ND, SMC offer resources for mental well-being

first_imgMore than 25 percent of American college students were treated for a mental health condition in 2012, according to the American College Health Association. The 2010 National Survey of Counseling Center Directors reported counseling centers saw an increase in mental health issues on campuses.In an effort to respond to these trends and meet the needs of all students, both Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s provide resources for students experiencing mental illness.Dr. Bill Stackman, associate vice president for Student Affairs at Notre Dame, said the University’s goal is to provide “holistic care” that incorporates mental health issues into a larger conversation on well-being, including physical health and academic success.“Mental health and emotional well-being: it’s not a separate piece,” Stackman said. “It’s not like we’ll take care of the student over here, and then we’ll think of the emotional piece over here. It’s all integrated … [and] that emotional piece is often part of the conversation as we’re looking on how to support the student.”The University Counseling Center (UCC) is a key piece of the University’s support network, director Susan Steibe-Pasalich said. It provides free individual and group counseling, crisis services and self-help guides to undergraduate and graduate students and interested faculty and staff.Steibe-Pasalich said approximately 1,400 of the University’s 12,000 students used the UCC in the past year, an increase of almost 400 students over the past five years. She attributed the increase both to increased awareness of and need for campus counseling services.“Students are more comfortable with counseling,” Steibe-Pasalich said. “There isn’t that stigma that there used to be 10 years ago. Many students have already been in counseling when they come to college, so they have exposure to it. They feel comfortable with it.“Also, there are some students who maybe a decade ago wouldn’t have been able to come to college [but] because they had in high school some really good interventions, some really good diagnoses and medications, [they] are able to attend college, and they need support to be able to maintain that.”In response to the increased demand, Steibe-Pasalich said the counseling center expanded its services to include the Inner Resource Room, a room containing relaxation tools such as massage chairs and light therapy; Let’s Talk, weekly consultations about mental health issues open to all students; and programs and events with other campus organizations, such as the Gender Relations Center, Campus Ministry and Multicultural Student Programs and Services.She said the UCC also shifted its individual counseling services, which most counseling center clients use, to a brief therapy model, which provides temporary counseling and refers students to off-campus counselors and provides taxi vouchers if they need ongoing care.Steibe-Pasalich said the UCC also strives become more integrated with other services in St. Liam Hall, such as University Health Services and the newly-created McDonald Center for Student Well-Being.“We are looking to the whole health and wellness units,” she said. “All the departments in [St. Liam] are hoping to be more collaborative so that there is a continuity of care that would be seamless, so that wherever a student started out in this building, they would get the right place in an easy way. We’re looking at what are obstacles to that right now, nd how might we better serve the students in terms of the ease of that, so we’re examining that this year.”Steibe-Pasalich said the counseling center was ranked number one in 2013 on a comparison of National Senior Exit Surveys and consistently garnered positive feedback in student surveys.Junior Maggie Skoch, president of Notre Dame’s National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), said her own experience with the University’s mental health resources began with a visit to her resident assistant, who directed her to the counseling center.“The residence hall life here is much better than most schools at facilitating help for students who are struggling with not just mental health issues but any sort of issue, because it’s much more of a community with a good, trained staff that you sort of have a hierarchy to go to,” Skoch said. “… I think that’s very conducive to helping people who are struggling.”Skoch said the counseling center is a “great resource” for students.