UK roundup: Somerset CC scheme faces Extinction Rebellion protests

first_imgGlobal environmental movement Extinction Rebellion is targeting Somerset County Council Pension Fund with a protest outside the offices of Somerset West and Taunton Council on Friday 28 August at 12pm UK time, as part of its ‘We want to live…’ campaign.On a social media post, Extinction Rebellion said the protest is against Somerset County Council pensions committee’s continued investment in fossil fuels, despite the fact that the county council and four district councils declared a climate emergency in February 2019.The post claims that companies such as Shell and Exxon are planning to expand fossil fuel extraction significantly by 2030. “This is incompatible with the declaration made by Somerset County Council and the four district councils in Somerset to reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2030,” it said.Nearly 8% of of the pension fund’s £2bn (€2.2bn) assets are invested in companies that fuel the climate and ecological crises. These include companies like BP, Royal Dutch Shell, Rio Tinto and Exxon Mobil, Extinction Rebellion stated. The council’s pensions committee did not respond to IPE’s request for comment.Extinction Rebellion’s post also said the protest would be peaceful, non-disruptive and socially distanced.Similar protests will take place across the county – outside the district council offices in Bridgwater, Shepton Mallet and Yeovil – that day, and at other locations in the South West, the group announced.Aon: smaller bulk annuity transactions soarConsultancy Aon has said that favourable market dynamics in the first half of 2020 led to an increase in the number of smaller bulk annuity transactions relative to recent years.The first half of 2020 saw a near 20% increase in the number of smaller transactions – below £100m (€109m) – compared to the same period last year.The firm expects this trend to accelerate through the remainder of 2020, it said.Its analysis of the market and views from insurers show that several factors contributed to the favourable conditions for smaller transactions:Fewer jumbo transactions in the market compared to last year, which has meant insurers have had more capital and manpower to deploy across a wider spectrum of transactions;An increase in the use of streamlined auction processes for smaller transactions – which particularly helped during recent volatile market conditions;Insurers investing in technology and operational capacity at the smaller end of the market, to increase supply for smaller schemes looking to de-risk.Stephen Purves, partner at Aon, said: “There has been a misconception that smaller schemes struggle to access competitive pricing from insurers, so it is really pleasing to see them taking advantage of these market opportunities and transacting in the first half of 2020.”He said that several factors – including the impact of COVID-19, market volatility and an increased insurer capacity – have led to many more smaller transactions taking place.“This is particularly so when compared to recent years in which larger transactions have dominated – and maybe it has changed the perception of the sort of schemes that should and can come to market,” he explained.PLSA releases climate indexes guideToday the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association (PLSA) has published the Climate Indexes Made Simple guide, which is sponsored by MSCI, as is designed to help scheme trustees understand how climate change indexes work and how they can help mitigate risk and promote good stewardship.PLSA said that climate change is “becoming one of the most important long-term investment risk factors, meaning trustees have an increasing need to measure and manage climate risk and to build climate resilient investment portfolios”.At the PLSA Investment Conference 2020, pensions minister Guy Opperman made this clear when he said: “If you are in the pensions and savings business, you start with the fundamental principle that you believe saving should be done for the longer term. If you aren’t addressing climate change, there is no longer term. It is the defining issue of the 21st century.”In the guide, Remy Briand, head of ESG at MSCI, said that until now, measuring the potential impact of transitional or physical risks or the economic impact of climate change on portfolios was limited due to the lack of tools available to investors.“We believe climate change will become the most important investment risk factor over the long-term,” he added.To read the digital edition of IPE’s latest magazine click here.last_img read more

LADIES FOOTBALL: NEW COUNTY MANAGERS APPOINTED

first_imgTHE Donegal Ladies Board has announced new managers for its teams for 2014. Glenties man Sean Connaghan will take charge of the county U-14 team while Kenny Griffin from Mac Cumhaills will manage the U-16s.Another Glenties man, Christopher Molloy, will be in charge of the county minors this year. Letterkenny Gaels coach Maggie Foy will be in charge of the senior ladies team. They begin their campaign on the first weekend in February away to Laois.All the underage competitions will begin in March.The U-16 training has started; whilst the trials for Minors begin in Convoy this Saturday at 10am. Coaches should contact Sheila Campbell 087 2490154 for more details.The U-14 trials date will be announced shortly.  LADIES FOOTBALL: NEW COUNTY MANAGERS APPOINTED was last modified: January 16th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:LADIES FOOTBALL: NEW COUNTY MANAGERS APPOINTEDlast_img read more

