I’m 40. Here’s 39 Things I Still Don’t Know

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York It’s my 40th birthday. Like any monumentally important milestone, it got me thinking about who I am and what I know, who I thought I’d be by now and who I actually am. What, I wonder, do I have to show for 40 years on this green earth?But here’s the thing. The more I thought about it, the more I realized that the older I got, the less I knew. I’m less sure about things I knew for certain when I was 30. At 20, life was a no-brainer: get a degree, marry the guy, get the job, have the kids. By 30, I had the kids and had no time to think about anything – but I could still tell you that breast beat bottle, that children shouldn’t watch too much television and that being a mom is the be-all and end-all of my life’s purpose.And now, on the big day?I’m glad that I breastfed my kids, but no longer have a strong opinion about what others do. My children have probably watched more TV than is acceptable by my compatriots in the mommy mafia.And is being a mom fulfilling? Absolutely. But is it everything? Where do my kids end and I begin?The answer is I don’t know. And the truth is that there are a lot of things I still don’t know. I have learned a thing or two here and there. I’ve learned not to have any heroes. Heroes often let you down. But that it’s okay because I’ve disappointed myself and I’m learning to forgive all of us.I’ve learned that I don’t want to be a brand. I don’t want to be defined by the things I buy or the candidates I vote for. I don’t want to be locked into a belief system that is so rigid I can’t be open to learning new things.Now the things I don’t know far outweigh what I’m sure of. Here are 39 of them. Maybe I’ll find the answers by my 50th.What I Don’t Know by Age 40:What I want to be when I grow upHow to keep it that way after I clean the houseHow to meditateHow to save moneyHow to make meatloafThe lyrics to “Yellow Ledbetter”How not to cry when I’m angryHow to thicken my skinHow to achieve great eyebrowsHow to be a wife, mother, employee and human being simultaneouslyHow to not order a second (or third) glass of wineThe difference between an alligator and a crocodileWhether Pluto is considered a planet or notHow to do a cartwheelHow to not care what others think of meWhy women vote RepublicanWhat happens when you dieHow to fold a fitted sheetHow to wear a scarfHow to organize anythingHow to achieve balanceWhy I can’t just use the fancy towelsWhy I need a pocketbook when I have pocketsThe difference between foundation and concealer, and how to apply eitherHow to be in the momentIf ghosts are realHow to disagree amicablyHow to be satisfied with what I haveHow some people don’t drink coffeeOr don’t like chocolateHow to code (or what that really means)How to do a headstandIf God is realHow Trump got this farWhat happened at the end of the SopranosHow to get through Joyce’s UlyssesHow to pronounce “quinoa,” “acai” and “manicotti.” I only want to eat the last one.Why pot isn’t legalMy placelast_img read more

Jimmy Butler injury update: 76ers star’s groin strain ‘nothing significant,’ doubtful to play vs. Nets

first_img“In regards to what are we guessing or what are we thinking going forward, we really can’t make that prediction,” Brown said, via the Philadelphia Inquirer. “What we can say is that the MRI revealed, as I said, nothing significant.”Butler suffered the injury Monday in the first half of the 76ers’ matchup with the Pistons. He missed all three of his shots and grabbed four rebounds in 10 minutes of action before leaving the game. Related News Jimmy Butler underwent an MRI on Tuesday that revealed no structural damage to his injured groin, according to ESPN. But, he is still listed as “doubtful” to play in the 76ers’ next game Wednesday against the Nets.Philadelphia coach Brett Brown told reporters the “MRI came back favorable.” Jimmy Butler responds to 76ers star Joel Embiid’s comments about being frustrated with role Philadelphia acquired the 29-year-old forward from the Timberwolves in mid-November in exchange for a package centered around Robert Covington and Dario Saric. He has averaged 19.8 points and 5.2 rebounds in 13 games with the 76ers so far. Butler has also shot 48.7 percent from the field and 41.9 percent from 3-point range during his time in Philadelphia.The 76ers will enter their matchup with the Nets on Wednesday having won six of their last seven games.last_img read more