“They’re a wonderful, wonderful resource, especially in a nation where mental health coverage can be iffy and sketchy and difficult in terms of cost and availability,” she said. “This is basically free, and very excellent trained professionals at the snap of a finger. In that realm, they do a great job.”Steibe-Pasalich said the counseling center is heavily involved in another campus mental health resource, the CARE team, a group of individuals from various University organizations, including UCC, NDSP, Graduate Services and the Office of Community Standards.Stackman, the director of the CARE team, said concerned students, faculty, parents or hall staff refer students to the team if they notice a problem with that student’s well-being, including mental illness.Erica Kelsey, a case manager for the CARE team, said the team directs students experiencing mental health issues to the appropriate resources.“We’re sort of guiding students to resources they need,” Kelsey said. “So if we meet with them and it seems like they definitely need counseling services but haven’t yet been connected, then we’ll provide those referrals and then also following up with students as they go through the semester to see if are these referrals we set in place working for you, if there is anything else we can do to help.”Skoch said NAMI hopes to host or co-host more events in addition to Irish State of Mind and become more involved in student and administrative discussions on mental health issues. She said she also hopes to see more awareness of mental health issues and the resources to combat them in the future, as well as an effort to reduce stigma surrounding mental illness.“[There is] the classic, Notre-Dame-students-are-perfect-and-have-no-problems paradigm, which is ridiculous, and students are very aware that that mindset exists,” Skoch said. “This isn’t necessarily something that a policy would change, but it’s something to work on. Culture shift is another gap that we as a university could be emphasizing more.”Saint Mary’s senior Chloe Deranek is a social concerns member of Support a Belle, Love a Belle (SABLAB), the Saint Mary’s adaptation of Mental Illness Awareness week.“[SABLAB] is a week out of the year where Saint Mary’s comes together to bring awareness to Mental Health, end stigma and encourage students to take care of themselves,” Deranek said.Deranek said SABLAB aims to raise awareness about mental health issues that college students experience on a daily basis.Deranek said resources available on campus include Women’s Health, where counselors are available by appointment, and the Belles Against Violence Office (BAVO), which specifically handles issues related to sexual violence.She said Saint Mary’s students can also go to the counseling center at Notre Dame for help.“All of these sources work together to get students the help that they need,” Deranek said. “These places are all great starting points to come up with a plan to figure out what each individual needs.”Campus Ministry acts as another resource for students, and director of Campus Ministry Judith Fean said her office works with other departments if additional support or healing is appropriate.“All members of Campus Ministry assist students by being a place to share their story, listen compassionately and pray with and for those who are struggling,” Fean said.She said Campus Ministry provides several different Masses and prayer services throughout the year, a candlelight vigil for those impacted by sexual violence, a prayer service for hope and healing and Taize Prayer.Fean said the Eucharist is offered everyday on campus at least once, which provides students with an opportunity for spiritual support.“It invites students to gather with their joys, sorrows and hopes to celebrate with the Body of Christ, God’s compassionate love, healing and mercy,” she said. “Also, all campus ministers in the department offer spiritual guidance as they share their story, their fears and anxieties.Sophomore Clare O’Malley said she sought treatment for her depression by speaking with counselors at Women’s Health once a week.She said the counselors are available to those feeling stressed, anxious, depressed or simply in need of someone to talk to.“They will listen to you when you just need to talk and provide the positive voices to trump any negative ones in your mind,” she said.Additional resources include Project HEAL, a new organization on campus this year, and simply talking to a Resident Advisor, sophomore SABLAB committee member Elizabeth Murray said.“These resources are important because girls struggling need to know there is always someone on campus to confide in,” Murray said. “The people working in these offices are trained and have our health in their best interest.”Anyone struggling with mental health issues should contact:Womens Health at SMC: 50 Holy Cross Hall, 574-284-4805, whealth@saintmarys.eduUniversity Counseling Center, Notre Dame: Saint Liam Hall, 574-631-7336Belles Against Violence Organization at SMC (BAVO): 33 Holy Cross HallNational Hotlines: Suicide: 1-800-TALK, www.teenhealthandwellness.com/static/hotlines Tags: BAVO, Irish State of Mind, NAMI-ND, support a belle love a belle, UCC, University Counseling Center, Women’s Healthlast_img read more

