Jurors say arrogance and compelling evidence brought down Stanford

first_imgJurors in the recent trial of convicted Texas financier Allen Stanford say his arrogance and greed as well as compelling evidence by his former chief financial officer were primarily responsible for his conviction and the forfeiture of US $330 million in assets.The eight men and four women jury on March 6 found Stanford guilty on 13 of 14 counts. Two days later, the same jury decided that Stanford must forfeit US$330 million in assets in 29 bank accounts seized by the US government.Stanford was convicted of masterminding a “massive” US$7 billion Ponzi scheme by bilking tens of thousands of investors of high-yield certificates of deposit at his Antigua-owned Stanford International Bank (SIB).“The jury returned unanimous verdicts, and we think they speak for themselves,” Jury foreman John Wojciak, an environmental engineer, told reporters.Bruce Forrest, a 47, an alternate juror and optician, said prosecutors presented “overwhelming evidence” that resulted in Stanford’s conviction.He said the testimony of James Davis, Stanford’s ex-finance chief, was the most compelling.Davis, who made a plea deal with the US government, testified against his former boss for five days during the six-week trial.Forrest also recalled testimony from Sohil Merchant, Stanford’s information technology chief, who testified to having to repeatedly fly in laptops to replace ones the tycoon had smashed against walls or dropped into water.“There’s an arrogance that goes with that,” Forrest said, adding “and to find out he used other people’s money in order to accomplish all this. Along with arrogance comes greed”.Je, however, lamented that Stanford did not take the stand on his own behalf.“He might regret that now,” Forrest said. “It’s always nice to hear from him”.But another juror, Carlos Anez, 27, an industrial engineer, said it would not have made any difference if Stanford had personally testified, given the overwhelming evidence against him.“It was a lot,” he said, disclosing that the jury had briefly deadlocked on one count, the allegation that Stanford had bribed Antiguan banking regulator Leroy King with tickets for the National Football League’s final, “The Super Bowl”.King has also been indicted in the scheme and faces extradition from his native Antigua.Anez said jurors were unsure about the rules were in Antigua. Stanford was acquitted on that count.Stanford’s lawyers had unsuccessfully asked Judge David Hitter, who presided over the case, to delay the trial, claiming that their client was suicidal and might never sufficiently recover from a 2009 jail house beating by another inmate, to face a jury.In addition, defence lawyers claimed that Stanford was addicted to prescription anti-anxiety drugs and had spent almost nine months in a US federal prison hospital in North Carolina in a detoxification program.But Hittner ruled that Stanford was legally competent to stand trial.“That will be an issue,” said Ali Fazel, one of Stanford’s lawyers. “It will be a lengthy appeal.”Antigua Observer NewsRegional Jurors say arrogance and compelling evidence brought down Stanford by: – March 13, 2012 Tweet 14 Views   no discussions Sharecenter_img Share Sharing is caring! Sharelast_img read more

Dajuan Coleman plays season-high 21 minutes in improved performance against 49ers

first_img Published on November 25, 2015 at 6:33 pm Contact Sam: [email protected] | @SamBlum3 Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories Syracuse explodes for 14 3-pointers in 83-70 win over CharlotteGallery: Syracuse basketball improves to 4-0 by beating CharlotteStorify: Syracuse community reacts to 83-70 win over Charlotte in Battle 4 AtlantisFast reaction: 3 quick takeaways from Syracuse’s 13-point win over Charlottecenter_img PARADISE ISLAND, Bahamas — Dajuan Coleman walked off the court to a rousing ovation. More than eight minutes had come off the clock before his first substitution. His stat sheet was littered with two points, five rebounds, one assist and one steal. He’d only played 10 minutes against Elon on Saturday. He’d averaged just 12 through Syracuse’s first three games.On Wednesday, he was aggressive. After a steal, he drew a foul. After a block, he collected a rebound.“I thought Dajuan was good,” SU head coach Jim Boeheim said. “It’s the most active he’s been. He had a good start, good opportunity … a lot of minutes down and I think he was very productive.”Coleman’s night was cut short by foul trouble, but he had his best game since returning from a knee injury that kept him out for the better part of two seasons. He played 21 minutes, seven more than his previous season-high, and had seven rebounds, three assists and three blocks.He helped provide defense in a 17-0 run that spanned nearly seven minutes early in the first half as the Orange (4-0) went on to win 83-70 over Charlotte (1-3) at the Imperial Arena.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It felt good. It felt like I definitely had my legs,” Coleman said. “Maybe it’s the heat or something. I just felt real good out there.”On the first play of the second half, he blocked a Bernard Sullivan shot in the lane and immediately picked up the ball to get Syracuse possession. His defense sagged a bit to start the second half and he picked up the ticky-tack fouls that he said he’s trying to eliminate from his game.He was called for his fourth with 14:25 left in the game. But with Syracuse in control and a lengthy afternoon already logged, the big man wasn’t needed.After the game, he sat in SU’s makeshift locker room, content with how SU’s opening game in the Bahamas had gone.“I feel good,” Coleman said. “I think there’s still some things I need to work on, but I definitely feel like I’m on pace.” Commentslast_img read more