53rd Logger Classic tips off today

first_imgIf the Loggers needed an early season opportunity to get right after a pair of winless tournament appearances to start their season then they need look no further than their yearly home tournament, the 53rd annual Logger Classic, which tips off today.Eureka (0-6) is coming off a disappointing run at the Arcata Invitational Basketball Tournament last weekend which saw the Loggers — then still without their full compliment of players as several starters were in the midst of football season — …last_img

Rain halts third ODI between India and Bangladesh

first_imgLike the first two One-Day Internationals (ODI), the third and the final match of the series between India and Bangladesh was also interrupted by rain at the Sher-e-Bangla National Stadium here on Thursday.India were reeling at 13/3 in 8.3 overs when the skies opened up with Cheteshwar Pujara and Manoj Tiwary batting at 3 and 0, respectively. Earlier, Robin Uthappa (5), Ajinkya Rahane (3) and Ambati Rayudu (1) got out.The visitors have an unassailable 2-0 lead in the series.Earlier, Indian skipper Suresh Raina won the toss and elected to bat against hosts Bangladesh in the third and final cricket One-day international at Sher-e-Bangla National Stadium.India have made two changes, bringing in R. Vinay Kumar and Manoj Tiwary for Amit Mishra and Umesh Yadav.The hosts have replaced Ziaur Rahman with Sohag Gazi.Teams:India: Suresh Raina (C), Robin Uthappa, Ajinkya Rahane, Cheteshwar Pujara, Ambati Rayudu, Manoj Tiwary, Wriddhiman Saha, Stuart Binny, Akshar Patel, Mohit Sharma and R Vinay Kumar.Bangladesh: Mushfiqur Rahim (C), Tamim Iqbal, Anamul Haque, Mithun Ali, Shakib Al Hasan, Mahmudullah, Nasir Hossain, Sohag Gazi, Mashrafe Mortaza, Taskin Ahmed and Al-Amin Hossain.last_img read more

Three pieces of fundraising advice

first_imgHere is my Fundraising Success column for June, featuring my alter ego, the maven.Dear Marketing Maven,My donations are down, my heart is heavy, and my job is on the line. Worse, I think I’m coming down with something. Paging Dr. Dollars!-Sick in SyracuseDear Sick,I don’t need a stethoscope to diagnose these ailments. You’re suffering from one or all of the three most common diseases in the nonprofit world. Sadly, they are at epidemic proportions. We’ve got to stop their spread!#1: “Field of Dreams” syndrome. Those who have this disease believe that, “If you build it, they will come.” By “they,” I mean a big team of generous donors. For example, if you have FODS, you think that if you build a website and stick a DonateNow button on it, donors will arrive and click. This disease also manifests itself as an assumption that uttering your mission statement will inspire people to give. If you find yourself saying, “If people only knew, they would” then you have FODS. Declaring your existence is not a fundraising campaign. It is a symptom of FODS.The cure? You need to reach out to people and build relationships with them. Then maybe they’ll want to support you.#2: “It’s all about us” disease. Nonprofits suffering from this disease are easy to spot — their home pages, emails and all of their correspondence reads like an “About Us” page. Sometimes, this ailment is called “Nonprofit Narcissism.” Mission statements, the history of your organization and other related details should not be found everywhere and do not constitute a strong message.The cure? Make it about your donor, not you. Why should they care? What can they accomplish? How have they changed the world with their support? #3: “Call to inaction” problem. In order to generate donations and increase your donor base, you need to have a clear call to action. It’s not enough to state who you are, what you do and what’s new. You need to clearly state what you are asking and appeal to prospective donors to take that action. “Save the earth” is not a call to action. Nor is “support us.”The cure? Be specific. As in, “Click this button and give us $10 for a bed net so a child will be saved from malaria.”Be well,MavenDear Marketing Maven,Our image is not what I want, so I’m thinking of rebranding with a new logo. Thoughts?-Making Over in HanoverDear Makeover,Bad idea. Branding is not about logos, it’s about how people perceive you. That’s got a lot more to do with how you treat them, how you conduct your programs, and how you communicate your achievements than it has to do with your logo. Don’t spend a cent on a new logo until you dig deeper into these aspects of your brand. Without that level of makeover, a new logo or color palette is about as effective as slapping lipstick on a pig. I don’t think it’s worth spending money on a logo change unless you conclude after fixing everything else that your logo is in direct violation of the brand you’ve built. Happy makeover,MavenDear Marketing Maven,Why did you not open my last eNewsletter?–Hurt in HalifaxDear Hurt,I get about 20 email newsletters a week. I read about two. I must have somehow overlooked yours – I’m sure it was worth a read, unlike the other 18. For what it’s worth, here are some thoughts on newsletters:1. Maybe you don’t need one.People are inundated with newsletters. I’m not the exception – we all get too many. Yawn. Why not put your time and energy into something truly exceptional? Like the packet a friend just got from DonorsChoose to thank him for buying a carpet for a classroom. He got a picture of the kids on the carpet – along with the students’ little handwritten notes and pictures. Wow. Not feasible, you say? How about simply sending out something useful to your audience? At Network for Good, we send out weekly free fundraising tips rather than a newsletter about us. Our nonprofits love it! If you’re an organization focused on diabetes, how about weekly tips for managing diabetes? 2. If you do an enewsletter, don’t forget the “e.”You can’t just slap your print newsletter into a PDF, email it, and consider yourself the editor of an “enewsletter.” Write to the medium. Online communications need to be shorter and formatted for the web. People skim online. They don’t read. Don’t make them download a PDF and turn pages on your computer. Grab attention with photos, short text and good stories. 3. Make it about the donors and not you.Don’t manifest “All about us” disease in your newsletter. Your newsletter should not be about how great you are. It should be about how great your donor is! Make your donor feel like the center of attention. No one can resist reading about themselves – or about what they accomplished.Write on,MavenStay tuned… more on email newsletters in next month’s column!last_img read more