Ben Platt & More Set For Off-Broadway’s Dear Evan Hansen

first_img Related Shows Broadway alum and Pitch Perfect fave Ben Platt will headline the off-Broadway premiere of Dear Evan Hansen. The new musical from Benj Pasek, Justin Paul and Steven Levenson played Washington, D.C’s Arena Stage last year, with Platt originating the title role. Tickets are now available for the production, which will begin performances at Second Stage’s Tony Kiser Theatre on March 26, with opening night set for May 1. The limited engagement is currently scheduled to run through May 22.Also returning for the off-Broadway transfer are Tony nominee Jennifer Laura Thompson as Cynthia, Rachel Bay Jones as Heidi, Laura Dreyfuss as Zoe, Mike Faist as Connor and Will Roland as Jared. Tony nominee John Dossett and Kristolyn Lloyd will round out the cast as Larry and Alana, respectively.Platt made his Broadway debut in 2014 in The Book of Mormon, reprising his performance as Elder Cunningham after taking on the role in the Chicago sit-down and national tour. His film credits include the Pitch Perfect films and Ricki and the Flash opposite Meryl Streep. Susan Blackwell stole his kite virginity.Thompson most recently appeared on Broadway in Nice Work If You Can Get It; her additional credits include a Tony-nominated turn in Urinetown, Wicked and Footloose. Jones, who recently starred in First Daughter Suite at the Public Theater, has appeared on Broadway in Pippin, Hair and Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. Dreyfuss’ Great White Way credits include Hair and Once. Faist made his Broadway debut in Newsies. Roland is a resident artist and board member at Studio42. Dossett earned a Tony nomination for the 2003 revival of Gypsy and has recently appeared on Broadway in Pippin and Newsies. Lloyd returns to Second Stage after appearing in Invisible Thread; her additional credits include The Liquid Plain and Heathers off-Broadway and The Bold and the Beautiful on screen.All his life Evan Hansen has felt invisible. To his peers, to the girl he loves, sometimes even to his own mother. But that was before he wrote the letter—that led to the incident—that started the lie—that ignited a movement—that inspired a community—and changed Evan’s status from the ultimate outsider into the somebody everyone wants to know. But how long can Evan keep his secret? And at what price?With a book by Levenson, lyrics by Pasek and music by Paul, the production, directed by Michael Greif, will feature choreography by Danny Mefford, set design by David Korins, costumes by Emily Rebholz, lighting design by Japhy Weideman, sound design by Nevin Steinberg and projection design by Peter Nigrini. Dear Evan Hansen View Comments from $89.00center_img Star Files Ben Platt in ‘Dear Evan Hansen’ (Photo: Margot Schulman) Ben Plattlast_img read more