Long Branch Library Starts Delivery For Homebound

first_imgBy Liz Sheehan LONG BRANCH – As the Long Branch Free Public Library celebrates its 100th year, it has added a new service: doorstop delivery of books and other library materials to residents who are confined to their homes for medical reasons.“I see it as an important service,” said library staff member Kate Angelo. “Homebound people are part of the community.”Angelo, who now holds a Master’s of Library and Information Science from Rutgers University, said the new idea got a kick start when the library received a grant from the New Jersey Foundation for Aging in honor of one of the group’s trustees, Renee Sklaw, a lifelong resident and avid reader who frequented the library until she was homebound. Sklaw died in 2015. The grant opened a door.“That’s when we got the motivation,” she said.To qualify, patrons must have a library card or be able to present “an appropriate identification” in order to obtain a card.The city of Long Branch will provide the vehicle and fuel for the deliveries, and Angelo will make the deliveries with another staff member. There are several senior housing complexes in the city which would likely use the service, she said.Patrons can choose their own subjects by email or telephone. If they are unsure, the library staff can use a reader’s profile to learn the patron’s preferences and peeves in order to make recommendations. Every kind of circulating library material will be available, except for new DVDs.The Middletown Township Library also offers a homebound service program, with volunteers visiting residents’ homes with registration applications and books. Those interested in the program can go to the township library’s website or call 732-671-3700 for more information.The Long Branch library centennial is being celebrated this year. It was incorporated in 1916 and received a Carnegie Grant for $30,000 in 1917. The grant was used to construct the building at 328 Broadway which still serves as the main branch of the library, which has another branch in Elberon.Andrew Carnegie was a Scottish-American philanthropist and businessman who financed the building of 1,689 libraries in the United States as well as many others in other countries, including Ireland, England and Canada.There were 37 library buildings built in New Jersey with Carnegie grants, with 17 still remaining. In Monmouth County, in addition to Long Branch, Avon, Belmar and Freehold continue to use the Carnegie-funded buildings.For information on the program contact Kate Angelo at 732-222-3900, ext. 2270 or [email protected]last_img read more

Cape Town named SA’s Earth Hour Capital

first_img7 February 2014Cape Town has been named South Africa’s Earth Hour Capital in recognition of the city’s actions to address climate change, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) announced on Tuesday.The title is awarded as part of the global Earth Hour City Challenge, a collaborative effort between WWF and the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives which aims to highlight and reward cities that are prepared to make substantial long-term efforts to combat climate change.“We are exceptionally proud of Cape Town’s contribution to building a sustainable future that both protects the environment and improves the lives of citizens of South Africa,” WWF South Africa CEO Morne du Plessis said in a statement.Cape Town is one of 33 finalists competing for this year’s Global Earth Hour City title, from a total of 163 entrants, six of them South African.Once national Earth Hour Capitals have been chosen for each of the 14 participating countries, an expert jury will scrutinise the information supplied by finalist cities to identify the overall Earth Hour Capital.The grand title will be awarded at the Earth Hour City Challenge Conference and Awards Ceremony in Vancouver, Canada in March.Citizens of participating countries still have an opportunity to express their support for their favourite cities among the finalists through WWF’s “We Love Cities” social media campaign, which will run until 20 March.SAinfo reporter and World Wildlife Fund South Africalast_img read more