Get Ready for Year-End Fundraising

first_imgFirst things first: Make sure your organization can accept online donations. Though you’re clearly getting on the ball by tackling end-of-the-year fundraising now, your donors may still put off “the big give” until the last minute. Make sure your donors have an easy-to- use, customized donation form that generates that vital tax receipt immediately – all without having to leave your website. (Don’t have a custom donation page? Contact us to try out our DonateNow service.) Make a plan.Tips 1-4 get right to the practical heart of your marketing strategy. Don’t forget to take a step back to plan ahead. Do you have year-end fundraising goals? Do you know who or what you’d like to highlight? What positive information and updates will you highlight for your audience(s)? And, maybe most importantly, what are your donors looking for – news, updates, stories, numbers/figures/results of a past campaign? Ask your audience what they need and want from you and deliver it! They’ll remember it when your well-crafted appeals start rolling in a few months.*Don’t believe that tax breaks are a major influencer? Network for Good processes 30% of its annual donations in the month of December, and the majority of that comes December 30 and 31. It’s not exactly a coincidence that this time is right before the tax-year ends! Nonprofit organizations can fulfill supporter’s desires for tax deductions just by being a 501(c)(3) (about.com has some info you can share with your potential donors about this). Get your story straight. Passion about your work is infectious, but too often fundraisers sap the emotion and color from our work when we seek to put it into words. We talk about our work in analytical ways when we should be speaking from the heart to compel people to action. Find out how to break out of this pattern and get the tools to help you write the right (brain) way every time. Determine the fixes/updates you can make prior to December to your organization’s website. Can you make your donate button bigger? Do you need to add a “why give” page? We’re not talking a website overhaul – just a few minor modifications you’ll be thankful for a few months from now. Check out these three steps you can take toward a better nonprofit website.  If your website is already up to par, and you’re ready to move on to social media, here are 11 Steps to Success (and 6 Things to Avoid) with Social Networking. Now is the time to focus on building stronger relationships with supporters to lay the groundwork for a big year-end giving season. By checking these items off your list now, you can strengthen the vital relationships that will set your organization up for a strong holiday giving season.Here are five tips to help you kick off your holiday fundraising now: Become friendly with an email marketing tool to communicate with your donors regularly – not just when you’re asking for money. And we’re not talking about Outlook. Giving your supporters content of value as it happens, rather than just at the end of the year will increase your donors’ feeling of investment in your organization, which leads to higher gifts.  An email marketing tool will also help you comply with CAN-SPAM laws, allow your supporters to easily share your information with a friend on social networks and generally keep them happy! (Want to send out great emails your can track and tailor? Get started with Constant Contact, an easy-to-use and affordable email marketing tool.) Supporters choose to donate to organizations for a variety of reasons. While most of the time you’re better off focusing on the emotional side of giving, at the end of the year data shows you  can get away with an appeal that’s focused on the financial side because people love tax deductions.* Photo source: Big Stock Photolast_img read more

