Why You Need the Wired Wealthy

first_imgA growing number of people are giving even bigger bucks online.  A new study, “The Wired Wealthy” by Convio, Sea Change Strategies and Edge Research, looks at these major online donors in depth.  Read the full study below, or just check out these key points from the study:Major and moderate donors are generous and onlineThe e-mail files surveyed represent one percent of the membership but 32 percent of the revenue for this sector80 percent of the wired wealthy made donations both online and offline72 percent say donating online is more efficient and helps charities reduce administrative costs51 percent said they prefer giving online and 46 percent said that five years from now they will be making a greater portion of their charitable gifts onlineMost charity Web sites are missing opportunities to fully engage wealthy wired with their organizationOnly 40 percent said that most charity Web sites made them feel personally connected to their cause or missionOnly 40 percent said that most charity Web sites are inspiring48 percent felt most charity Web sites are well-designedEmail shows signs of lost opportunities to connect with various donors74 percent said it was appropriate for the charity to send an email reminding them to renew an annual gift74 percent said that an email from the charity about how their donation was spent, and what happened as a result would make them more likely to give again65 percent said they always open and glance at emails from causes they supportThree distinct groups of donors emerged based on the extent to which the donor sees the Internet as a source of connection between themselves and the causesRelationship seekers (29%) – the group most likely to connect emotionally with organizations onlineAll business (30%) – not looking for a relationship or emotional connection, but a smooth and simple donation processCasual connectors (41%) occupy the middle ground, showing some interest in sustaining an online relationship, but also wanting a smooth and simple processNonprofits should create and provide options that let the wired wealthy customize their online experience with the cause, says the study.last_img read more