The New Congress vs. Green

first_imgPolitical theater is never in short supply in Washington D.C., but the new majority in the House of Representatives has been staging particularly exuberant – if, at this point, largely symbolic – displays of Republican policymaking, and Senate Republicans, though still outnumbered by Democrats, have been cheerfully pitching bills aimed at undoing many of the energy policies implemented over the past two years, including weatherization efforts and the Energy Star program.After the House majority voted to repeal the “jobs killing” health care law, conservatives in both branches prepared to roll out legislative proposals they say are grounded in tough-love fiscal prudence and a sensible aversion to burdensome regulations.Last month, for example, Senate Republicans unveiled legislation intended to thwart the Environmental Protection Agency’s regulation of greenhouse gas emissions – a set of regulations whose enforcement, the senators say, would hurt the economy. As noted in a recent story published by The Hill, the bill is designed to prevent the EPA from regulating the gases under the Clean Air Act and would prevent federal agencies from considering climate change when enforcing the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act.“Washington agencies are now trying a backdoor approach to regulate our climate by abusing existing laws. Congress must step in and stand up for the American people. My bill will shrink Washington’s job crushing agenda and grow America’s economy,” Sen. John Barrasso, a Republican from Wyoming and the vice chairman of the Senate Republican Conference, told The Hill.Cutting, slashing, burningEarlier last month, a group of conservative House Republicans known as the Republican Study Committee presented a proposal to cut federal spending by $2.5 trillion over the next 10 years – substantially more than the approximately $800 billion the House majority originally pledged. Some of those cuts would affect programs tied to the housing industry, including the government’s Energy Star program and its Weatherization Assistance Program. The committee is led by Rep. Jim Jordan, a Republican from Ohio.The Energy Star budget, for instance, would be cut by about $52 million annually, while the Department of Energy’s weatherization grants to states would be cut by $530 million annually. The Davis-Bacon Act, which requires payment of prevailing wages for public works projects, including the current, stimulus-funded edition of the Weatherization Assistance Program, would be repealed. Also, federal control of mortgage companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac would be eliminated, for a total savings of $30 billion, according to RSC calculations.As we said, a lot of this partisan arm-flapping, although no one should be surprised to see funding cut for a variety of useful programs as budget pressures grow ever more intense. We should note, though, that so far military spending, the mortgage interest tax deduction, and the major entitlement programs – Medicare and Social Security – have yet to be addressed with a major initiative by a House committee or by a conservative caucus in the House or Senate. But there’s still plenty of time, if not political will, for that.last_img read more

Rani Mukerji debuts baby bump

first_imgMumbai, Sep 13 (PTI) Actress Rani Mukerji, who tied the knot with filmmaker Aditya Chopra last year, has been pictured sporting a baby bump. The latest pictures, showing her baby bump in a floral maxi dress, however, confirm her pregnancy. Rani and the YRF honcho filmmaker secretly married in Italy on April 21, 2014. It is the first marriage for Rani, 37, while Aditya, 44, who is known to be a very private person, was previously married to Payal Khanna but they got divorced in 2009. In her 16-year-old career, Rani has given many hits including “Saathiya”, “Hum Tum”, “Veer Zaara”, “Bunty aur Babli”, “Black” and “No One Killed Jessica”. PTI PSH BKlast_img