February rains

first_imgFebruary brought copious rain to most of Georgia, drastically reducing drought conditions in all but the southeast corner of the state. Cloudy conditions associated with the rain kept temperatures near or below normal for the month.While final rainfall reports from across the state are not all in yet, February 2013 is likely to be one of the wettest Februarys on record for Georgia. Due to the wet conditions across most of the state, drought conditions were significantly reduced everywhere except in far southeast Georgia, where drought conditions persisted due to the lower rainfall. At the beginning of February, 12 percent of Georgia was in exceptional drought and 44 percent of the state was in extreme drought. Both of those categories of drought were completely eliminated by the end of the month due to the heavy rains, although some lingering longer-term drought conditions were still noted. The wet weather was caused by a front that stalled over central Georgia, concentrating rainfall from numerous passing low-pressure centers along a line through southern Georgia. The only areas of the state that received less than their normal amount of rainfall were the areas right along the Florida line on the Atlantic coast and the far northern counties, which were very wet in January before the nearly stationary front sagged south. The highest monthly total precipitation reported by National Weather Service stations was 12.87 inches in Macon (8.51 inches above normal), and the lowest recorded amount was in Brunswick, with 3.77 inches (0.30 inches above normal). Athens received 6.36 inches (21.88 above normal), Atlanta received 7.50 inches (2.83 above normal), Savannah received 9.75 inches (6.96 above normal), Columbus received 12.47 inches (8.03 above normal), Alma received 9.54 inches (5.74 above normal) and Augusta received 9.40 inches (5.48 inches above normal). Monthly records were set in Columbus, where the monthly precipitation reached 12.47 inches, surpassing the city’s 1961 record of 9.41 inches. In Macon, the city’s 1929 record for February precipitation, 12.04 inches, was broken with 12.87 inches of rain. Savannah also set a new monthly record of 9.75 inches, surpassing the 1874 record of 9.71 inches. A number of daily rainfall records were also set in February. The highest single-day rainfall reported by a Community Collarborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network station was 5.62 inches near Valdosta in Lowndes County on Feb. 25. Two other observers near Valdosta reported over 5 inches and a number of other nearby observers reported over 4 inches on the same day. The highest monthly total rainfall reported by a network station was 19.01 inches, observed east of Putney in Dougherty County. Another observer west of Sylvester in Worth County reported recording 18.87 inches of rainfall. Sixty-nine other CoCoRaHS observers reported more than 10 inches in February. An observer in Hiawassee in Towns County reported 4.0 inches of snow on Feb. 3, and a number of other observers in the northern part of Georgia reported snow on either that day or Feb. 19. While farmers welcome the end of drought conditions, February’s excessive rain made it hard for some farmers to prepare their fields. Localized flooding was seen in many places. Several rural school systems in southern Georgia had to close for one or two days because flooded roads made travel treacherous. The wet soils have delayed field preparation and planting of greenhouse plants but have also recharged aquifers, boosting prospects for a good growing season if farmers are able to plant soon. With all of the rain and clouds, February saw temperatures that were slightly cooler than normal. In Atlanta, the monthly average temperature was 46.6 degrees F (0.6 degrees below normal), in Athens 45.2 degrees (2.0 degrees below normal), Columbus 51.2 degrees (0.1 degrees above normal), Macon 48.4 degrees (1.6 below normal), Savannah 53.1 degrees (0.1 above normal), Brunswick 56.7 degrees (2.2 above normal), Alma 53.9 degrees (0.3 below normal) and Augusta 47.6 degrees (1.5 below normal). Isolated severe weather was observed on Feb. 12, 24, and 25, but no significant damage was reported from these storms.last_img read more

Springfield lands $110,000 ‘brownfields’ clean-up grant for Fellows site

first_img-30- Governor Jim Douglas has announced that $110,000 will be granted to the Precision Valley Development Corporation to continue clean-up activities at the former Fellows Gear Shaper property in Springfield. This proposal will help continue with the re-development of a critical downtown property, said Governor Douglas. This will not only help the town s economy, but will turn a blighted property into clean, safe commercial space, including space for the Springfield Hospital health center.These funds are being made available to PVDC from the State s Brownfield Fund, which will be leveraged with another $80,000 from the Southern Windsor County Regional Planning Commission s (SWCRPC) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) supplemental funding through the Environmental Protection Agency.Redevelopment of the site, located in Springfield s downtown, will result in the reuse of a historic building and provide new office and commercial space. The State of Vermont and SWCRPC are working very closely with the developers of the property, 100 River Street, LLC and the Springfield Regional Development Corporation.The Environmental Protection Agency has capitalized both the State s and SWCRPC s funds through its competitive brownfields Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) program.To date, the State has been awarded over $1.5 million for clean-up of brownfield sites; and SWCRPC has been awarded close to $3 million in RLF and assessment funding.Last year, the state awarded $750,000 to the town for use in installing new safety systems such as sprinklers and emergency lighting at the Fellows building, located at 100 River Street, and in 2008 the state authorized $344,731 worth of tax credits to help refurbish the historic building.For additional information about the Governor s Vermont Brownfields Initiative, please see the Agency of Commerce and Community Development website at: http://www.dhca.state.vt.us/brownfields/index.htm(link is external).Source: Governor’s office. 3.24.2010last_img read more

