Termite Training.

first_imgLively DiscussionThis training’s final exam sparked some lively debate between operators and inspectors.”We’re not through yet,” said one inspector.”I feel like we’re playing survivor here,” said a pest control technician.”We are,” the inspector replied.”It’s kind of a marriage,” Chase said, “of (operators and inspectors) who at times can be at odds.”Improving Termite Control”I think it allows them to better treat the typical Georgian’s home,” said Suiter, who fielded the questions that emerged from the class’s final assignment.The Department of Agriculture, UGA CAES and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsor the training facility. More than 300 pest control operators and inspectors have trained at the unique center since it opened in July 1998. They, in turn, train their co-workers back home.”I’ll take the time out now to look at a fireplace a lot differently every time I go up to one,” said Chase at the end of the session. When it comes to protecting their homes against termites, consumers want to know if they get the protection they pay for.One way to help ease consumers’ concerns is to teach pest control operators, and the people who regulate them, the latestand most effective, environmentally friendly ways to protect houses. Posing for a class picture are 13 of the more than 300 pest control operators who have trained at the Georgia Structural Pest Control Training Center in Griffin, Ga. Photo: Joe Courson In one Griffin, Ga., site, pest control operators can test termite-control skills on foundations built from every type of material used in Georgia. “One, two, three, go get ’em,” said Dan Suiter as he took a picture of one of the University of Georgia’s quarterly classes of termite killers.Final ExamSuiter, a UGA Extension Service entomologist and an expert on controlling termites, directed the class to an odd-looking house foundation nearby for their final assignment.It sounded easy enough: Treat the walls of a typical house for termites, something Curley Chase has done day in and day out for 32 years. “It’s easy until you’ve got the boss looking over your shoulder,” Chase said.The “boss” is Meredith Harr, one of the Georgia Department of Agriculture’s 22 termite inspectors. She and the other inspectors follow up on 1,900 consumer complaints each year.”This is the kind of stuff we’ve got to check behind these guys on,” Harr said.Versatile Training CenterThe training is especially effective because the Georgia Structural Pest Control Training Center includes a home foundation built from every type of material used to build Georgia homes.From stucco to block to brick to poured foundation, they’re all available at the training center on the Griffin, Ga., campus of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”It allows that technician to get out here and envision what is behind that wall, what might be behind that brick facade,” Suiter said. Photo: Joe Coursonlast_img read more

Springfield lands $110,000 ‘brownfields’ clean-up grant for Fellows site

first_img-30- Governor Jim Douglas has announced that $110,000 will be granted to the Precision Valley Development Corporation to continue clean-up activities at the former Fellows Gear Shaper property in Springfield. This proposal will help continue with the re-development of a critical downtown property, said Governor Douglas. This will not only help the town s economy, but will turn a blighted property into clean, safe commercial space, including space for the Springfield Hospital health center.These funds are being made available to PVDC from the State s Brownfield Fund, which will be leveraged with another $80,000 from the Southern Windsor County Regional Planning Commission s (SWCRPC) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) supplemental funding through the Environmental Protection Agency.Redevelopment of the site, located in Springfield s downtown, will result in the reuse of a historic building and provide new office and commercial space. The State of Vermont and SWCRPC are working very closely with the developers of the property, 100 River Street, LLC and the Springfield Regional Development Corporation.The Environmental Protection Agency has capitalized both the State s and SWCRPC s funds through its competitive brownfields Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) program.To date, the State has been awarded over $1.5 million for clean-up of brownfield sites; and SWCRPC has been awarded close to $3 million in RLF and assessment funding.Last year, the state awarded $750,000 to the town for use in installing new safety systems such as sprinklers and emergency lighting at the Fellows building, located at 100 River Street, and in 2008 the state authorized $344,731 worth of tax credits to help refurbish the historic building.For additional information about the Governor s Vermont Brownfields Initiative, please see the Agency of Commerce and Community Development website at: http://www.dhca.state.vt.us/brownfields/index.htm(link is external).Source: Governor’s office. 3.24.2010last_img read more

