financial Conduct Authority today follows complaints over opaque and complex nature of mini bonds.Nigel Lewis26th November 201901,801 Views Property developers will longer be able to finance themselves  by issuing mini bonds following this morning’s announcement by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) that it has banned their sale for a year while it consults on more permanent measures.Mini bonds are ‘IOUs’ that companies issue in return for a fixed annual return, usually at attractive net interest rates of up to 15% per annum.A burgeoning market in this type of risky and unregulated financial instrument has grown up in recent years, particularly via online crowd-funding platforms and ‘specialist’ property investment sites, because they face looser regulation than other types of investment.ScamsFor the same reason the FCA says this type of mini bond is also increased used as a front for scams and frauds.Whether legitimate or not, they offer small investors the opportunity to buy into property companies indirectly rather than investing in specific properties or developments, usually through a tax-free wrapper such as an ISA. The ban covers the sales of these bonds to the public via ‘retail’ websites and investment companies; high net worth and more experienced will still be able to invest in them.Mini bonds have been a particularly popular way for developers to raise funds to purchase and develop properties without having to be too specific about what investors are putting their cash into.The FCA refers to these kinds of mini-bonds as ‘the more complex and opaque investments’ although they can still be issued for investment in individual properties.Andrew Bailey, Chief Executive of the FCA (left) said: “We remain concerned at the scope for promotion of mini-bonds to retail investors who do not have the experience to assess and manage the risks involved.“This risk is heightened by the arrival of the ISA season at the end of the tax year, since it is quite common for mini-bonds to have ISA status, or to claim such even though they do not have the status.”“Although there are currently restrictions on the marketing of unlisted mini-bonds to retail customers, the FCA has increasingly been taking Enforcement action and finding that mini-bonds are being sold to retail investors for whom they are wholly unsuitable,” says Sushil Kuner, principal associate at law firm Gowling WLG.“Tightening up of the FCA’s financial promotion rules in this area and the FCA’s commitment to launch a consumer awareness campaign around the risks for investors should help prevent mini-bonds from being sold to lower income savers and investors.”The ban is to start on 1st January 2020. Read more about FCA regulations.property mini bonds Andrew Bailey FCA Financial Conduct Authority November 26, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Cardinal Timothy Dolan reflects on Notre Dame’s role in Catholicism