Catch Up on the Latest Google Updates and Other Marketing Stories of the Week

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Google Updates Topics: Originally published Jul 1, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Just because you’re on summer vacation (or dreaming about it) doesn’t mean the internet marketing world is slowing down any. Nope! Bloggers are blogging, Google’s making announcements left and right, and Twitter’s working on raking in the big bucks.Not sure what I’m talking about? Well, good thing you’re here — this post will point you towards those stories and more, all from the internet marketing world this past week. Happy reading, and as always, share your favorite stories from this past week in the comments!Google+ For Tablets, Google+ Events, and Google Now Roll OutWe reported on the updates that came out of the Google I/O Conference on June 27. Two of the updates involved Google+, which of course had some marketers already rolling their eyes. But don’t write them off as insignificant yet! Google+ for tablets indicates that Google+ is becoming more and more accessible, and Google+ Events indicates that Google does, in fact, understand one of the primary uses of its rival social network. Both of these updates mean that people could migrate towards spending more of their minutes on Google+. The third update, Google Now, will allow Google to make suggestions based on mobile and search history. Creepy? Maybe. Useful? Definitely.Twitter Generating the Majority of Its Ad Revenue From MobileSpeaking of mobile, this story comes to us from MarketingLand, who reported that, according to the Wall Street Journal, Twitter’s mobile ad revenue is off the charts. The platform only launched mobile ads in April, but in three short months, the change has been huge. Let’s not forget that 60% of Twitter’s users are using it on a mobile device.Make Your Story 22 Times More MemorableThis story comes to us from MarketingProfs, who suggest that storytelling is key to making your facts more memorable. They cite a quote from cognitive psychologist Jonah Butler, who says that a fact wrapped in a story is 22 times more memorable than a pronouncement of a fact. This should reinforce a statement that’s been pronounced to death by marketers, including us: content is king. Content tells stories. Content is memorable.How to Infuse Your Writing With NostalgiaThe folks over at Copyblogger whipped up an excellent piece on a strategy to ensure the content you produce isn’t catering only to the present moment. Timeless writing, or writing that’ll envoke feelings of nostalgia or other emotion, lasts longer and is more memorable. As inbound marketers, we talk all the time about the importance of content, but it’s rare we delve further in and talk about the quality of the writing within the content.SEO, Digital Marketing and the World of Indie FilmsThis story from MarketingPilgrim brings together two things you might not imagine go together: search engine optimization and independent filmmaking. The piece transcribes an interview with One World Studios founder Zack Coffman, who knows a thing or two about both. We think this piece is well worth the read as an interesting case study, and should serve as a gentle reminder that there’s no industry exempt from the necessity of utilizing inbound marketing techniques in their digital strategy.What inbound marketing tales did you stumble upon this week?Image credit: anda (:last_img read more

Can You Ever Really Scale Social Media Marketing?

