Matuidi: I see why Ronaldo is best in the world

first_imgBlaise Matuidi says he has a better understanding of why Cristiano Ronaldo has won five Ballons d’Or in his career, hailing his new Juventus team-mate as a “working monster”.Juve lured the Portuguese star to Turin this summer in the most high-profile move of the summer as they look to maintain their dominance of the Italian league and improve their chances of Champions League success.The 33-year-old is yet to find his first goal for Massimiliano Allegri’s team so far, drawing a blank in victories over Parma, Lazio and Chievo. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! But former Manchester United and Real Madrid star Ronaldo is expected to get off the mark before too long after scoring 44 times in as many games last season.And Matuidi has already been impressed by the five-time Champions League winner and is enjoying playing in the same team so far.”He’s the best player in the world, and it’s a lot of fun playing with him,” the French midfielder said. “He’s a working monster. He arrives first and leaves last. He’s working and working … I’ve never seen that and I understand better why he has five Ballons d’Or.”Despite Ronaldo’s lack of goals, the Bianconeri have a perfect record after three games in Serie A and face Sassuolo in their next game.The Italian giants have been drawn in a group with Ronaldo’s former side United as well as Valencia and Young Boys in the Champions League.Their European adventure begins at the Mestalla when they visit Valencia in September 19.last_img read more

Survey Consumers neutral on risks benefits of nano

first_imgShareLong DescriptionCONTACT: Jade BoydPHONE: 713-348-6778E-MAIL: [email protected]: Consumers neutral on risks, benefits of nanoStudy probes public’s willingness to use specific nanoproductsThe largest and most comprehensive survey of public perceptions of nanotechnology products finds that U.S. consumers are willing to use specific nano-containing products – even if there are health and safety risks – when the potential benefits are high. The study also finds that U.S. consumers rate nanotechnology as less risky than everyday technologies like herbicides, chemical disinfectants, handguns and food preservatives.The study, which was conducted by researchers at Rice University’s Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology (CBEN), University College London (UCL) and the London Business School, is the largest survey yet conducted on public willingness to use commercial nanotechnology products. It appears in the December issue of Nature Nanotechnology.“By some estimates, products containing nanotechnology already account for more than $30 billion in annual global sales, but there is concern that the public’s fixation with nanotechnology’s risks – either real or imaged – will diminish consumers’ appetite for products,” said lead researcher Steven Currall, a management and entrepreneurship expert who conducted the research while a faculty member at Rice and while at UCL and London Business School, where he currently holds academic appointments. “Measuring public sentiment toward nanotechnology lets us both check the pulse of the industry right now, and chart the growth or erosion of public acceptance in the future.”The research was based on more than 5,500 survey responses. The authors of the article developed the surveys, which were administered by Zogby International. The surveys defined nanotechnology as involving “human-designed materials or machines at extremely small sizes that have unique chemical, physical, electrical or other properties.”One survey polled consumers about how likely they would be to use four specific, nano-containing products: a drug, skin lotion, automobile tires and refrigerator gas coolant. This is the first large-scale study to experimentally gauge the public’s reaction to specific, nano-containing products, and Currall said the use of scenarios about plausible, specific products yielded results that challenge the assumption that the public focuses narrowly on risk.“It was clear that people were thinking about more than risk,” he said. “The average consumer is pretty shrewd when it comes to balancing risks against benefits, and we found that the greater the potential benefits, the more risks people are willing to tolerate.”Study co-author Neal Lane, who helped craft the U.S.’s National Nanotechnology Initiative during his tenure as director of the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, said the public is likely to become more aware of nanotechnology’s risks as environmental health and safety research is completed and as nanomaterials find their way into more products. What remains to be seen is whether the public’s budding perceptions of the benefits of nanotechnology will also grow, he said.“We propose that academic bodies like the UK’s Royal Society and the US’s National Academies set up interagency clearinghouses to coordinate public education and synthesize the latest scientific findings,” said Lane, senior fellow in science and technology at Rice’s Baker Institute for Public Policy. “Transmitting the latest information about both risks and benefits, in a timely, thorough and transparent way, will minimize the likelihood of a polarized public debate that turns on rumor and supposition.”Currall is Professor of Enterprise and the Management of Innovation in the Faculty of Engineering Sciences at UCL and the director of both the Management Studies Centre and the Centre for Enterprise and the Management of Innovation at UCL. He is also Visiting Professor of Entrepreneurship at London Business School (joint with UCL) and Faculty Co-Director of the School’s Institute of Technology.Lane is the Malcolm Gillis University Professor and professor of physics and astronomy at Rice.Co-authors include Rice doctoral students Juan Madera and Stacey Turner, and former Rice doctoral student Eden King, now an Assistant Professor of Psychology at George Mason University.The research was funded by the National Science Foundation through CBEN. AddThislast_img read more

Baker Institute expert ranks Texas counties from most liberal to most conservative

first_imgAddThis ShareMEDIA ADVISORYDavid [email protected] [email protected] Institute expert ranks Texas counties from most liberal to most conservativeJones: Travis County’s status as a clear liberal outlier should be of concern to Gov. Rick PerryHOUSTON – (Aug. 29, 2014) – Using data from University of Texas/Texas Tribune polls of registered Texas voters, Rice University political scientist Mark Jones ranked 20 counties in the Lone Star State from most liberal to most conservative. Travis County, home to Austin, is by far the state’s most liberal county; Brazoria County is the most ideologically conservative.Photo credit: thinkstockphotos.com/Rice UniversityJones outlined his rankings in a new Baker Institute blog, “The Texas counties: From most liberal to most conservative.” He is chair of Rice University’s Political Science Department and a fellow at Rice’s Baker Institute for Public Policy. Jones is available to discuss his rankings with the media.Travis County’s status as a clear liberal outlier “should be a source of concern for Gov. Rick Perry and his legal team, since the members of Perry’s grand jury and the members of any future trial (petit) jury are drawn from a pool of Travis County residents,” Jones said before Perry’s indictment by a Travis County grand jury earlier this month. In the blog, Jones noted that “this concern undoubtedly remains, with a very real potential prospect of Perry’s fate being once again placed in the hands of Travis County residents — this time, members of a trial jury.”While among these 20 counties there does not exist a true conservative analog to liberal Travis County, Brazoria County comes closest, Jones said. He found the Houston metropolitan region contains three of the four most conservative large counties in the state: Galveston County, Montgomery County and Brazoria County.Jones is a leading expert on Texas politics and has been quoted nationally about the 2014 race for Texas governor and other down-ballot races. He has also authored guest columns on these topics in Texas Monthly and the Texas Tribune.Rice University has a VideoLink ReadyCam TV interview studio. ReadyCam is capable of transmitting broadcast-quality standard-definition and high-definition video directly to all news media organizations around the world 24/7.For more information or to schedule an interview, contact Mark Jones at 832-466-6535.-30-Follow the Baker Institute via Twitter @BakerInstitute.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Jones biography: http://bakerinstitute.org/experts/mark-p-jones.Founded in 1993, Rice University’s Baker Institute ranks among the top 15 university-affiliated think tanks in the world. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute conducts research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows, Rice University faculty scholars and staff, coupled with its outreach to the Rice student body through fellow-taught classes — including a public policy course — and student leadership and internship programs. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog, http://blogs.chron.com/bakerblog.last_img read more