first_imgAt the University Commencement Ceremony on May 19, Cardinal Timothy Dolan said Notre Dame students strive for “not just a degree, but discipleship.” In an interview with The Observer on May 22, Dolan said discipleship requires being “intensely dedicated to the intellectual apostolate.” “What it is is a return to the old scholastic maxim from St. Thomas Aquinas that … what we do flows from who we are,” Dolan said. “If we are first and foremost an overtly Catholic institution with no apologies for our Catholic mission and Catholic identity, then a very rigorous academic identity will flow from that.” Contrary to what some people say, Dolan said the terms “Catholic” and “university” are compatible. “The crusaders of secularism would have us believe that the term ‘Catholic university’ is an oxymoron,” he said. “One of the reasons that I love Notre Dame and other Catholic universities … is that if you believe that ‘Catholic’ and ‘university’ can’t go together in the same phrase, come to Notre Dame.” Dolan said because young people are in a formative stage, all disciplines and modes of thinking, including that of faith, are relevant to them. “We actually think when you have an openness to the beyond … you’re going to be a more liberal person than ever, in the classical sense of the word,” Dolan said. “Those who say, ‘I want to be open; I don’t want to go to a university where the faith is obvious,’ … they’re closed to the faith, aren’t they? … They’re really the close-minded ones.” A Catholic university must acknowledge all points of view while maintaining its basis in Catholicism, Dolan said. “A university is always open to probing, criticisms, questions, getting the other view, because that’s part of the pursuit of truth, … with the utter conviction that the conclusion that we reach is going to be consonant with the faith,” Dolan said. Dolan said “prudential judgments” must be made when a Catholic university such as Notre Dame considers whom to invite to speak at an event such as Commencement. “When a university stands for something, even though it says, ‘All are welcome,’ what you’re saying is, ‘You’re welcome to a community that cherishes that identity,’” Dolan said. “For instance, if the leader of the Ku Klux Klan wanted to come speak [at Notre Dame], … I’m sure everybody would agree that’s not consonant with our values. If the leader of the [National Rifle Association] wanted to come to speak, I would guess it would be a prudential judgment. It was a prudential judgment when [President Barack Obama] came to speak four years ago.” As an institution of higher learning that considers itself “the nation’s preeminent Catholic university,” Notre Dame must spread Catholicism by teaching theology and philosophy, executing service projects and maintaining an atmosphere of faith, Dolan said. “We often say that faith is not so much taught as caught,” he said. “This happens, I would contend, at Notre Dame. The faith, yeah, it’s taught in the classroom, yeah, it’s evident in our service projects, but it’s also just a very, very beautiful, tangible part of the climate, of the atmosphere, of Notre Dame. “When you’ve got the Blessed Sacrament there in every student residence, when you’ve got a priest who lives in every student residence, we’ve … got hundreds of kids every day just whispering a quick prayer at the Lord’s Grotto, … there is an atmosphere at Notre Dame that somebody absorbs, somebody picks up, somebody catches.” Dolan said the University promotes a positive approach to faith, learning, service, friendship and country. He said Notre Dame is “a big ‘yes’ to the faith.” “[Faith is] taught well and it’s practiced well in the service projects,” he said. “But it’s caught in the liturgy, in the sacraments, in the friendships with people who share your values. … And I think that’s what a [Catholic] university is all about.”,At the University Commencement Ceremony on May 19, Cardinal Timothy Dolan said Notre Dame students strive for “not just a degree, but discipleship.” In an interview with The Observer on May 22, Dolan said discipleship requires being “intensely dedicated to the intellectual apostolate.” “What it is is a return to the old scholastic maxim from St. Thomas Aquinas that … what we do flows from who we are,” Dolan said. “If we are first and foremost an overtly Catholic institution with no apologies for our Catholic mission and Catholic identity, then a very rigorous academic identity will flow from that.” Contrary to what some people say, Dolan said the terms “Catholic” and “university” are compatible. “The crusaders of secularism would have us believe that the term ‘Catholic university’ is an oxymoron,” he said. “One of the reasons that I love Notre Dame and other Catholic universities … is that if you believe that ‘Catholic’ and ‘university’ can’t go together in the same phrase, come to Notre Dame.” Dolan said because young people are in a formative stage, all disciplines and modes of thinking, including that of faith, are relevant to them. “We actually think when you have an openness to the beyond … you’re going to be a more liberal person than ever, in the classical sense of the word,” Dolan said. “Those who say, ‘I want to be open; I don’t want to go to a university where the faith is obvious,’ … they’re closed to the faith, aren’t they? … They’re really the close-minded ones.” A Catholic university must acknowledge all points of view while maintaining its basis in Catholicism, Dolan said. “A university is always open to probing, criticisms, questions, getting the other view, because that’s part of the pursuit of truth, … with the utter conviction that the conclusion that we reach is going to be consonant with the faith,” Dolan said. Dolan said “prudential judgments” must be made when a Catholic university such as Notre Dame considers whom to invite to speak at Commencement. “When a university stands for something, even though it says, ‘All are welcome,’ what you’re saying is, ‘You’re welcome to a community that cherishes that identity,’” Dolan said. “For instance, if the leader of the Ku Klux Klan wanted to come speak [at Notre Dame], … I’m sure everybody would agree that’s not consonant with our values. If the leader of the [National Rifle Association] wanted to come to speak, I would guess it would be a prudential judgment. It was a prudential judgment when [President Barack Obama] came to speak four years ago.” As an institution of higher learning that considers itself “the nation’s preeminent Catholic university,” Notre Dame must spread Catholicism by teaching theology and philosophy, executing service projects and maintaining an atmosphere of faith, Dolan said. “We often say that faith is not so much taught as caught,” he said. “This happens, I would contend, at Notre Dame. The faith, yeah, it’s taught in the classroom, yeah, it’s evident in our service projects, but it’s also just a very, very beautiful, tangible part of the climate, of the atmosphere, of Notre Dame. “When you’ve got the Blessed Sacrament there in every student residence, when you’ve got a priest who lives in every student residence, we’ve … got hundreds of kids every day just whispering a quick prayer at the Lord’s Grotto, … there is an atmosphere at Notre Dame that somebody absorbs, somebody picks up, somebody catches.” Dolan said the University promotes a positive approach to faith, learning, service, friendship and country. He said Notre Dame is “a big ‘yes’ to the faith.” “[Faith is] taught well and it’s practiced well in the service projects,” he said. “But it’s caught in the liturgy, in the sacraments, in the friendships with people who share your values. … And I think that’s what a [Catholic] university is all about.”last_img read more

