The Floozies Announces Major Red Rocks Performance With Incredible Support

first_imgTell your mother, because The Floozies are headlining Red Rocks this fall! On October 8th, The Floozies will be performing alongside Michal Menert + The Pretty Fantastics, SunSquabi and Russ Liquid for one night of musical insanity. Morrison, CO is about to get electro-funky with all four of these great actsThe Floozies are currently on tour with SunSquabi, while Menert has been opening up select shows for Lotus on recent dates. These bands are primed and ready to go, and after a full schedule of summer festivals, they’ll be itching to get out to the acclaimed Red Rocks venue. Oh yeah!Interview: How Kool & The Gang And The Floozies Are Both The Essence Of FunkPre-sale tickets can be found here, and they come with an exclusive signed poster! Don’t miss out.last_img

Cricket News How Virat Kohli holds a crucial edge in Boxing Day Test vs Australia?

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: Virat Kohli won a crucial toss and opted to bat in the Boxing Day Test against Australia. India made a good start with Mayank Agarwal slamming a fifty on debut and shared solid stands of 40 and fifty-plus with Hanuma Vihari and Cheteshwar Pujara. India’s progress on this wicket stems from the fact that the team is in a confident mood. The reason –numbers which favour Kohli when he wins the toss. In the past couple of seasons, Kohli’s Indian cricket team has gained the upper hand whenever they have won the toss, be it at home or in overseas Tests. Under Kohli’s captaincy, the team has adopted the mantra that winning the toss gives them a crucial edge in the outcome of the game.In 45 Tests that Kohli has captained, he has won the toss 21 times which includes the toss result in the Boxing Day Test in Melbourne. Out of the 20 times he has won the toss, Kohli has tasted success in 17 games while the other three were drawn. His stats improve in overseas conditions. In eight Tests, excluding the MCG Test, Kohli has won seven games and drawn just one game. His only drawn game outside of India was the 2015 one-off Test against Bangladesh in Fatullah, which was marred by rain.Read More | Mayank Agarwal blasts fifty on debut in Boxing Day Test vs AustraliaOut of all his seven overseas Test wins, two have come in 2018. In the Johannesburg Test against South Africa, Kohli won the toss on a difficult wicket and chose to bat. The Indian cricket team put up a solid fight as they won the match by 63 runs to salvage some pride in a series which they had lost the series 1-2 due to heavy losses in Cape Town and Centurion.Read More | Agarwal, Vihari achieve a 1st for India in Boxing Day after 500 TestsIn the Adelaide Test against Australia, Kohli once again won the toss and had no hesitation in batting first and Cheteshwar Pujara’s century and fifty helped India secure a tense 31-run win. The victory was the first time India had won the first match in a Test series Down Under. With Kohli winning the toss in Melbourne, India would be hoping that they can create history and secure a win as they look to take an unassailable 2-1 lead in the four-match series and break their jinx of not securing a Test series win in Australia. last_img read more