U.S. Experts Will Help in Investigation of Fire at Honduran Prison

first_imgBy Dialogo February 21, 2012 On February 16, the United States announced that it has sent forensic experts to collaborate with the investigation of the prison fire in Honduras that killed 355 prisoners, at the request of that country’s authorities. The experts are part of an international response team at the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) that collaborates on the investigation of large fires and explosions, a statement explained. “The ATF lead element of the team will arrive today (February 16) and begin reconstructing the scene, identifying the origin of the fire, conducting interviews, and sifting through debris to obtain evidence related to the blaze,” the agency indicated. The fire occurred between the night of February 14 and the early morning of February 15 in the Comayagua penitentiary, in central Honduras, which housed more than 850 prisoners, twice its capacity. Porfirio Lobo’s administration requested the assistance through the U.S. State Department. Other international experts are already collaborating with the Central American country’s authorities. ATF indicated that the response team, in existence since 1978, has already worked in Latin American countries on previous occasions, such as in Colombia, following an attack that killed 32 people at a nightclub in Bogotá, and in the Dominican Republic, where it recovered explosive devices in 2008.last_img read more

Police to Crackdown on St. Patrick’s Day Drunk Drivers

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau and Suffolk County police departments will be stepping up sobriety checkpoints across Long Island in anticipation of St. Patrick’s Day Weekend drunk drivers.Authorities across Long Island are taking precautionary measures in preparation for expected drunk drivers during the St. Patrick’s Day holiday weekend.Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano and Police Commissioner Thomas Dale said this week that additional officers will be searching for DWI violators as part of the police department’s “STOP-DWI” program, which will run through the holiday weekend.Suffolk police is also cracking down on drunk drivers. The department will disperse officers from all seven precincts and the Highway Patrol Bureau to county roads.“Drivers should expect to see increased enforcement on the roadways throughout the weekend,” Suffolk police said in a news release.New York State police said it will increase patrols beginning Friday and will add sobriety checkpoints throughout the Island. Police will also be keeping a close eye on anyone selling alcohol to minors.“We are starting our enforcement St. Patrick’s Day weekend with full knowledge there will be numerous parties and events where alcohol may be consumed, and we are asking everyone who drinks to designate a driver or arrange safe transportation in advance,” said New York State Police Superintendent Joseph D’Amico.Last year, troopers made 504 DWI arrest and issued 11,663 tickets.While it is common for people to drink in celebration of a holiday weekend, officials urge everyone not to be careless, and rather have an alternate plan in case of intoxication.“We want you to have a good time,” Mangano said. “However we ask that you make responsible and smart decisions during your celebrations, and plan accordingly so everyone can return home safely to their loved ones.”According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 31 percent of traffic deaths in the year 2010 were alcohol related. While drunk driving continues to be a national epidemic, Mangano and Dale said they are committed to bringing down that statistic.“There will be additional police patrols all around Nassau County,” Mangano said, “and chances are if you drive drunk you will be arrested.”last_img read more

Medford Woman Dies in Car Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 48-year-old woman died in a car crash in her hometown of Medford on Thursday evening.Suffolk County police said Debra Heitleband was driving a Toyota Corolla eastbound on Horseblock Road when she suffered a medical condition, drove up a curb and hit a tree at the corner of Route 112 shortly after at 5 p.m.Heitleband was taken to Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center in East Patchogue, where she was pronounced dead. She was driving alone at the time.Sixth Squad detectives impounded the car for a safety check while they are continuing the investigation.last_img

Avoid these mistakes in your disaster recovery strategy

first_imgHurricane Dorian continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrcenter_img Most organizations, credit unions included, have a disaster recovery and business continuity plan in place. A business continuity plan is critical to a comprehensive risk management program. It ensures that your employees are prepared should a natural or man-made disaster strike.As we progress further into hurricane season, it’s important that your credit union performs an audit of its current plan to ensure you’re prepared to serve your employees and members should inclement weather impact your business operations.Back in 2018, in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael, credit unions across the Alabama and the Florida Panhandle struggled to reopen their doors due to massive power outages. Frustrated members turned to social media to express their dissatisfaction with not having access to their cash or accounts. While credit unions cannot avoid disasters, implementing, testing, and revising a thorough disaster recovery plan can greatly reduce the negative impact weather catastrophes can have on your employees and members.last_img read more