first_img Social Media Strategy Topics: Originally published Sep 13, 2013 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Alisa Meredith is the co-owner and inbound marketing strategist at Scalable Social Media, an inbound marketing agency in Wilmington, North Carolina. I (Corey Eridon, the editor of this here blog) hopped onto Facebook Chat with her for a conversation about whether it’s really possible to ever scale social media marketing.Me: Hi Alisa! Thanks for joining me today. We’re going to be talking about scalable social media … mostly because that’s your agency’s name, and the topic’s interesting. So tell me, how’d you get that name? Alisa: Well, honestly, it was chosen before I started with Scalable. The company was started by two people who owned franchise locations of Home Instead Senior Care. So, they decided to make something specifically for franchise locations that would be easily duplicated and customized. Or, “Scalable” Me: Oh that’s fascinating — I used to work at HQ for a franchise organization, and I’ve always found some franchises have a hard time with certain inbound tactics, because you have either too much control over the franchises, or too little. How do you coach franchises on that? Alisa: I know it can be a challenge for many. What I suggest is that they carefully review the franchise policies to see if they will have the leeway they need to make it work. We would get in touch with the corporate office to get a feel for their guidelines and make sure that we are working well to further their overall goals, as well as each individual office. Some will also have a home office telling them they needed to utilize social media, and it needs to be personalized — but all the solutions they looked at were very expensive. Me: So like many things, it can be uncomfortable at first, but with corporate buy-in social can work really well at the local level?Alisa: Absolutely. It’s true though — some franchises want to know EVERYTHING that will get posted before it goes up, and that can be really difficult.  We have also found that, of course, the corporate offices want to promote corporate content. Makes sense! However, we are more interested in promoting at the local level.  Me: So let me ask you a question about scaling social media marketing … is it really possible? Today, everyone wants to scale things so it’s efficient. And I get that. But social media seems to want to run in the opposite direction — personalized, one on one conversations. What do you think about that? Can we have both? Alisa: Yes and no. There is some limited value to having identical generic Facebook updates sent to many pages at once. I’ve seen this with home care agencies and independent pharmacies. It’s better than not doing anything at all! However, to really take advantage of social media’s strengths — relationship building, networking, and customer service, you really need to get personal. So, we’ve moved to a modified version of “scalable.”Me: What do you mean by that? Alisa: Well, we do find that it can be cost-effective for us and our customers when we focus on certain niche businesses. That way we have some knowledge of what works well going into it. We’ll work with lots of different types of businesses, but when we have several similar businesses, we are able to charge less for start-up and are able to show them good results faster.Me: So when you talk about scaling social but staying personal, is it about metrics-based decisions on where you spend your time on social?Alisa: Partially, yes. We have a better idea of what is going to work for them, we have people familiar with the industries right from the start, and we’re able to share ideas from client to client without making them carbon copies.Me: Do you ever have a hard time explaining the value of social to these businesses? Do you ever have clients that tend to think it’s just a waste of time? Alisa: Oh sure, but then I can just send my case study over, or tell them about my pharmacy customer who now gets more visitors from Pinterest than any other referrer. It’s also so important to stress that social media is not a miracle cure. If they have a sub-par product, bad customer service, or even a website not optimized for lead generation, it is a waste of time. Me: Wow, pharmacy customers rocking Pinterest? What’s your secret? Alisa: You “sell” the lifestyle, not the product. You watch what is popular, you network with complementary businesses on Pinterest, you make sure every page and post has a pinnable image, and you keep the great blog content coming. Oh, and group boards. Those help.Me: So if someone was just getting started with social media, and hadn’t found the opportunities to scale that you have, where would you tell them to start? Are there certain social networks that are easier to scale than others? Alisa: Well, that’s a tough one. It really depends on the audience of that particular company and where they go for their information. All things being equal though, I’d say Twitter.Me: Yeah I agree. Why do you say that? Alisa: Well, it’s so fast! You get almost instant results because it’s so easy for people to follow, retweet, and favorite. You can make it so easy to tweet your content from your blog. Also, because you can share the same content multiple times (perhaps changing your comment) because things move so fast — so you get more for your efforts. Me: Totally — and frankly, it’s way easier to scale content publishing and monitoring with Twitter. There are so many tools out there (Social Inbox, yes, but others too) that help people with limited resources bucket their time more wisely Alisa: Plus, people who are too big and important for you on Facebook or offline are much more likely to give you a look on Twitter.Me: Any other advice for people trying to scale social?Alisa: If you are trying to manage social media, and especially if you are doing so for more than one company, schedule your updates. Not all of them, but enough so that if you ended up not being able to post for a day or so for some reason, you wouldn’t leave things looking like a wasteland. But, if some local, national, or global news happens — remember to go in and adjust.Me: Yes, it’s those timely updates, supplemented with the evergreen posts, that make social media accounts look dynamic and human-run to me.Image credit: Jason A. Howielast_img read more