Peru To Use Sports To Counter Guerrillas, Drug Traffickers

first_imgBy Dialogo September 30, 2009 The Peruvian government plans to spend $866,000 to build sports facilities in the strife-torn Valley of the Apurimac and Ene rivers, known as the VRAE region, where drug traffickers and the so-called “remnants” of the Shining Path guerrilla group operate, officials said. The goal is to expand the state’s presence in the region, where additional army troops have been deployed to bolster security. A total of 15 sports complexes will be built in Ayacucho, Cuzco and Junin provinces, offering facilities for indoor soccer, volleyball, basketball, a running track and stands with the capacity to hold 300 spectators. Arrangements are being made with officials in several areas to construct the sports complexes with the army’s assistance and at a cost of 2.6 million nuevos soles ($866,000), Peruvian Sports Institute, or IPD, president Arturo Woodman told RPP radio Tuesday. Half of the funds will come from the IPD, with the remainder of the money being provided by the municipalities selected to receive a sports facility. Woodman traveled on Tuesday to Ayacucho to visit the districts where the sports complexes will be constructed. He will travel from there to Cuzco and Junin. The Shining Path has been blamed for an increase in violence in Peru’s interior in recent months. The guerrilla group has a presence in both the Upper Huallaga Valley and the VRAE region. The Upper Huallaga Valley is a center of coca cultivation and cocaine production. The guerrilla group’s remnants operate in both valleys, working with drug traffickers and staging attacks on the security forces. The Maoist-inspired Shining Path launched its uprising on May 17, 1980, with an attack on Chuschi, a small town in Ayacucho province. A truth commission appointed by former President Alejandro Toledo blamed the Shining Path for most of the nearly 70,000 deaths the panel ascribed to politically motivated violence during the two decades following the group’s 1980 uprising. The guerrilla group also caused an estimated $25 billion in economic losses, according to commission estimates. Founder Abimael Guzman, known to his fanatic followers as “President Gonzalo,” was captured with his top lieutenants on Sept. 12, 1992, an event that marked the “defeat” of the insurgency. Guzman, who was a professor of philosophy at San Cristobal University before initiating his armed struggle in the Andean city of Ayacucho, once predicted that 1 million Peruvians would probably have to die in the ushering-in of the new state envisioned by Shining Path. The group became notorious for some of its innovations, such as blowing apart with dynamite the bodies of community service workers its members killed, or hanging stray canines from lampposts as warnings to “capitalist dogs.” The Shining Path’s remnants did not comply with Guzman’s order more than a decade ago to end the armed struggle, and he does not recognize them as members of the group.last_img read more

Rigid rural regulation

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PREMIUMAll England kick offs with intensified battle for Tokyo spots

first_imgGoogle Linkedin COVID-19 or not, the oldest badminton tournament, the All England, will kick off on Wednesday, and players will be keen to secure Olympic points before qualifiers for Tokyo 2020 end next month.Indonesia’s mixed doubles pair of Hafiz Faizal and Gloria Emanuelle Widjaja is on a mission to gain as many points as possible, especially because some other tournaments prior to the Birmingham tournament, like the German Open, were cancelled because of the coronavirus outbreak.Hafiz and Gloria currently sit in 8th place in the Race to Tokyo ranking. Their position is not safe yet, as their lead in points over other pairs, such as Malaysia’s Goh Soon Huat and Shevon Jemie Lai and Hong Kong’s Tang Yung Man and Tse Ying Suet, is narrowing.Indonesian mixed doubles coach Richard Mainaky explained where the bar was for Hafiz and Gloria at the All England to keep their Olymp… Log in with your social account Forgot Password ? all-england Hendra-Setiawan-Mohammad-Ahsan Hafiz-Faizal-Gloria-Emanuelle-Widjaja badminton Tokyo-Olympics COVID-19 LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Topics : Facebooklast_img read more