10 Common Objections to Social Media Adoption and How You Can Respond

first_imgIt can be hard to convince leadership that working with social media doesn’t mean they’ve been paying you to catch up with friends on Facebook. You’ve probably heard some of the objections. But there are ways you can respond. Here’s a list of common objections, along with suggestions for countering them:1. I suffer from information overload already.Possible replies:Try just skimming messages in some fora. You may need to look closely at every email you get but you don’t have to look at every Facebook friend’s update.The right tools for you will feel helpful in time. Experiment for awhile with new tools and stick with the ones that deliver you the most high-quality information, whether those tools are high-quantity or not. (Thanks to Aaron Hockley and Ruby Sinreich for these thoughts.)Check out tools like AideRSS and FeedHub — just two examples of services aiming to improve the signal-to-noise ratio.Times change and so do information paradigms. Get used to it. The amount of information you had access to 3 years ago was infinitely more than people at any other point in history and we’re in the middle of another huge leap right now.2. So much of what’s discussed online is meaningless. These forms of communication are shallow and make us dumber. We have real work to do!Possible replies:Much of it is not meaningless, but if you feel overwhelmed with meaninglessness, try subscribing to a search for keywords in a particular service and using that as your starting point for engagement.Having a presence and starting a conversation is rarely a bad thing. Bring quality conversation to a space and you’ll find others ready to engage. (Thanks to Banana Lee Fishbones, obviously a fan of open, non-anonymous public communication for this articulation.)Personal information can be very useful in understanding the context of more explicitly useful information.If learning how the market feels about your organization, engaging with your customers and driving traffic to your web work — all very realistic goals for social media engagement — aren’t work, then I don’t know what is. Even in the short term, strategic engagement with online social media will have a clear work pay-off.3. I don’t have the time to contribute and moderate. It looks like it takes a lot of time and energy.Possible replies:If you aren’t going to eat that lunch of yours, I’d be happy to, thanks.With practice, familiarity, and technology fine-tuned with a little experience, you’ll find the time required will decrease.You might consider this time spent on marketing or communication with your existing customer base. Perhaps there’s something else in that department that isn’t working well and could be replaced with online work.4. Our customers don’t use this stuff. The learning curve limits its usefulness to geeks.Possible replies:You might be surprised to learn how many of your customers do use these new tools already. Even more will do so in the future.The best designed tools are designed like good games: you can get small rewards right away and then learn more advanced skills to win bigger rewards. Among online services that are intended for general audiences, only poorly designed ones are too geeky.Many of these tools provide value vastly disproportionate to the literal number of people they reach. These are like high-value focus groups where you’ll gather information and preparation to engage with the rest of the world.Try asking someone near you to give you an in-person demonstration of one of these tools. You’ll find it much easier to learn once you’ve seen the right paths taken to show what it can do.5. Communicators [bloggers, tweeters] are so fickle, it’s better to stay unengaged than risk random brand damage. We don’t want hostile comments left about us on any forum we’ve legitimized.Possible replies:If you need to, you can require that any comments left on your own site be approved before they appear. This slows down the conversation but if it makes conversation possible for you, then do it.There are far fewer people who will take the time to say hostile things, even on the internet, than you might imagine.Engage. You’ll be appreciated more for it. People are going to say what they are going to say. You can either let any criticism go unanswered or you can be the bigger person/brand for responding well.Conversations are going to happen online. It’s better to be engaged than to have it happening behind your back. (As articulated by Rick Turoczy.)It’s OK, no one believes that anyone is perfect anymore. Swing for the fences sometimes. You might strike out, but sometimes you’ll hit a home run.Even if you’re not responding publicly, you should watch closely so you know what people are saying. Maybe you don’t have a blog, but subscribe to a blogsearch feed or alert for your company’s name. Maybe none of your people are on Twitter, but you can subscribe to a feed for a search via Terraminds.6. Traditional media and audiences are still bigger. We’ll do new stuff when they do.Possible replies:They already are, from blogging to online video to social networks to mobile to microblogging. Big, established brands are already doing all of it. They may be experimenting, but they will bring all their market dominance into the most useful social media sectors as soon as it suits them. Will that be too late for you? It might be.Traditional media audiences are also more passive. Online audiences can engage with, rebroadcast, and otherwise amplify your communication efforts.7. Upper management won’t support it/dedicate resources for it.Possible replies:A lot of technology adoption has for some time had to happen despite this reality. People adopt new tools on their own at work, without permission. They discover powerful ways to solve their problems and then they share them horizontally.Compared to other expenses, meaningful engagement with new online technology does not have huge costs.8. These startups can’t offer meaningful security. They may not even be around in a year. I’ll wait until Google or our enterprise software vendor starts offering this kind of functionality.Possible replies:The skills you build and the connections you make will remain with you, though. This is a paradigm shift underway more than it is about any particular tool.Chose your tools carefully. Expect data export as an option so you can back up or switch services whenever you need to. This isn’t widespread yet but the best tools allow it.9. There are so many tools that are similar. I can’t tell where to invest my time so I don’t use any of it at all.Possible replies:A little experimentation goes a long way.Try asking people in your field who have some experience what tools they are using.Try searching for keywords related to your work in various sites. You’ll find out that way which sites are best suited for you.10. That stuff’s fine for sexy brands, but we sell [insert boring B2B brand] and are known for stability more than chasing the flavor-of-the-month. We’re doing just fine with the tools we’ve got, thanks.Possible replies:Some of these things — RSS and wikis, for example — aren’t passing social fads: they are emerging best practices and the state-of-the-art.ROI is very hard to measure, but try allocating a little energy over time to experiment and see what kind of results you get. From connections between people and projects, to search-friendly inbound links, to early access to important information, the benefits of engaging in new social media go on and on.ConclusionsThere are no conclusions. This is just a conversation. Please feel free to add your thoughts in comments and check out the comments to read what others suggest as talking points when faced with these objections.Source: ReadWriteWeb @ https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/C2060/IMG13684.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more

Going Beyond the E-Newsletter: Five Essentials for Crafting an Engaging Email Marketing Program

first_imgDo you have email newsletter fatigue? Maybe you’re struggling to find content for your monthly newsletter. Perhaps it’s just been tough to stick to a sending schedule. Or, maybe you’d much rather take a nap after hitting send than bother looking at those response numbers. Building loyal, engaged supporters starts with an engaging email strategy, so if you’re feeling a little fatigued with your newsletter (ugh!), there’s a chance your subscribers feel the same way (ack!).Join Suzanne Norman and Jim Hitch–our friends and partners at Emma–as they highlight the very best practices for crafting an engaging email strategy. From sign-up to send-off to follow-up, they’ll use nonprofit email examples to show you how to inspire at every turn. You’ll learn numerous tactics:    Growing your list    Developing fresh content    Working with your in-house team    Crafting stylish campaigns    Making the most of your response numbersAnd you’ll leave with everything you need to put together an email program that attracts, engages and inspires your audience. DOWNLOAD THE SLIDES BELOW “RELATED DOCUMENTS,” OR VISIT https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/B2046/IMG6468.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more

