Tedeschi Trucks Band Jams With Luther Dickinson, David Hidalgo & More At SPAC [Watch]

first_imgThe Tedeschi Trucks Band’s Wheels Of Soul tour is off and running, stopping last night at the renowned Saratoga Performing Arts Center in Saratoga Springs, NY for a full night of musical celebration. Initially conceived last summer, Wheels of Soul pairs TTB with some of the best groups around. This summer, the band brought along The North Mississippi Allstars and Los Lobos for the run, and brought out members from each supporting group to enhance their own performance.No stranger to collaborations, the Tedeschi Trucks Band has hosted some all-stars in their day. Last night, the band brought out a ton of guests, including Cesar Rosa, David Hidalgo and Steve Berlin of Los Lobos, as well as Luther Dickinson of NMA. After about 10 songs of just TTB action, the band first called on Rosa for Elmore James’ “The Sky Is Crying” before bringing out Dickinson for “Angel From Montgomery” and “Let Me Get By.”The Sky Is CryingAngel From MontgomeryJam > Let Me Get ByIt was the encore that saw Hidalgo and Berlin appear with TTB, coming out for the two-song boogie of “Who Knows What Tomorrow May Bring” and “Sticks and Stones.” By all accounts, the show was a real treat.Who Knows What Tomorrow May BringSticks And StonesAdditionally, Derek Trucks made an appearance during Los Lobos’ opening set, bringing along Tim Lefebvre and the TTB Horn section to accompany on “Mas Y Mas.” Enjoy it below:Let’s give a huge thank you to Sean Roche for capturing all of these glorious videos. Check out the full setlist below.Edit this setlist | More Tedeschi Trucks Band setlistslast_img read more

Support on the cutting edge

first_img“Jamie Star challenges and enables us to do something important, without being prescriptive about how it’s done,” Douglas Melton, the Xander University Professor and Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor in the Natural Sciences, said Tuesday about the Star Family Challenge for Promising Scientific Research.At the inaugural awards ceremony for the challenge, Melton, who chairs the committee behind it, related an important dinner conversation with its founder, James A. Star ’83. Melton said the two discussed the need to fund interdisciplinary research, and the result was a clear target.“We want to fund research which would not otherwise be funded, research that would be new, and that would have large potential impact,” Melton said. “This kind of research often happens when you look between fields.”The challenge was established by Star and funded at his direction with a $10 million grant. Given biannually to Harvard faculty members, the awards range from $20,000 to $200,000 and are determined by a committee of senior FAS members.At the ceremony in a packed University Hall, this year’s four winners presented research with jaw-dropping potential. Charles Lieber, the Mark Hyman Jr. Professor of Chemistry at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), is researching ways to use nanoscale technology to create electronics that could be injected into the brain and become fully integrated with neural networks. The results could someday be used to treat diseases and traumatic injuries, Lieber said, citing epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease. Such “injectable electronics” would be much less invasive than surgery.Lieber also described his “ultimate dream”: “injectable closed-loop systems for the detection, monitoring, and treatment of diseases.”Richard Lee, a professor of stem cell and regenerative biology at Harvard University and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said a simple question lay at the heart of his research: “Can DNA tell time?” He followed with another: “Why is it that a dog keeps track of time seven times longer than we humans do?” The mechanism by which DNA tracks time is “one of the great unsolved mysteries of science,” said Lee, and the answers could help fight disease.Lee noted that people with muscular dystrophy die at about age 20, and those with cystic fibrosis die at about 30. “We’d like to extend this time,” he said. “Could we slow down time within the muscles of MD patients or within the lungs of CF patients?” He added in a later interview, “I am a physician, so thinking about patients with diseases is all that I do. I dream about being able to slow down diseases, or delay their onset.”Conor Walsh, an assistant professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering at SEAS, is developing wearable technology — “soft wearable robots” that could someday help people with limited mobility walk with their normal gait. His interdisciplinary research combines robotics, engineering, and biomechanics.Bernardo Lemos, assistant professor of environmental epigenetics at Harvard School of Public Health, studies the extraordinary resilience of microanimals called tardigrades. “These organisms can be boiled, frozen, desiccated, sent into space, subjected to radiation, and yet still remain alive,” Lemos said. His research has potential in biotechnology, materials science, and public health. “Those of us in public health worry about pollution, lead paint, heavy metals, and how all the toxicity they spread impacts us. Well, tardigrades are barely impacted at all by these things,” and knowing why could advance research, he said.After hearing from the four winners — selected from more than 60 submissions — Star said, “These were phenomenal presentations. I’m so glad to be supporting such cutting-edge research.”The challenge will continue to encourage submissions from both the natural and social sciences at Harvard, and work to help close the funding gap faced by researchers.last_img read more

Five Star White Paper Has State of the Market Covered

first_imgFive Star White Paper Has State of the Market Covered The mortgage servicing industry is worlds away from where it was six years ago at the peak of the housing crisis, and many housing metrics have returned to their pre-crisis levels of “normal” activity—which has led many to question what will become of default servicing.The Five Star Institute discusses the current state of the mortgage servicing industry in the context of delinquencies, defaults, and the homeownership rate in a new white paper, “U.S. Residential Mortgage Default Performance Update & Market Analysis.”Industry experts such as Moody’s Analytics Chief Economist Mark Zandi, Trulia Chief Economist Ralph McLaughlin, Urban Institute Housing Finance Policy Center Co-Director Laurie Goodman, Collingwood Group Managing Director Tom Booker, Five Star President and CEO Ed Delgado, and Ten-X Chief Marketing Officer Rick Sharga discussed where default numbers are now compared to where they were, and also where they are headed.“My belief and most of the economists I’ve talked to agree with this is that by next year in 2017 at some point in the year we will be back to pre-crisis normal levels of foreclosure activity,” Sharga said, predicting that there might even be an inversion in 2018.Zandi noted, “Delinquencies are about as low as they have ever been, and new defaults aren’t too far away from record lows. These are the best of times for mortgage credit. Mortgage quality will eventually begin to weaken, but we are good year or two away from that.”In the white paper, experts also took a look at the nation’s declining homeownership rate, which is currently at its lowest level in five decades, and whether or not it will improve in the near term.While many analysts claim it is the millennial demographic that is the key to improving the homeownership rate, McLaughlin said he believes Gen Xers will be critical to increasing the number of homeowners in the U.S.“If the homeownership rate were likely to be buoyed up at any point in the near future, it would be from their return into homeownership rather than millennials jumping into homeownership,” McLaughlin said.Click here to view the complete white paper.Editor’s note: The Five Star Institute is the parent company of MReport and TheMReport.com. Homeownership Rate mortgage servicing The FIve Star Intstitute 2016-08-18 Seth Welborn Sharecenter_img in Daily Dose, Data, Headlines, News August 18, 2016 652 Views last_img read more