Strathclyde returns 13.4% on strength of equity holdings

first_imgStrathclyde Pension Fund (SPF), the UK’s largest local government pension scheme, with £15.8bn (€22.1bn) in assets, made a 13.4% investment return for the year to 31 March.This compares with 13% for the benchmark and 8% for the previous year, and brings average annualised returns for the past five years to 8.6%.Within the equity allocation, the best performers were Japanese stocks, which returned 31%, and North American (23.7%) and Pacific ex Japan (18.6%) equities.The private equity portfolio made gains of 14.8%. The best-performing fixed income class was UK index-linked Gilts, which made 21.1%, compared with UK Gilts (13.9%) and UK corporate bonds (13.1%).Absolute return strategies within fixed income returned 3.3%, while the property portfolio made a return of 17.9%.At end-March 2015, equities made up 74.6% of the portfolio (compared with a strategic benchmark of 72.5%), while 12.2% was in bonds (underweight the 15% benchmark), 10.6% in property (compared with the 12.5% benchmark) and 2.5% in cash.The report on short to medium-term investment performance said: “Global equity markets have performed well relative to bond markets in recent years, so the fund’s equity bias has helped performance, and absolute performance over all periods has been strong. Property markets have also seen a period of recovery.”But it added: “Underperformance by some equity managers and the cost of turnaround and build-up of the fund’s property portfolio has detracted from returns over the five-year period.”SPF, administered by Glasgow City Council, is 94.3% funded, according to the latest triennial revaluation.The Council’s pensions committee is currently reviewing the fund’s investment strategy.Four alternative strategies are under consideration to improve downside risk, produce more efficiency and improve confidence in reaching the funding target.In the interim, SPF is working towards a target allocation of 5% for its new opportunities portfolio, which includes infrastructure, finance and alternatives.Four new commitments approved in June include two wind funds, and private debt and trade credit funds.last_img read more

ESG roundup: Robeco to pilot satellite imagery use

first_img“The ESA’s Sentinel-1 satellite, launched in 2014 as part of the Copernicus scientific programme, is so powerful it can pinpoint and precisely ‘photograph’ pieces of land five meters in diameter through the clouds,” said Robeco in a statement.The asset manager said the data can be used to engage with plantation owners, traders, intermediaries and other actors in the supply chain, as well as to alert authorities of any criminal activity.Peter van der Werf, engagement specialist at Robeco, said: “Building on the annual benchmark of palm oil companies as published by the Zoological Society of London’s Sustainability Policy Transparency Toolkit, which we use in our engagement programme, this project now gives us the ability to develop real time monitoring of the palm oil companies’ commitments to no deforestation.”Addressing sustainability issues in the palm oil industry is a major engagement theme for Robeco this year.Read MoreViewpoint: Spatial finance has a key role to playBen Caldecott, founding director of the Oxford Sustainable Finance Programme and an associate professor at the University of Oxford, sets out how geospatial data can help foster sustainable finance‘Engagement’s not a one-off’ Carola van Lamoen, head of active ownership at Robeco, talks to IPE’s Liam KennedyPRI launches tool to query academic ESG researchThe Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) has launched a tool allowing users to identify and access academic papers on different topics related to the broad topic of ESG.The Academic ESG Review tool allows users to query a database of more than 900 papers on responsible investment themes, grouped into categories such as asset pricing, climate regulation, “return on ESG”, and tax regulation.The PRI emphasised that the tool is continuously evolving, and encouraged feedback on any papers listed or suggestions for additions, as well as feedback about how people were using the tool.Information about the tool can be found here.Charity fund manager forges modern slavery allianceCharity fund manager CCLA has launched an initiative aiming to build a coalition of investors keen to contribute to the eradication of modern day slavery.According to the CCLA, the initiative – Find It, Fix It, Prevent It – will feature representation from the Investment Association, the PRI, the Business and Human Rights Centre, the University of Nottingham’s Rights Lab, and Rathbone Investment Management.Investors joining the coalition commit to, over the three years, engage with companies in their portfolios “to develop better policies, processes and procedures for identifying then addressing modern slavery in their supply chains”.They would also promote public policy that incentivises companies to report on the effectiveness of their actions to identify and then eradicate modern slavery, and contribute to the development of knowledge about how companies can combat the problem.James Corah, head of ethical and responsible investment at CCLA, said: “We believe that slavery exists somewhere in the supply chain of nearly every company.“Good companies are those that find, and then support, victims of slavery. Sadly, there are not yet enough of them and we, as an industry, have to do everything we can to encourage better action.”Modern slavery refers to forced or compulsory labour, people living in servitude, and human trafficking. Robeco will be piloting the use of satellite imagery data to check if palm oil producers are sticking to their commitments regarding deforestation.The asset manager has signed a letter of intent to collaborate Satelligence, a Dutch company that accesses data from imagery taken by satellites orbiting 700km above south-east Asia, west Africa, and central and south America.It will be the first time Robeco uses satellite imagery for any purpose, a spokeswoman told IPE.The data Satelligence accesses comes from satellites operated by the European Space Agency (ESA), the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency and NASA.last_img read more