Should You Delete That? A Guide to Moderating Blog Comments

first_img Blogging Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack If you’re looking for a post that gives you the green light to delete those annoying comments you get on your blog, good news: This is the post for you.While some of the comments that make your blood boil will still be gracing your blog (see the section titled “Don’t Delete Even Though You Want To”), this post will explain which types of comments should be immediately deleted, and which ones you’re justified in deleting when you’re on the fence.Alright, ready to dive into the scary world of blog comments? Me too. Well, as ready as one can ever be.Definitely Delete1) Rude, Crude, and Offensive ContentEven if you didn’t write the rude, crude, or offensive content, you’re still responsible for ensuring it doesn’t live on your site. A couple years ago, we got an email from a blog reader who had stumbled upon an old post that was still receiving comments. She was writing to let us know that someone had left some unsavory content in the comments section, and that she thought we’d like to know — that was a truly appreciated email, because we didn’t want our site to harbor that kind of nastiness. Work hard to keep the filth off your site and rely on your community to help you monitor.Tip: You can try to pre-empt some of this by setting up commenter guidelines. Check out what the New York Times does — they go into a lot of detail on this page about how they deal with comments, and what they expect out of their commenters.2) Blatant SpamOf course, you should also get rid of obvious spam comments. You can use Akismet to block a lot of the spammy comments, but some will still get through. If you’re not sure what blatant spam looks like, here’s an example:And another:3) Secret SpamOoooh, what’s secret spam?!It’s a term I just made up to explain spam comments that, to the untrained eye, look like they might be legitimate. But they’re not. They’re spam written by someone with marginally more initiative than your garden-variety spam commenters. Here’s an example:Because the post on which the comment appeared was about brides, the comment kind of makes contextual sense. Except that it’s devoid of any actual content, and there’s anchor text pointing another website in a useless ploy to get inbound links. Other ways to identify secret spam include:Poor grammar (though this isn’t always an identifier … which you know if you’ve read any comments section, ever)Off-topic commentsOff-topic comments that find ways to weave in mentions of keywords that are only marginally related to the articleSometimes, it’s hard to tell the difference between secret spam and someone who just doesn’t know how to leave coherent comments, though — so you’ll have to use good judgment here. Which leads us to our next section … the gray area! (Who doesn’t love some confusing gray area?)Maybe Delete4) TrollersTrollers are people who leave comments on posts to try to get a rise out of either the author, or other commenters. The best practice for dealing with trolls comes down to one easy-to-remember phrase: Don’t feed the trolls. This means the more you engage with trolls, the bigger and stronger they become — that’s what they want! To get a rise out of you.So while some people would say you should definitely delete troll comments, sometimes this can incite trolls to get more aggressive with their commenting. As such, the best thing you can do with trolls is to just ignore their comments, unless it ventures into the rude, crude, or offensive bucket we discussed earlier.5) Another LanguageIf you’re getting comments in other languages, it’s hard to tell whether you should keep or delete the comment … because you can’t read it. If the comment looks like spam — the biggest hallmark would be links — go ahead and delete it. But it’s a good idea to plop the text into Google Translate to see whether the comment does contribute to the conversation. Who knows — you may have more international readers than you suspected!6) The Sales PitchSome comments are clearly someone in Marketing or Sales trying to get either leads, or an inbound link. Now, you may think these should be deleted because they’re completely self-serving, but sometimes, it’s just a commenter that’s trying to contribute who doesn’t know commenting etiquette. Consider the difference between this hypothetical comment:Check out http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/how-long-should-your-blog-posts-be-faqAnd this real comment:You see how that second comment is actually helping someone out, and it doesn’t seem like a Sales or Marketing pitch? Well technically, that first hypothetical comment could have been doing the same thing. It just seemed really spammy-looking. If you’re about to delete a comment because it seems like someone’s simply shilling their own products or content, take a second to assess whether they’re just out of tune with commenting etiquette. They might actually have something helpful to contribute that simply isn’t presented properly.Don’t Delete Even Though You Want ToRemember earlier, when I talked about the comments that make your blood boil? Yeah, sometimes you have to keep those.I know, life’s unfair.When a commenter is argumentative — either with you or another commenter — it can make you feel a little tense or even infuriated. But healthy discussion (healthy is the operative word there) is what makes your blog an interesting place to comment. Don’t delete the dissenters, even if you think they’re wrong. Best-case scenario: They are wrong, and other commenters chime in to make it clear. Worst-case scenario: They’re right, and you now have a comments section where smart people can actually hang out and teach other things.Not too shabby either way, eh? Originally published Jan 3, 2014 11:32:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics:last_img read more

