Polaroid PoGo brings instant printing to the digital age

first_img Citation: Polaroid PoGo brings instant printing to the digital age (2009, October 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-polaroid-pogo-instant-digital-age.html © 2009 PhysOrg.com Polaroid PoGo Instant Digital Camera As with most digital cameras the PoGo allows you to take a picture and review it on the LCD. You can then delete, adjust, crop, save, or upload it, and add a date and file number if you wish. But with the Polaroid PoGo Instant Digital you can also print the picture then and there with a simple press of the Print button on the back of the camera. You can even add a border to the picture you print. The PoGo Instant Digital has a built-in ZINK (zero ink) printer. In the ZINK process a paper is used that has dye crystals embedded in it. The print head in the printer heats the paper to fix the image and colors. The new printer is similar to the Polaroid PoGo Instant Mobile Printer, but is faster, and the quality has improved. Prints are small, at only two inches by three, and have a peel-off sticky back for instantly sticking the photo into an album or book, for example. The prints are smudge-free and water and tear resistant. The print quality is excellent for this type of printer, and according to Polaroid an even better paper is expected to be released next year. The paper comes in packs of 10, 30 or 80. Loading the camera is a simple matter of opening the back and inserting the pack of paper. The camera has an SD card slot but no card is supplied. The internal memory of 4MB is sufficient for 10 pictures at the lowest quality or five at the highest, but many users will probably print the pictures and then immediately delete them, so the relatively low memory may not be an issue. If it is an issue, it’s a simple matter to buy an SD card and use it to store the images.The Polaroid PoGo Instant Digital camera retails at around $200. Spare rechargeable batteries are expected to become available by the end of the year, and they will be useful as the battery lasts for only 20-30 prints. Dell’s Wasabi printer loses on price and quality (PhysOrg.com) — Polaroid, founded in 1937 by American physicist Edwin H. Land, invented instant photographic printing. Its first instant film camera went on sale in November 1948, but in February 2008 the company decided to cease all production in favor of digital photography products. Earlier this year, Polaroid returned to the concept of instant printing and brought it into the digital age with its PoGo Instant Digital camera. Now you can take digital photographs and print them instantly.center_img Polaroid PoGo Instant Digital Camera Polaroid PoGo Instant Digital Camera This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further The PoGo is a 5-megapixel digital camera with built-in printer. The camera looks like a regular digital camera, except it is a little larger, and has a slot on one side through which the prints emerge. The other side of the camera has power and USB connections for uploading the pictures to computer or printing on a normal photo-quality printer.The camera has a fixed focus lens, 4 x digital zoom, built-in flash, and a three-inch wide color LCD screen with menu and controls on the back. Picture image quality is about equivalent to that of a high quality camera phone. last_img read more

Researchers discover ancient virus DNA remnants necessary for pluripotency in humans

first_img(Phys.org) —A team of Canadian and Singaporean researchers has discovered that remnants of ancient viral DNA in human DNA must be present for pluripotency to occur in human stem cells. In their paper published in the journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, the team describes how they disabled a viral remnant in stem cell samples and discovered that doing so prevented the stem cell from being able to grow into all but one type of human cell. More information: The retrovirus HERVH is a long noncoding RNA required for human embryonic stem cell identity, Nature Structural & Molecular Biology (2014) DOI: 10.1038/nsmb.2799AbstractHuman endogenous retrovirus subfamily H (HERVH) is a class of transposable elements expressed preferentially in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Here, we report that the long terminal repeats of HERVH function as enhancers and that HERVH is a nuclear long noncoding RNA required to maintain hESC identity. Furthermore, HERVH is associated with OCT4, coactivators and Mediator subunits. Together, these results uncover a new role of species-specific transposable elements in hESCs. Retrovirus in the human genome is active in pluripotent stem cells All of the cells in the human body start out as stem cells—the ability of such cells to do so is known as pluripotency. Scientists don’t really understand how individual stem cells know which type to become but are working hard to find out—it could lead to the development of cures for many diseases or the regeneration of lost limbs. In this new effort, the researchers wondered about the role of remnant viral DNA in stem cell DNA and pluripotency in general.Scientists have known for some time that viral DNA exists in human DNA, the result of retrovirus infections millions of years ago. Retroviruses reproduce by injecting their own DNA into the DNA of a host—if it occurs in sperm or egg cells, the virus DNA can end up in the DNA of the host. Until now, scientists have thought that remnant viral DNA was simply “junk” DNA—meaning it didn’t do anything at all. Now it appears clear that at least one type of such DNA—HERV-H—actually plays a very important role in pluripotency.The researchers treated some human stem cells with a small amount of RNA designed to suppress HERV-H. Doing so, they found, removed the stem cell’s ability to develop into any human cell—instead they would only grow into cells that resembled fibroblasts—cells normally found in connective tissue. A closer look revealed that suppressing HERV-H also suppressed the production of proteins necessary for pluripotency. Thus, at least in humans, the remnant viral DNA appears to be necessary for normal human development—without it, human life would be impossible.Because of the role HERV-H plays in pluripotency, its possible other remnant viral DNA plays a role in human development as well, thus it’s very likely that other research efforts will focus on testing each to see if they are more than just junk left over from infections over the course of human evolution. Journal information: Nature Structural and Molecular Biology Explore further , Nature Structural & Molecular Biology Human embryonic stem cells in cell culture. Credit: Wikipedia. © 2014 Phys.org Citation: Researchers discover ancient virus DNA remnants necessary for pluripotency in humans (2014, March 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-03-ancient-virus-dna-remnants-pluripotency.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Thailand and Myanmar kick off joint familiarisation trip

first_imgThe Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) and the Ministry of Hotels and Tourism, Myanmar have launched the Mega Joint Familiarisation Trip between Thailand and Myanmar.The project aims to promote tourism products and services in Thailand and Myanmar to long-haul European and United States travellers.The event comes as the two neighbours move towards full implementation of the ASEAN Economic Community or AEC at the end of this year.The joint familiarisation trip from 14-21 May marks the launch of the bilateral tourism cooperation and welcomes over 50 tour operators and media from Europe and the US.Thailand Minister of Tourism and Sports H.E. Kobkarn Wattanavrangkul said the event is one initiative to promote tourism growth in ASEAN.“Many parts of ASEAN have never really been opened to the eyes of the world before, and by forming bilateral tourism cooperation with our ASEAN friends, we will be able to open up unseen, untapped, beautiful tourism destinations altogether,” Ms Wattanavrangkul said.“As such, international tourists who come to visit Thailand will also be able to extend their vacation to explore the charming culture and various world-renowned tourist attractions in our neighbouring countries.”Chiang Mai in Northern Thailand is the host city for this joint trip due to its modern infrastructure, easy accessibility, variety of tourism products and international standards of service.The familiarisation trip comes under the ‘ASEAN for all’ dimension, in which Thailand has made agreements with, and is set to form tourism cooperation with other ASEAN neighbours.TAT executive director Europe, Africa and Middle East Region Tanes Petsuwan, said the launch of the bilateral agreement with Myanmar is a win-win situation for both countries.“It will also allow us to tap the potential of the many long holiday weekends to attract short-stay but high-spending traffic from the neighbouring countries, which are all within three to four hours flying time of each other, similar to European countries,” Mr Petsuwan said.Source = ETB Travel News: Brittney Levinsonlast_img read more