Traugott stampedes again at Dodge City

first_imgCole Traugott raced from the fourth row in repeating as the winner of Dodge City Raceway Park’s IMCA Modified Stampede special. (Photo by Lonnie Wheatley)By Lonnie WheatleyDODGE CITY, Kan. (May 6) – Cole Traugott continues to hold the hot hand in IMCA Modifieds at Dodge City Raceway Park, rallying from the fourth row to take the $1,200 winner’s share in Satur­day night’s fifth annual Modified Stampede.Already on the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot, Traugott notched his second Modified Stam­pede win in a row and his eighth win in his last eight visits to Dodge City.In the 30-lap main event, Traugott took advantage of a pair of cautions in the opening half of the race to maneuver into the lead for keeps.“If it weren’t for the cautions, I’m not sure if I would have found it,” Traugott said in victory lane.  “That middle lane cleaned up some and I guess I was the first one to find it.  This car was working perfect.”While Traugott managed to climb from eight to fourth in the opening handful of laps, the chances of continuing his Dodge City domination seemed slim as he trailed the lead duo of Randy Wilson and Clay Sellard by a full straightaway and third-runner Austin Walker by a half-straight.But when the first caution flew after 11 laps for a turn two spin, Traugott pounced on Walker for third and gave chase to the lead duo.A second and final caution flew four rounds later, with Traugott once again taking advantage by battling past Sellard on the high side on the 16th round and then working his way around Wilson for the lead on the 17th lap.Traugott stretched it out over the ensuing rounds, with Sellard working his way past Wilson for second by the 22nd round.  Traugott was too far gone though, taking the checkered flag nearly a half straightaway ahead of Sellard with Wilson settling for third.Austin Walker took fourth with David Murray working his way up from tenth to round out the top five.Other feature winners were Angel Munoz in the IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars, Duane Wahrman in the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks and Dakota Sproul in the IMCA SportMods;Feature results – 1. Cole Traugott; 2. Clay Sellard; 3. Randy Wilson; 4. Tanner Black; 5. David Murray Jr.; 6. Nick Link; 7. Chris Bragg; 8. Ryan Heger; 9. Dale Wanger; 10. Kevin Gray; 11. Jer­emy Chambers; 12. Trent Gray; 13. Mike Lunow; 14. Tom Beavers; 15. Jack Kirchoff; 16. Kale Beavers; 17. Jessie Hoskins; 18. Chris Dawson; 19. David Solberg.last_img read more

Detroit seeks revenge on Youngstown St.

