Inside Matisyahu’s Improvisational Approach To Music On His Current College Tour

first_imgIn 2005, Matisyahu found himself on a Bonnaroo stage with Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio. While Matisyahu had been known for his spiritualized take on the roots-reggae genre, the vocalist impressed with a barrage of beatboxing and lyrical gymnastics to accompany Anastasio’s improvisational style. Though mainstream success saw Matisyahu emphasize lyrical spirituality over musical exploration, the singer’s new approach is sure to please fans of the jam style.Matisyahu’s current touring band is comprised of some of the best musicians in the business. The band features guitarist and longtime staple of the downtown New York improv scene Aaron Dugan, Dub Trio bassist and long-time Matisyahu collaborator Stu Brooks, percussionist and Cyro Baptista, go-to-drummer Tim Keiper, and virtuoso keyboardist BigYuki. As a musical unit, what they produce is greater than the sum of its parts. Of course, it’s Matisyahu’s ability to improvise vocally that makes these performances so unique.As Matisyahu explains, “When I started out I was relatively mixing two black and white things. I was a very specific brand of Chabad, Hasidic orthodox judaism, even though I came to it from a mixture of things, I became very defined as that: I decided to define myself that way. My very first record, a roots reggae record, was very black and white: a Hasidic man making roots reggae music, and over the course of the last 10-15 years, I became more interested in texture and the gray area.”Last week, Matisyahu launched a college campus tour with Nadim Azzam, promoting a message of peace and unity throughout the country. Backed by this new group of musicians, Matisyahu has shared with us a montage capturing the infectious improvisation that his band is bringing to fans on a nightly basis. Enjoy the short film below:Talking about his shows, Matisyahu says, “I don’t write a setlist, I write a list of songs. I take time between songs, sometimes up to 30 seconds or even a minute of silence to decide what the next song should be. I don’t prepare: I prepare my voice and body, but mentally the process is to let go of all preconceived notions of what the show is going to be for that night. If the show the night before went a certain way, the goal in preparation for tonight’s show is to try to not recreate that.” This is certainly a mentality that all jam fans can appreciate.Matisyahu’s college tour continues tonight, Monday March 28th, at the Newport Theatre in Ohio State University. While tickets are limited to students, staff and families, you can stream the show by following this link! We’ll be sharing major updates from Matisyahu’s tour, so don’t miss out!Matisyahu is also hitting the road with 311 this summer, with dates spanning July and August. You can catch all of Matisyahu’s tour dates on his website. Check out the campus tour schedule below:MATISYAHU with Nadim Azzam Campus TourMonday, March 28 – Ohio State University – Newport TheatreWednesday, March 30 – University of Wisconsin – Capture TheatreMonday, April 4 – University of Michigan – Hill AuditoriumTuesday, April 5 – University of Illinois – Canopy ClubSunday, April 10 – University of California Berkeley – Lower SproulTuesday, April 12 – University of California Los Angeles – Schoenberg HallThursday, April 14 – University of California San Diego – Sun God LawnTickets are exclusive, limited to students, staff, and family.last_img read more

Checklist and coaching program in India markedly improved childbirth care but did not reduce death rates

first_imgA checklist and coaching intervention to improve facility-based childbirth care and reduce deaths of women and newborns in India achieved significant gains in the quality of care during labor and delivery, but the improvements were insufficient to reduce death rates, according to a new study.The BetterBirth study is one of the largest ever conducted in maternal-newborn health, with more than 300,000 women and newborns. It is also the first study to rigorously demonstrate large-scale, broad-based improvement in care during the 48-hour period of labor and delivery when women and newborns face the greatest risk of death and complications.The study appears in the Dec. 14, 2017 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.The research was led by Ariadne Labs, a joint center of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, in partnership with the Governments of India and Uttar Pradesh; Community Empowerment Lab in Lucknow, India; Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College in Belgaum, India; Population Services International, and the World Health Organization. It was supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.The quality of care around the time of childbirth has been recognized globally as a major contributor to the persistently high rates of preventable maternal and infant deaths in childbirth, even though more women are delivering babies at facilities.  The WHO’s Safe Childbirth Checklist was designed to target the seven major causes of death by helping birth attendants consistently follow basic practices such as handwashing and use of clean gloves to prevent infection.In this randomized study conducted from 2014 to 2016, birth attendants and managers at 60 rural health centers in Uttar Pradesh were coached on use of the WHO’s Safe Childbirth Checklist … Sixty matched facilities that did not receive the intervention served as comparison sites … After two months of coaching, birth attendants completed 73 percent of the essential birth practices, 1.7 times better than the control arm at 42 percent … At twelve months, four months after the coaching ended, completion of checklist items persisted at 62 percent percent, 1.4 times better than control facilities, which remained unchanged. There was no difference between intervention and control sites, however, in stillbirths, seven-day newborn mortality, and seven-day maternal mortality and morbidity. Perinatal mortality, for instance, was 47 deaths per 1,000 live births in both groups.“Overall, we found that coaching birth attendants and managers to use the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist produced greater adherence to essential birth practices, representing significant improvements in care for women and newborns,” said BetterBirth Director Dr. Katherine Semrau, an epidemiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, and lead author.“This was the first rigorous study of deploying checklists and coaching at large scale,” said Ariadne Labs Executive Director Dr. Atul Gawande, a Harvard Chan School professor and senior co-author, who helped lead the development of the Safe Childbirth Checklist with WHO. “The results demonstrated impressive behavior change. Now we in public health must identify the additional ingredients required to produce the complete recipe for saving lives at childbirth.” Read Full Storylast_img read more