Kaino issue ‘not misconduct’

first_imgPhoto by: GETTY IMAGESCaption: Jerome Kaino needs time to sort out his family life but is not guilty of misconduct, accdording to New Zealand Rugby boss Steve Tew. Sidelined All Blacks flanker Jerome Kaino isn’t guilty of misconduct, but he needs to sort out his private life, New Zealand Rugby CEO Steve Tew says.Kaino’s absence from the All Blacks amidst allegations of an affair was raised as Tew fronted the news media to discuss the findings of the Respect and Responsibility report commissioned by the national body and unveiled in Auckland on Thursday.The All Blacks have been hit by two high profile issues off-field issues in the last year with star halfback Aaron Smith involved in a toilet tryst at Christchurch International Airport, and the Kaino affair allegations.Tew emphasised they were different cases.”Jerome … his is a very personal matter and it is a different piece of ground that I think tested the [review] panel and it tests us,” Tew said.”There is a moral issue around Jerome but it is very private. He hasn’t actually broken any All Black or contractual obligations and so at this stage we believe that the best thing for Jerome is to go away and sort his life out with his family and himself and come back to rugby when he is ready.”But at this stage we don’t believe he has done anything that we would consider to be misconduct under the terms of our contract.”All Blacks coach Steve Hansen believes the Jerome Kaino issue is a moral one, and not a matter of misconduct with NZ Rugby.The allegations against Kaino surfaced when he was in Sydney for the Bledisloe Cup opener for which he wasn’t selected. He left the All Blacks and wasn’t involved in the subsequent rematch with the Wallabies in Dunedin.While the All Blacks take on the Pumas in New Plymouth on Saturday, Kaino will make his return to rugby with the Auckland team.Smith is the subject of a second investigation into his “toilet tryst” after fresh complaints from the woman he was allegedly with.”In the Aaron Smith case, we are working through a process, we have someone independent looking at the new information that came to light. We are not wanting to rush that process, we think it needs to be done properly and then we will deal with it in the framework of the employment relationship we have with Aaron as we did the first time,” Tew said.Tew believed if the recommendations of the lengthy report are implemented, the next generation of All Blacks would be better equipped to deal with the responsibilities of their position.”They are addressed on a number of things in here (the report) on the long term because the next All Blacks will come through a programme where we are giving them better tools and better education to equip themselves to make better decisions,” he said.Tew explained the current process of dealing with incidents. The report revealed there had been 36 cases of misconduct investigated by NZR between 2013-17 (33 involving players, two a team and one a club). “The first thing we do is consider the nature of the allegation. If it is a matter for the police, then we normally step aside and just let the police deal with it. Then we will, come back in due course. There are times when we might consider suspending a player, if he’s a professional player, if the criminal offence is such that required that,” Tew said.”Then we work through our process. We treat each case on their merits, we normally set up a panel to hear the misconduct. The process is actually very defined in our collective [agreement].”It is very tricky. We know we are held to account publicly and that we know we have to send some really clear messages to the other players, but we are bound by the confidentiality of employment relationships and they are tricky.”Review chairwoman Kathryn Beck said her panel at looked at this and recommended that rugby look at its disciplinary performance management framework and make that a lot simpler to understand and follow.The eight-strong panel felt there needed to be “a very clear understanding that there will be consequences where people step outside was is the expected behaviour”.last_img read more