first_img Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditYoungstown State (14-11, 7-5) vs. Detroit (6-19, 4-8)Calihan Hall, Detroit; Thursday, 7 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Youngstown State goes for the season sweep over Detroit after winning the previous matchup in Youngstown. The teams last met on Jan. 11, when the Penguins shot 41.2 percent from the field on their way to the two-point victory. February 12, 2020 DID YOU KNOW: Detroit has made 8.8 3-pointers per game as a team this year, which is most among Horizon teams.___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com Associated Press center_img TEAM LEADERSHIP: Detroit’s Antoine Davis has averaged 23 points and 4.6 assists while Justin Miller has put up 10.4 points and 5.3 rebounds. For the Penguins, Darius Quisenberry has averaged 15.9 points and four assists while Naz Bohannon has put up 10.6 points and 8.5 rebounds.DEFENSIVE IMPROVEMENTS: The Titans have allowed just 74.8 points per game across 12 conference games, an improvement from the 80.9 per game they allowed to non-conference competition.OFFENSIVE THREAT: Davis has been directly responsible for 56 percent of all Detroit field goals over the last three games. The sophomore guard has 23 field goals and 18 assists in those games.SHARING THE BURDEN: Youngstown State is a perfect 5-0 when at least four of its players score 10 or more points. The team is 9-11 when fewer than four Penguins players score in double-figures.STREAK STATS: Youngstown State has lost its last three road games, scoring 69.7 points, while allowing 83 per game. Detroit seeks revenge on Youngstown St.last_img read more

Badgers riding momentum

first_imgBRYAN FAUST/Herald photoThe University of Wisconsin women’s hockey team, still riding a 16-game winning streak dating back to last season, has once again started the season off strong.The Badgers hope to carry momentum from two season-opening sweeps on the road as they will play visitor for the first time this season in this weekend’s series at Ohio State.The No. 1 Badgers (4-0-0) have won their first four home games against Quinnipiac and St. Cloud State but will be tested this weekend by a Buckeyes team that has shown offensive firepower early on in the season.Ohio State (2-0-0) tied a school record, scoring 16 total goals in their two game-opening series against Northeastern last weekend. The Buckeyes were an impressive 7-12 on power plays in their first two games, a number Wisconsin head coach Mark Johnson is very aware of.”They’ve got a pretty good power play,” Johnson said. “We’ve got to stay out of the penalty box and not give them opportunities. If our special teams can play well this weekend, that will bode well for our team.”Ohio State has also been very effective on the penalty kill, not allowing a goal despite giving up 15 power plays. The Buckeyes are led by junior defenseman Tessa Bonhomme, this week’s WCHA Defensive Player of the Week, who registered seven points against Northeastern.While Johnson is keenly aware of the challenge Ohio State’s offense presents, UW defenseman Meaghan Mikkelson is more concerned with how her own team plays.”I didn’t even know about it,” Mikkelson said, referring to Ohio State’s 16 goals. “We’re just worried about playing our best hockey, and that’s what’s important.”Wisconsin has plenty of firepower of its own, however. Led by Jinelle Zaugg, the nation’s leader in points with 10, and Sara Bauer, who is close behind Zaugg with eight, Wisconsin currently has two of the top three scorers in the country.Zaugg received recognition this week as she was named WCHA Offensive Player of the Week after scoring four goals last weekend against St. Cloud State.Zaugg, Bauer and captain Bobbi-Jo Slusar have all contributed to the offensive success of the Badgers this season, and Johnson expects them to play key roles as usual this weekend.”We need them to keep it up,” Johnson said of the Badgers’ big three. “Our good players are off to good starts, and that’s good for everybody involved, it’s a big help.”This first road series will offer another challenge, however, as the Ohio State Ice Rink is a smaller sheet than the one at the Kohl Center. The Badgers will have to be prepared for the different style of game that a smaller rink dictates.”Playing on a smaller surface is something we’ll have to adjust to,” Mikkelson said. “It might be uncomfortable, but we have to deal with it.””There’s not a lot of space,” Johnson added. “We have to be ready for it and ready to play our best on it.”Wisconsin did work on some drills this week in practice designed to encourage faster puck movement and pace of play, factors Johnson believes will be key to being successful on a smaller sheet of ice.Though the Badgers had a lot of success against the Buckeyes last year, winning all four games, this weekend’s matchup should prove to be a difficult one. Ohio State had two upset victories over then-defending champion Minnesota last season and will come out ready in their first conference series of the year.”It should be a real battle,” Johnson said. “But we’ll be ready.”last_img read more