How to Write a Blog Post Outline: A Simple Formula to Follow

first_imgHow to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow to choose the right imageCreating it on your own Finding images to use legally Optimizing the image for TwitterSizing images for TwitterTagging people in imagesUsing Photo Collages Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhat results they should expect to get How to Write a Blog Post How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow long their tweet should be with the image in itHow to actually upload an image to Twitter (This is a pretty basic step that someone would already know if they’re reading this post.)What sizes they need to make imagesHow they can create images on their ownWhere they can find images to use legally What sets a good image apart from a bad one on TwitterShould you tag people in imagesShould you use photo collagesWhat colors you should use to stand out (Don’t believe there’s hard data on this, just speculation. Let’s cut it.) 4) Add more takeaways to some sections. At this point, you should have a pretty weird looking outline. Mine is. Some sections have lots of little bullet points, others have only a few, and others have nothing. Now’s the time to fill in the holes. What did you miss in your initial brainstorm? Thinking about what’s missing is always hard, but it will help improve your final post significantly. Don’t forget to beef up your intro here, too. Have a great point you think would set the stage for the article? Add a little reminder below that section so you don’t forget it. Below shows how my outline’s evolved. I italicized all the things I added, and the outline is becoming closer and closer to being a post:IntroImages work really well on Twitter (find study) Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhich metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust your strategy to get better results How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow to choose the right imageCreating it on your own Finding images to use legally Optimizing the image for TwitterSizing images for TwitterTagging people in imagesUsing Photo Collageshttp://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/twitter-photo-collages-ideas-list  Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow they can generate a lead on TwitterHow often they should tweet images Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhat results they should expect to get (The study in the first part should cover this bullet point.)Which metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust the above to get better results Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow to generate a lead on TwitterHow lead generation fits in with the rest of your Twitter strategy How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow to choose the right imageCreating it on your own Finding images to use legally Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhat results they should expect to getWhich metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust the above to get better results Optimizing the rest of your tweetHow long the tweet should be with the image in Optimizing the rest of your tweetHow long the tweet should be with the image in Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow to generate a lead on TwitterHow lead generation fits in with the rest of your Twitter strategyReference Anchorman line: “Come and see how good I look.” 7) If any details come to you that you don’t want to forget, add them in. Last, but certainly not least, spruce up the outline with anything you don’t want to forget while writing. Maybe you’re writing the post right away — or maybe you won’t have time to actually start for a few more days. Regardless, having these details in your outline will make sure you’re not missing a thing. I do this often if I think of a terrible pun or pop culture reference while outlining … and trust me, that’s something I definitely wouldn’t want to forget. ;)Here’s my final outline: IntroImages tend to work really well on Twitter (http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/tweet-images-improve-lead-gen-ht)center_img Topics: Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow to generate a lead on TwitterHow lead generation fits in with the rest of your Twitter strategy Optimizing the image for TwitterSizing images for TwitterTagging people in imagesUsing Photo Collageshttp://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/twitter-photo-collages-ideas-list  Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhich metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust your strategy to get better results Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhich metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust your strategy to get better results How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow long their tweet should be with the image in itHow to actually upload an image to TwitterWhat sizes they need to make imagesHow they can create images on their ownWhere they can find images to use legally What sets a good image apart from a bad one on TwitterShould you tag people in imagesShould you use photo collagesWhat colors you should use to stand out Optimizing the rest of your tweetHow long the tweet should be with the image in What makes a blog post bad?There are lots of reasons a blog post could be less-than-perfect. Poor formatting. Poor grammar. Poor word choice. Poor shareability. The most pervasive problem? Poor flow. The post jumps from one idea to the next to the next and then circles around again for a split second to the first idea, then back to the fourth, and so on. Or the post reads like a stream of consciousness — but it wasn’t a stylistic choice. Luckily, you have a simple solution. Before diving headfirst into writing your post, you can create an outline. I’m not talking about jotting down a few quick bullet points — even experienced writers can go astray with just a few talking points. I’m talking a