7 Ways to Build Your Nonprofit Email List

first_imgMake sure that all your media mentions are driving people to your website (make it a call to action)!Create a strong email-address-collection device on your website. (NOT something lame like “sign up for our e-blast”) Give them an incentive or a reason to join. Give them a discount on an event. Give them an article you’ve written or tips for better living and then get their email address in return for your sending that gem to them.Optimize search. Make it easy for potential supporters to find you by optimizing your site for search. A lot of nonprofits are not taking advantage of Google Grants — find out how to get started with Google Grants.Collect emails from donors via direct mail. When they know it’s more convenient, eco-friendly and cheaper, most donors actually prefer to hear from you electronically. Whenever you send a paper mailing, include a way for supporters to opt in to your email list.Use your email signature. Your email is a great tool for doing marketing, whether it’s promoting an event or asking people to sign up to hear from you on your website. If people are forwarding your email, make it easy for them to opt in for your newsletter or updates on your mission.Ask people to sign a petition. Encourage people to get involved and share their email address, then get permission to contact them. If they’re moved enough to take action by signing a petition, these folks may be your most passionate supporters.Collect email addresses at events. I have been to 10 nonprofit events in the last 18 months, and I can’t think of a single one that collected my email address. Lost opportunity! Make sure you collect email addresses during your registration process and have a way at the event for people to sign up for regular updates. One of the most commonly-asked questions we get about online marketing is, “How do I build an email list?”  Building a quality email list over time is one of the most valuable assets a nonprofit can have. Email is still the primary starting point for people taking action online. Use these best practices to ensure that you are providing multiple opportunities for potential donors to join your nonprofit email list.last_img read more

A Four-letter Word That Won’t Get You into Trouble with Supporters

first_imgFor a sector defined by its lack of revenue (“nonprofit”), we sure talk about money a lot with our audiences–as in fundraising dollars, grants, special event tickets and so on.But what four-letter word do supporters want to hear? What model should you incorporate into your organization’s culture to better connect with supporters and potential supporters?Free.For all the money and engagement you’re requesting from supporters for tickets, donations and other expenses, one model for success your organization should consider is this: “inspire and connect now, reap all sorts of benefits-including monetary ones-later.”Here are few tips for getting “free” out the door and supporters to come strolling through it:Incorporate “free” into your branding goals and strategy.  Put yourself in your supporters’ shoes for a second. When they receive an email from your organization, what’s their first thought? “Oh, no, not another fundraising appeal!” Remember this: You do not dictate your brand-others do. Make sure your stakeholders are in a position to look at your nonprofit in a positive light. Organize events without a price tag (sure, you can accept donations, but don’t require them); send your supporters a recent news article relevant to your mission just because you think they’d be interested; let them know what services you provided your constituents because of previous generosity. These freebies allow you to put a face to your organization, as opposed to an open palm.Offer “freebies” on your website to empower your supporters to become your champions. Maybe you started Facebook page or Cause, and your base is growing. Great. Now what? Empower your groups members to do the work for you! Upload great content for your supporters to spread on your organization’s behalf. This approach is great for at least three reasons: one, you’re engaging your current supporters and cultivating your relationships; two, it’s cheaper than trying to reach new networks on your own; and, three, your supporters are giving more credibility to your nonprofit than you can. Add a section to your website and Cause page with great content: podcasts, videos, text to Tweet with (that’s info to post on Twitter), links, stories, etc. Make it as easy as possible for your message to go viral.Set goals that do not have *direct* revenue goals attached to them. As a fundraising, marketing, executive-directing guru, you want to see your returns on investment (who doesn’t?). Be sure to integrate some “free” initiatives into your marketing campaigns to achieve results other than direct donations: raise awareness about your cause or a timely event (a vote set to happen in your neighborhood, state, etc.), inspire volunteers and donors to act again, spread  your message, and get advocacy efforts of the ground. This is another relationship-building opportunity; your supporters are people, not ATM’s, so find out what types of activities they want you to offer.Become a media contact dynamo. Create some free content that helps establish your organization as an expert in your field. (You are one, right?) Publish an article or blog entry on your website. Share some research you’ve done. Start following relevant blogs and join in the conversations. The end result? You’re the media and blogger go-to when they need info about your topic. Note: We’re not advocating you go and yell your unsolicited message at people. Listen, react, converse, repeat.These four “freebie” strategies will strengthen relationships with various groups: donors, volunteers, advocates, the media and other supporters. Investing your energy and time now (yes, we realize those certainly aren’t free!), you’re much more likely to convert those relationships into donations later. Wouldn’t you be more likely to give a friend a dollar than a stranger? Be that empowering and generous friend to your supporters.Just a note: Though appealing for donations should not always be the centerpiece of your marketing efforts, you should always offer a way to donate if people want it. Keep that “Donate Now” button available everywhere! (Button-less? You can always contact us at Network for Good for more information about getting started online.)last_img read more