Lineage Logistics set to takeover parts of Maines Paper & Food Service, memo says

first_imgOn Wednesday, 12 News reported Maines was laying off 119 employees due to “unforeseeable business circumstances” prompted by the coronavirus. (WBNG) — According to a Maines Paper & Food Service company email acquired by 12 News, Lineage Logistics is set to acquire assets of Maines the next several days. According to their website, Lineage is “an organization that is both deeply rooted in generations of cold chain expertise and on the cutting edge of technology and innovation.” Maines says its “confident” Lineage will support the growth of its business. Reading on our news app? Click here!center_img For more information, click here. 12 News reached out to Lineage Logistics for more information and is awaiting to hear back. The email says Lineage Logistics is the world’s largest provider of food distribution operating on multiple continents. Including locations near Buffalo and Rochester, N.Y.last_img read more

WHO voices new concern about avian flu

first_imgJul 8, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – In the face of new outbreaks, the World Health Organization (WHO) today expressed renewed concern about the implications of H5N1 avian influenza for human health and appealed for increased scrutiny of infections in animals and humans.The latest outbreaks in China and Vietnam, along with two new research reports, suggest that the virus is more widespread and may be more difficult to eliminate than was previously thought, the WHO said. The agency said its laboratory network needs virus isolates and clinical specimens from all the recent outbreaks so it can better monitor the circulating strains.As it has before, the WHO expressed concern that influenza A(H5N1) could acquire the ability to spread readily from person to person, which could lead to a global flu pandemic. In the widespread outbreaks in East Asia earlier this year, the virus jumped to humans, causing at least 34 cases and 23 deaths. But all the human patients apparently acquired the virus directly from birds.In recent weeks, new outbreaks of avian flu have been reported in Vietnam, China, and Thailand. No new human cases have been reported, however. Chinese officials have said they confirmed the presence of H5N1 virus in their outbreak.The WHO noted that a recent report by Chinese researchers indicates that the virus appears to be widespread in domestic ducks in southern China. The researchers also found that the virus has been causing increasingly severe disease, but that finding was based on tests in mice and may not have direct implications for humans, the WHO said. The article was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (see link below).Another report, published this week in Nature, “indicates domestic and wild birds in the region may have contributed to the increasing spread of the virus and suggests that the virus is gaining a stronger foothold in the region,” the WHO said. “These observations suggest that control of the virus may be even more difficult than thought in the spring.”The statement went on to say that known risk-management tools can control poultry outbreaks of H5N1 avian flu, though it may take months or years to control the virus completely. But the risk to human health is not well understood, and tools for assessing that risk are less developed, the agency said.It is not clear why, after circulating in Asia for several years, the virus has not picked up the ability to infect humans easily, the WHO said. The agency called for, and offered to help with, urgent “risk assessment activities, including surveillance in animals and humans, and strain analysis.””More knowledge of the virus could be acquired if WHO had full access to all virus isolates and clinical specimens from recent outbreaks,” officials said. “All H5N1 viruses are not the same, and how they differ could provide important insights.” For example, the avian flu virus in Indonesia differs slightly from those in Vietnam and Thailand, but the significance of the difference is unknown.The WHO said it is continuing pandemic preparedness efforts that were launched during the avian flu outbreaks earlier this year. The agency is collaborating with scientists and the pharmaceutical industry to monitor changes in the virus’s susceptibility to antiviral drugs. In addition, two US vaccine manufacturers have produced a supply of trial vaccine for pandemic flu. Samples from recent outbreaks would help the WHO assess the adequacy of the strain used in the pandemic vaccine, officials said.The WHO also said:Governments should provide human flu vaccinations to workers who cull poultry to control outbreaks.Everyone exposed to infected birds should be provided with antivirals.Human trials of experimental pandemic flu vaccines should be accelerated.See also:Jul 8 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2004_07_08/en/Abstract of study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Scienceshttp://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0403212101v1?etoclast_img read more