Galactic Covers Bob Dylan, The Meters With Cyril Neville In NY Rager With Soulive

first_imgSaturday night in NYC was one for the books with the double header of Soulive and Galactic bringing the funk to Terminal 5. The packed house was buzzing with excitement, ready for a double dose of funk provided by some of the best in the biz. The addition of the legendary Cyril Neville to Galactic’s set made for a particularly special show, highlighted by memorable covers of The Meters, Bob Dylan, Curtis Mayfield, the Pointer Sisters and more.Soulive opened strong with their classic “Hat Trick”, during which guitarist Eric Krasno channeled his inner Jerry Garcia vibe for a short measure. Drummer Alan Evans then took to the mic to introduce everyone before delving into a new tune, “Common”. The band weaved seamlessly through “Common” into an older classic “Shaheed” before crushing on another new one called “BB Gun”. The trio slipped the new songs in without throwing the crowd off with the newness, but the diehards who knew, knew. It was perfect placement and flawless.New Orleans staple Galactic was next on the docket and ready to bring the funk hard. The band got the crowd into the NOLA spirit from the start, entering the stage to Carnival tunes resemblant of a Mardi Gras morning. They kicked things off in high spirits with a track off their latest album, “Sugar Doosie”. Frequent guest singer Erica Falls joined on shortly after, leading the band through newer track “Right On” into a funky cover of Curtis Mayfield’s “Hard Times”. A powerful rendition of their “Dolla Diva” kept things grooving before delving into Rebirth Brass Band’s “AP Tureaud”. The energy in the room exploded as Cyril Neville took the stage, introduced as “the greatest soul singer alive” and ready to prove himself worthy of that title. The New Orleans legend came out grooving to a cover of The Meters’ “Gossip”, for which Neville provided vocals on the original. Continuing with the theme of keeping it in the family, he then busted out “Tell Me What’s On Your Mind”, a Neville Brothers throwback.Neville briefly departed from the stage as Soulive/Lettuce guitarist Eric Krasno joined on for the very funky “Cineramascope” off Galactic’s Ya-Ka-May. A soulful guitar solo quickly escalated into a rocking jam, prompting a massive dance party from the audience. Falls returned to the stage to aid on one of the band’s most well-known, feel-good tracks, “Hey Na Na”. As the band has cycled through several guest singers over the years, this song has been tested out by its fair share of vocalists from across a wide spectrum, including David Shaw of The Revivalists and Maggie Koerner on the studio version. While each of these contributors adds a little something different – Shaw more of an edge perhaps, and Koerner a softer feminine touch – Falls’ dominating stage presence and booming voice on this song really knocked it out of the park. In this moment it was clear that she has gotten into her groove with the band and established herself as a key member.Falls continued to shine with the highlight of the show, a powerful rendition of Bob Dylan’s “Like A Rolling Stone” that had everyone singing and dancing along. She then left the stage as the band was joined by saxophonist Ben Ellman’s cousin, Lucas Ellman of Chicago-based band The Heard, leading the funk army through a grooving rendition of Watts 103rd St Rhythm Band’s “65 Bars And A Taste Of Soul”. Neville rejoined the group for a heavy Meters double header, segueing into a cover of “No More Okey Doke” and following it up with “You’ve Got To Change (You’ve Got To Reform)”, all the while maintaining the good spirits and high energy in the room. Neville left the stage to make way for Falls to close out the show with a crushing version of the Pointer Sisters’ “Going Down Slowly”, her electrifying vocals filling over the room for one last time before the encore.After a short break, the quintet returned to the stage one last time to play an older original, “Funky Bird”. Finally, Falls and Neville both came out to bring things to a close with The Meters’ “Africa”. The combination of the two dynamic vocalists along with seasoned funk veterans Galactic was out of control, and funk levels were at an all time high with everyone vibing together on stage, raging properly and showing New York how NOLA does it.Setlist: Soulive at Terminal 5, New York, NY – 3/26/16Hat Trick, Common, Shaheed, BB Gun, One In Seven, Revolution, PJ’s, TuesdaySetlist: Galactic at Terminal 5, New York, NY – 3/26/16Set: Sugar Doosie, Right On, Hard Times, Dolla Diva, AP Tureaud, Gossip, Tell Me What’s On Your Mind, Cineramascope, Hey Na Na, Like A Rolling Stone, 65 Bars And A Taste Of Soul, No More Okey Doke, You’ve Got To Change (You’ve Got To Reform), Going Down SlowlyEncore: Funky Bird, AfricaPhotos by James Bell. Full Gallery: Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Buyers snap up off-the-plan townhouses in ‘blue chip’ Everton Park

first_imgAn artist impressions of the bathroom inside one of the boutique townhouses at Mosaic Property Group’s new Silvergum development at Everton Park.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus23 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market23 hours ago HOME: An artist impressions of the living and dining area inside one of the boutique townhouses at Mosaic Property Group’s new Silvergum development at Everton Park.Construction of the 28 boutique townhouses has not even started yet but already 24 have been sold off the plan.Mosaic Property Group has commenced civil works at its Silvergum development in Everton Park, a suburb described by the developer as an emerging “blue-chip” location.One of Brisbane’s most tightly-held suburbs, Everton Park is undergoing a transformation, with townhouses and unit complexes rising beside family homes. Within 10km of the Brisbane CBD, Everton Park has well-established parks, shopping and entertainment options, is close to public transport and good schools, and is consistently in high demand. An artist impressions of the living and dining area inside one of the boutique townhouses at Mosaic Property Group’s new Silvergum development at Everton Park. An artist impressions of the dining area and patio at one of the boutique townhouses at Mosaic Property Group’s new Silvergum development at Everton Park.Mosaic Property Group managing director Brook Monahan said the company chose their markets carefully.“Everton Park may be an older suburb but its demographic is quite young, including families and professionals. Access to the city is also a prime consideration,” he said. “All these elements provide Everton Park with its growing standing as a blue-chip suburb. The quality of our product aside, the sales success we have achieved at Silvergum is probably the best indicator of the suburb’s appeal.” An artist impressions of the exterior of one of the boutique townhouses at Mosaic Property Group’s new Silvergum development at Everton Park.The median house price in Everton Park has grown by 28 per cent in five years and was $585,000 in July, according to CoreLogic.On average, residents hold on to houses in the area for 13.8 years, and when they do hit the market they are usually sold within 18 days.Mr Monahan said the company considered highly sought-after suburbs with limited or constrained supply to be “blue-chip locations”from a development perspective. “We avoid the inner 2km radius of the Brisbane CBD as a general rule due to the high supply of investment grade apartments,” he said.The Silvergum development is expected to be completed by September next year. Three-bedroom townhouses start from $580,000 and four-bedrooms from $650,000. They range in size from 238sq m to 337sq m.last_img read more