Four Tips on How to Use Email Marketing During a Down Economy

first_imgWhile the economic news may not be the cheeriest these days, we’ve got some good news for you about the return you’ll get on those email marketing dollars. The smart folks at the DMA (that’s the Direct Marketing Association) reported that in 2007, email marketing returned about $48 for every dollar invested, the highest of all the marketing channels out there.With the pittance it costs to send an email, you get all three of a marketer’s favorite things-relevant messages, brand appeal and the ability to measure it all. So keep up the great work you’re already doing with email, and consider these five tips as well:Use email to reduce other costs. On top of being cost-effective, email can help cut costs elsewhere. Look at what you’re currently printing-holiday cards, birthday postcards, invitations-and ask yourself, “Could this be emailed instead?” (Whoa, not out loud. There are better office nicknames than The Postcard Whisperer.)Save time, too, with trigger emails that automatically welcome new subscribers or follow up around important dates. When you’re no longer handling that stuff manually, you’ll have more time to focus on higher revenue, better service or more precise dart-throwing. Hey, we all have our priorities.Use email to get valuable information. Everybody’s crunching the numbers a little more diligently right now, looking for trends, patterns, or, in freak cases, practice with long division. Some of the most valuable statistics to watch are the response numbers that roll in after you send a campaign. A dedicated review of ’em will help you and your team spot stand-out content or subscribers who’d likely respond well to follow-up-all valuable information to apply to future campaigns.Use email to build brand loyalty. In a downturn, keeping your supporters happy and engaged is more important than ever. With regular email campaigns, you’ve already got an easy, friendly way to remind your subscribers why they know and love you. In your emails, make a point to highlight your organization’s best qualities. Reward your most loyal supporters with a coupon you had donated by a sponsor or send a special invitation to your holiday party. Oh, and be personal. The more your subscribers identify with you, the more likely they’ll be to support you.Use email the right way. As you refine your strategy to suit the economic climate, don’t stray off the path of email marketing’s best practices. It may be tempting to do something brash, like buy or rent a list. (Ick!) Or send every other day. (Ack!) Or even abandon your well-honed segmentation strategy for the ol’ “batch and blast” approach. (Blarg!)Keep your focus on a smart, permission-based strategy, and you’ll continue to see more value for your brand, your sending reputation and your results. Also, we’ve never heard “blarg” used like that.last_img read more

I just gave $336 to a stranger who knocked on my door…

first_imgI really did.It was this guy, a canvasser for Save the Children:I answered the door because it was 15 degrees outside, and I figured a canvasser holding a clipboard must be awfully dedicated to something interesting to be out on a night like this.He was raising money for Save the Children. Little did he know who he was getting behind my door — a professional fundraiser who might actually end up blogging his visit. But he was friendly and open and not too freaked out when I told him I knew all about Save already, but what I really wanted to know was why they were doing fundraising via canvassing. He said because it worked wonderfully. Most of Save’s child sponsors sign up via canvassers, apparently. Save is focused on this approach, scaling back TV ads and other broad-brush, less effective means of getting recurring, monthly gifts — a great gift that pays off for their programs many times, over time. It didn’t hurt that he added my neighbors had donated, too.Made sense to me. I just gave him my credit card number and a year’s commitment of $28 monthly gifts to sponsor a child in Africa. Oh, and a copy of my book and a pitch about Network for Good too, of course. And I made him pose for a picture.The lesson? Nothing beats the personal touch. I say this all the time, and I’m a skeptical marketer, but even I can’t resist it. A nice guy going door to door to personally and earnestly ask me to help a girl in Africa on a very cold night was just too personally compelling to refuse. Really. I’ve politely hung up on half a dozen fundraising telemarketers in the past week and thrown away ten pieces of direct mail, but this was too hard to turn down. And more rewarding as a yes. Well done, Save the Children. I’m not saying you need to hire a group of canvassers like Save to do face-to-face appeals, but do try to make your asks more personal. Get your volunteers to spread the word to their neighborhood. Or to hand-write your donor thank-yous. Helping children? Include their drawings in your communications. Encourage your supporters to tell their friends and family members why they love you. Or at the very least, segment that mass email campaign according to some audience groups smaller than “everyone on my mailing list.”last_img read more