fully fleshed-out outline with enough details that make it virtually impossible for your writing to go off the deep end. And it’s pretty easy to do.Download Now: 6 Free Blog Post TemplatesBelow is my method for outlining posts and organizing my thoughts. You may prefer to switch up some of the steps depending on your writing style, but your end goal should always be to get an outline detailed enough that its result is a cohesive, logical piece. Here’s one way you can do that. 1) Nail your working title.This is the most important step of this entire process. You want to have a clear understanding of what you’re going to write before you start outlining. My colleague Corey wrote an awesome post about how to pick a great working title. Go read it, now. I won’t go too much into the weeds here (that’s why you should read her post), but a great working title is specific. It’s “How to Use Images to Generate Leads on Twitter,” not ” Twitter lead generation.”Spend time getting your working title to something specific and easy to tackle in a blog post format — but don’t waste time getting nitpicky. You can refine your title later. The goal here is to have a title that gives you a very clear idea of what the whole piece is about. You can make it sound catchy later.  2) Write down as many distinct takeaways from the article as you can.Next, you get to brain dump. Write down all the things you want your readers to get out of the article. These won’t always be the main sections of your article — it’s just all the things you want your readers to know by the end of reading your post.This is the only time in the whole process you’re not worried about organization — just let your ideas flow naturally. You need to get out all of your wild and crazy ideas now so they won’t muck up your post later in the process.Let’s use the previous example to show you what I mean. If my working title was “How to Use Images to Generate Leads on Twitter,” I’d probably want readers to know:What sets a good image apart from a bad one on TwitterWhere they can find images to use legally How they can create images on their ownWhat sizes they need to make imagesHow often they should tweet imagesHow to actually upload an image to TwitterHow they can generate a lead on TwitterHow long their tweet should be with the image in itWhat results they should expect to get Notice how these are really unfiltered and all over the place. That’s okay. We’ll wrangle it all in in the next step.3) Break up those takeaways into larger sections.Now, we’ll take that jumble of ideas and place them into overarching sections. Think of it like sorting laundry — each thought belongs to a different pile. From your brainstorm, you should come up with a few big themes. Sometimes, one of your brainstorming bullets will be a theme in itself, but usually several bullets will fall under one overarching theme. You may also realize that there’s a theme that you may not have any bullets for, but the post definitely calls for it. Lots of people recommend sticking to 3-4 larger sections, but it really depends on what type of post you’re writing. If you’re writing something that’s long and comprehensive, you might need more. If it’s a quick post, fewer sections would be ideal. But if you need a benchmark, 3-4 sections are fine. So if we’re writing that post about generating leads on Twitter using images, we’d bucket my ideas into the following buckets:IntroCrafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow they can generate a lead on TwitterHow often they should tweet images Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow to generate a lead on TwitterHow often they should tweet images Essentially, you’re re-doing the second step, but in a more controlled, organized manner.5) Revise, remove, and reorganize details in each section.Now comes the fun part: editing your outline. You’ve already done the hard part of actually thinking of your ideas. Now, you’re tightening up your outline to include only the most relevant information, revising the sub-bullets to actually make sense, and reorganizing the sub-bullets to tell the most logical story.First, let me show you what I’d cut — shown in bold. IntroImages work really well on Twitter (find study) How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow long their tweet should be with the image in itHow to actually upload an image to TwitterWhat sizes they need to make imagesHow they can create images on their ownWhere they can find images to use legally What sets a good image apart from a bad one on Twitter And that’s it! Once you have a solid outline, writing the actual post should be a breeze. Do you outline your posts before writing? What else do you include? Originally published May 5, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Ta-da! A much more comprehensive outline that makes your post easy to write.6) Include links to your examples and/or data.This is purely a time-saving trick. After you’ve fully fleshed out and then trimmed your outline, you should look for examples and data to support these claims. Once you find a source to support your arguments, just add them as a note underneath the section — that way, when you go to write it, it’s all organized for you.  Here’s what my outline morphed into. I grabbed the link for the Twitter study I wanted to reference in the intro and added a reference to an article we’ve written on Twitter collages.IntroImages tend to work really well on Twitter (http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/tweet-images-improve-lead-gen-ht) I cut things usually because the sub-bullet didn’t add value to the post or the reader would already know it. That’s a pretty good benchmark to remember if you’re not sure whether to cut something. Next, we’ll reorganize the remainder of the sub-bullets and rework them to sound like actual takeaways. We’ll also turn some of the sub-bullets into sub-sub-bullets. Here’s what this outline looks like now:IntroImages tend to work really well on Twitter (find study)last_img read more