One way to end violence against women? Married dads.

first_imgThe Washington Post 10 June 2014W. Bradford Wilcox, a professor of sociology at the University of Virginia, directs the Home Economics Project at the American Enterprise Institute and the Institute for Family Studies. His most recent book is Gender and Parenthood: Biological and Social Scientific Perspectives and you can follow him on Twitter: @WilcoxNMP Robin Fretwell Wilson is the Roger and Stephany Joslin Professor of Law
 and Director of the Program in Family Law and Policy at the University of IllinoisThe dramatic social media response to the UC-Santa Barbara shooting, captured by the hashtag #YesAllWomen, underlined an important and unpleasant truth: across the United States, millions of girls and women have been abused, assaulted, or raped by men, and even more females fear that they will be subject to such an attack. As Sarah Kliff wrote in Vox: a “national survey of American women found that a slight majority (51.9 percent) reported experiencing physical violence at some point in their life.”This social media outpouring makes it clear that some men pose a real threat to the physical and psychic welfare of women and girls. But obscured in the public conversation about the violence against women is the fact that some other men are more likely to protect women, directly and indirectly, from the threat of male violence: married biological fathers. The bottom line is this: Married women are notably safer than their unmarried peers, and girls raised in a home with their married father are markedly less likely to be abused or assaulted than children living without their own father.Start with the threat that girls face from men. One of the most comprehensive portraits of sexual and physical abuse of girls (and boys) comes from the Fourth National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect. As the figure above indicates, children are more likely to be abused when they do not live in a home with their married father. What’s more: girls and boys are significantly more likely to be abused when they are living in a cohabiting household with an unrelated adult—usually their mother’s boyfriend. Indeed, the report notes that “only 0.7 per 1,000 children living with two married biological parents were sexually abused, compared to 12.1 per 1,000 children living with a single parent who had an unmarried partner.” The results from this federal study are consistent with academic research (see here and here, as well) that indicates that “girls who are victimized are … more likely to have lived without their natural fathers,” and that the risk is especially high when a boyfriend or stepfather is in the picture.The risk of physical abuse also increases when a child lives without her father, once again, particularly when an unrelated boyfriend is in the home. A 2005 study published in Pediatrics found that  “[c]hildren residing in households with unrelated adults were nearly 50 times as likely to die of inflicted injuries than children residing with 2 biological parents.”Women are also safer in married homes. As the figure above (derived from a recent Department of Justice study) indicates, married women are the least likely to be victimized by an intimate partner. They are also less likely to be the victims of violent crime in general. Overall, another U.S. Department of Justice study found that never-married women are nearly four times more likely to be victims of violent crime, compared to married women. The bottom line is that married women are less likely to be raped, assaulted, or robbed than their unmarried peers.What’s going on here? Why are women safer when married and children safer when living with their married biological parents? For girls, the research tells us that marriage provides a measure of stability and commitment to the adults’ relationship, that married biological fathers are more likely to be attentive and engaged with their children because they expect the relationship to be enduring. As a consequence, unrelated males are less likely to have sustained interaction with children of the family when dad has a day-in-day-out presence in the home. More generally, the “emotional support and the supervision” that engaged fathers provide to their children can limit their vulnerability to potential predators, as David Finkelhor, director of the University of New Hampshire Crimes Against Children Research Center, has observed.For women, part of the story is about what social scientists call a “selection effect,” namely, women in healthy, safe relationships are more likely to select into marriage, and women in unhealthy, unsafe relationships often lack the power to demand marriage or the desire to marry. Of course, women in high conflict marriages are more likely to select into divorce.But marriage also seems to cause men to behave better. That’s because men tend to settle down after they marry, to be more attentive to the expectations of friends and kin, to be more faithful, and to be more committed to their partners—factors that minimize the risk of violence. What’s more: women who are married are more likely to live in safer neighborhoods, to have a partner who is watching out for their physical safety, and—for obvious reasons—to spend less time in settings that increase their risk of rape, robbery, and assaults.To be sure, it doesn’t take a viewing of “The Burning Bed” or “Safe Haven”to realize that married men can and do abuse or assault their wives or daughters. Marriage is no panacea when it comes to male violence. But married fathers are much less likely to resort to violence than men who are not tied by marriage or biology to a female. And, most fundamentally, for the girls and women in their lives, married fathers provide direct protection by watching out for the physical welfare of their wives and daughters, and indirect protection by increasing the odds they live in safe homes and are not exposed to men likely to pose a threat.So, women: if you’re the product of a good marriage, and feel safer as a consequence, lift a glass to dear old dad this Sunday.http://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2014/06/10/the-best-way-to-end-violence-against-women-stop-taking-lovers-and-get-married/last_img read more