Miguel Facussé is dead What does that mean for the people of

first_imgMiguel Facussé Barjum died late Monday just two months shy of his 91st birthday. Photo by Gustavo Bueso/Via FlickrThis Sunday, Hondurans will mark the 6th anniversary of a military coup that catapulted the Central American nation into becoming the region’s murder capital – with targeted killings of journalists, political activists and labor leaders rising to unprecedented levels. One of the alleged orchestrators of that coup, Miguel Facussé Barjum, died late this past Monday night of causes not yet disclosed, just two months shy of his 91st birthday. His death was first announced on the website of the consumer products manufacturing company he founded in July 1960, Dinant Chemicals of Central America, S.A. At the time of his death, Facussé still served as its executive president and is reputed to have been one of the richest men in the country ­– and perhaps its most ruthless. His sudden death may mean that many of the murders and other crimes of which he has been accused will remain unpunished.Although a death at that age is not unusual, it is odd that no cause of death has been reported in any of the press. But then, Miguel Facussé did not live a “usual” life. He was born in Tegucigalpa on Aug. 14, 1924, the seventh of nine children. His parents were Christian Palestinian immigrants to Honduras. He went to Notre Dame University in the United States, where, according to the biography on his company website, he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautical Engineering. He later moved to Costa Rica where he served for a time as general manager of Taca Airlines. Shortly thereafter, he moved back to Tegucigalpa and launched Dinant Corporation.Facussé rapidly rose to political prominence in Honduras. His business tenacity, commended by some, meant that Facussé would stop at nothing in dealing with his opponents. His legacy is one of both business acumen and violence.A statement from his company called him “a pioneer with unflinching spirit”; that spirit often led to less than peaceful means, and he has been termed by many as “cold-blooded” and “ruthless.”In 2012, Facussé was accused of “crimes against humanity” in the International Criminal Court for his role in a bloody land conflict raging in northeastern Honduras between his company, Dinant, and the peasant farmers of the area. Dozens – and likely hundreds – of peasants and solidarity workers have been killed in that conflict. Most prominently, Facussé was accused of orchestrating the 2012 murder of human rights lawyer Antonio Trejo, who was working with displaced families and against Facussé in the lower Aguán River valley, also known as Bajo Aguán.In an interview with The Los Angeles Times he talked about the accusations that he was behind the killing of Trejo. Facussé reportedly told the Times reporter, “I probably had reasons to kill him.” However, he denied it, continuing, “but I’m not a killer.” Via WikileaksFacussé has been implicated in many other extra-legal activities as well. Wikileaks cables released in 2011 show that the U.S. Embassy in Honduras, as early as 2004, believed Facussé was also involved in drug trafficking. The media group Reporters Without Borders has also called him a “predator” for his role in a crackdown on opposition and grassroots media in Honduras.Community Radio station KGNU in Boulder, Colorado, was one of the first news outlets in the United States to report Facussé’s death. Their reporter had been fired on by a security guard at one of the palm oil plantations while traveling with a human rights delegation to the region. These plantations are where the majority of the violence of which Facussé is accused has occurred. Much of the population of northeastern Honduras are Garifuna and face cultural and racial discrimination, as well. Dinant Corporation.At the time of the June 2009 military coup that deposed elected President Manuel Zelaya, Miguel Facussé – whose nephew Carlos Roberto Flores Facussé was a Honduran president from 1998-2002 – was very supportive. His private plane was even used to illegally transport Zelaya’s foreign minister out of the country against her will. Facussé, along with other business leaders opposed to Zelaya’s reforms, called him a “puppet” of Venezuela’s former President Hugo Chávez, and said that Zelaya was “bad for business” in Honduras.Facussé’s Dinant Corporation has been the largest producer of palm oil in Honduras since it began production in 2006. The oil — used in everyday foodstuffs as well as in beauty products — is made from the processed fruit of African palm trees. In order to successfully produce substantial amounts of oil, Facussé needed land for planting.Beginning in 1992 as part of a nationwide privatization campaign, Facussé, along with a few other Honduran businessmen, began to acquire land in the lower Aguán region in the northeastern part of Honduras. He came to control over 22,000 acres of palm oil plantations. The land was previously in the hands of peasant farmer cooperatives that claim these “purchases” were made through intimidation, bribery and coercion. For this reason, many peasant farmers in the area still believe the land is rightfully theirs and they are struggling to regain control of it. A coalition of campesino organizations meeting in Bajo Aguán, Honduras, in 2013. Photo by Cristalyne BellSince the 1990s, peasant farmers of the area have held rallies, marches and even occupied the land, seizing control of parts of the plantations – sometimes for weeks at a time. However, usually, these peasants are violently removed and their movements repressed by police friendly to Facussé or by Facussé’s own private security guards. Houses in small communities of displaced farmers have been bulldozed and burned.Ninety-two people were killed in these land disputes between 2009 and 2012, according to a 2014 report by Human Rights Watch. That number is likely much higher. Many more have been subject to non-lethal violence and torture. Almost exclusively, the peasants targeted have been part of organized peasant resistance movements in the area.According to a 2013 report in Dollars & Sense Magazine, Facussé’s security guards are believed to have been directly involved in many of these deaths. The body of Gregorio Chávez, a peasant from the community of La Panamá, was found in an unmarked grave deep inside one of Facussé’s palm plantations. The body showed signs of torture before death.These crimes against local farmers have been carried out with impunity and to such a level that past-President Porfirio Lobo called the situation a “national security crisis.” According to the 2014 Human Rights Watch report, of the 73 killings linked to land conflicts that the Honduran government recorded, only seven had been brought to trial. Three youth walk away from the grave of Gregorio Chávez near the community of La Panamá, Honduras, in 2013. Photo by Cristalyne BellAs a result of his involvement in this violent conflict, Facussé lost several international development loans over the years. In 2014, the World Bank Group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC) noted the violence in Aguán as well as Facussé’s probable involvement, and implemented an action plan to remedy the situation before more loans are made. U.S. Rep. Howard Berman mentioned Facussé in a letter to then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, saying U.S. aid should be withheld until he is investigated for potential human rights violations.Although Facussé was the figurehead of violence and impunity in Bajo Aguán, what impact his death will have on the region remains unclear. Gilberto Ríos, former country director of FIAN International, who worked closely with peasant farmers in Aguán until two months ago, told The Tico Times emphatically that nothing will change as a result of Facussé’s death.“In [Facussé’s] lands, the campesinos enter and are then dislocated by the police and Facussé’s private guards, who are permanently in the area. But that will continue with Facussé or without Facussé,” Ríos said. “His matters will be handled by his executives and surely by his children.”Although a successor has not yet been named, Facussé is survived by several children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews.A new feature-length film, “Resistencia: The Fight for the Aguán Valley,” will be launched on June 28th and available for free online viewing for two weeks.Resistencia: The Fight for the Aguan Valley | OFFICIAL TRAILER from Makila, Coop on Vimeo.–Sarah Blaskey is a freelance journalist based in Costa Rica. Her 2013 article “Palm Oil Oppression” appeared in the magazine Dollars & Sense. Norman Stockwell is based in Madison, Wisconsin, and frequently contributes to The Tico Times. His reporting on the Honduran presidential election of 2013 can be found in The Progressive magazine and the Capital Times. Facebook Comments Related posts:Is Honduras heading for the privatization of parts of its territory? Honduran judges sacked for opposing 2009 coup seek reparations at Inter-American Court of Human Rights In 2nd day of trial, Honduran judges say they acted in defense of human rights Honduras brings homicide rate downlast_img read more