Flu shots now open to all; officials fear fake Tamiflu

first_img “Starting today, October 24th, we’re making influenza shots available to everyone,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt. “There’s no reason for anyone to delay or go without their seasonal flu shot.” Von Eschenbach announced that the FDA is forming a “rapid response team” of experts to help make sure antiviral drugs are available in the event of a flu pandemic. In early September, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had recommended that flu shots be reserved for people at risk for serious flu complications until today. (The recommendation did not apply to MedImmune’s live-virus vaccine [FluMist], which is licensed only for healthy people between ages 5 and 49.) Despite some scattered shortages caused by delayed vaccine deliveries, the CDC stuck to that timetable. See also: “Providers in areas with sufficient flu vaccine already should open up their programs to the expanded group of people” not at high risk for complications, she said. She recommended that clinicians who have an ample supply of vaccine inform local public health officers so the latter can help shift surplus doses to providers who need them. CDC officials repeated their estimate that at least 71 million doses of flu vaccine will be available in the United States this season, compared with about 60 million last year, when the loss of 48 million doses expected from Chiron triggered shortages. CDC Director Dr. Julie Gerberding said the flu season is just beginning. “We’re seeing very sporadic activity in seven states, and local activity in one state.” Leavitt observed that oseltamivir has been “much in the news” because of the chance that H5N1 avian flu will lead to a human flu pandemic. Many countries, including the United States, are trying to build stockpiles of oseltamivir, but the drug takes a long time to produce. Some localized vaccine shortages have been reported as a result of delayed deliveries, but they are expected to clear up soon, Gerberding said. At a news briefing, officials also warned that the threat of a flu pandemic may spur the sale of fake versions of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu). To make sure they get the genuine article, officials said, people should seek the drug through their physician. The best way to avoid fake oseltamivir is to get it from state-licensed pharmacies, said von Eschenbach. “We feel strongly that the best protection for patients is to avail themselves of the drug in the context of a doctor-patient relationship.”center_img He added that people seeking a flu shot should make an appointment, because some providers may not have received their vaccine yet. In a news release issued this afternoon, he said, “Using the Rapid Response Team approach, we believe we could review a complete drug application in six to eight weeks.” Because demand for the drug far exceeds the supply, said Leavitt, “We’re concerned about the threat of counterfeiting of Tamiflu.” The CDC still expects 60 million doses from Sanofi Pasteur, 3 million from MedImmune, and 8 million from GlaxoSmithKline, said CDC spokeswoman Christina Pearson. She said the agency also expects up to 18 million doses from Chiron, which until last week was projecting 18 million to 26 million. Gerberding said that right now she does not expect a shortage of oseltamivir for use against seasonal flu. “The manufacturer still has several million doses in the pipeline,” she said. “The doses that haven’t been distributed yet exceed the number prescribed last year by a significant amount. At this point there’s no evidence of a shortage that’s going to result in any clinical impact on patients. We’ll monitor that.” Oct 24, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Seasonal influenza shots are not just for high-risk groups anymore, and everyone interested in a shot should go ahead and seek one out, federal health officials said today. Gerberding said people who experience flu symptoms and have not been vaccinated, especially if they are in a high-risk group, should call their physician promptly to find out if treatment with an antiviral drug would be appropriate. Preventive treatment with an antiviral may be indicated n some cases, such as for people who can’t be vaccinated because of an egg allergy. In response to questions, Leavitt and Andrew von Eschenbach, acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), said they had seen no evidence of counterfeiting to date. But Leavitt said, “It’s a situation that’s ripe for counterfeiting. The WHO [World Health Organization] now indicates that counterfeit drug making is a $34 billion–a-year industry. We’re seeing it in many other instances.” FDA news releasehttp://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2005/ucm108502.htmlast_img read more

Kearns confident in ability of Premier County

first_imgLiam Kearns says the performance of the team in Killarney showed they’re more than capable of putting it up to the so-called stronger counties…Throw in at Kingspan Breffni Park is at 5 o’clock on Saturday…Tipp FM will have full live coverage with our build-up getting underway at 4.45…in association with McDonalds, at Junction 8 on the M8, Cashel. Tipperary’s senior football manager says his side’s display in the Munster final means they can be optimistic about their prospects in this weekend’s qualifier.The Premier County face Derry in a Round 4A encounter in Cavan on Saturday evening. Tipp booked their place in the qualifiers after the defeat in the Munster Final to Kerry.last_img