MEP Calls for Stronger EU Commitment to Hold Population Census in

Brussels – Socialist MEP Gilles Pargneaux on Wednesday called for “stronger commitments” from the European Union to hold a population census in Tindouf camps, southwestern Algeria.In a statement to MAP, he praised the call of EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini, for a population census in Tindouf camps, deeming this census as a “key to solve the Sahara dispute”.   The status-quo has lasted for more than 40 years, and humanitarian aid embezzlement has been ongoing for years, he added. Because of the urgency for action, EU should take concrete diplomatic actions to hold this population census, Pargneaux said, stressing that only after holding census that “a sustainable and viable political solution can be achieved”.  The 2007 European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) report revealed the existence of networks involved in large-scale embezzlement of the international humanitarian assistance, and noted that the aid was extended on the basis of inaccurate figures, since no census of the population has ever been conducted.With MAP read more

UN chief appeals for calm amid deadly intercommunal clashes in southern Guinea

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today called for calm and urged Guineans to follow the law amid reports of deadly fighting between ethnic groups. “The Secretary-General is deeply concerned about reports of violent intercommunal clashes in southern Guinea, resulting in heavy loss of life and property,” according to a statement by his spokesperson. In the statement, Mr. Ban urged national and community leaders to ensure the security of persons and property, to uphold the rule of law and to pursue the path of dialogue with a view to addressing any concerns among the communities. According to media reports, dozens of people have been killed as a result of the fighting in the country’s second-largest city, Nzerekore, and the surrounding forest region near the border with Côte d’Ivoire.Mr. Ban also urged Guineans “to refrain from all acts likely to undermine peaceful coexistence among communities and human rights,” according to the statement. He also stressed the importance of maintaining conditions conducive for peaceful and democratic legislative elections to be held as scheduled on 24 September of this year. In March, protests in the West African nation related to the long-delayed polls led to several deaths and hundreds of injuries. At that time, both Mr. Ban and the UN human rights office appealed for calm amid the violence and urged political actors in Guinea to pursue dialogue to create conditions for peaceful elections. read more

Keep those BBQs lit theres another sunny summery weekend ahead

first_img(Image: Rainfall Radar/Met Éireann)WELL WOULD YOU look at that – not a cloud in the sky today and guess what? The weekend is looking much the same!Met Éireann has forecast “dry, settled weather over the weekend with further long hours of sunshine through both Saturday and Sunday”.Temperatures are set to reach the low 20s in many inland areas, but light onshore breezes will keep it slightly cooler near the east and south coasts.As we reach into next week, the weather gradually becomes more unsettled with temperatures set to drop back to more normal values and outbreaks of rain – but we can worry about that next week.For now, it actually feels likes summer, so there’ll plenty more days in the park like this:People sunbathing in St. Stephens Green, Dublin. (Image: Sam Boal/Photocall Ireland)Or even just catching a few rays, wherever and whenever you can, like this:Office workers enjoy the sunshine in Grand Canal Square, Dublin. (Image: Sam Boal/Photocall Ireland)Read: 8 sentences that you will overhear on an Irish sunny evening>More: Brrr! This spring was one of the coldest on record>last_img read more

Poland To Introduce Recyclable Subway Car In 2012

first_img2012 may the year of the apocalypse, but it’s also the year of the recyclable subway car. In two years the country, with help from partners Siemens and BMW, is planning to introduce a new type of subway car that is 97.5 percent recyclable.Called the Inspiro, the train features an aluminum chassis designed to be much lighter than traditional subways, and also much more spacious to accommodate better passenger flow. It also features a demand-controlled air conditioning system and electrodynamic braking, which, when coupled with the lightweight design means that the Inspiro requires less energy to run, and could potentially reduce energy consumption by up to 30 percent for the Polish subway system.AdChoices广告By the end of 2013 it’s expected that 35 of the trains will be in service, with nearly 40 percent of the manufacturing materials being sourced locally.Via Treehuggerlast_img read more

PASOK on top in local government elections

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Greece’s ruling PASOK party won the majority of regional run-off elections on Sunday but turnout was a record low across the country.The second round of elections, which also heralded the introduction of a new streamlined system of local and regional government, saw PASOK win eight regions while the main opposition New Democracy (ND) party won the remaining five.PASOK won the regions of Eastern Macedonia-Thrace, Attica, Northern Aegean, Western Greece, Crete, Southern Aegean, Peloponnese and Sterea Ellada while ND triumphed in the regions of Western Macedonia, Epirus, Thessaly, Ionian Islands and Central Macedonia.The second round of elections saw Athens and Thessaloniki elect Socialist mayors after years of being New Democracy strongholds.Yiorgos Kaminis, who was backed by ruling Pasok and part of the Left, will be the new mayor of Athens, with 52% of the vote. Nikitas Kaklamanis, the outgoing mayor, backed by main opposition New Democracy (ND) accepted the result gracefully and offered to assist Kaminis whenever the need arises.Things were not so clear cut in Thessaloniki, where, with all votes counted, Pasok-backed Yiannis Boutaris (50.2%) defeated the ND candidate Constantinos Gioulekas (49.8%) by just 419 votes. Gioulekas has already asked for a recount. In Piraeus Vassilis Mihaloliakos (ND) will be the new mayor with 51.83% of the vote, defeating Yiannis Mihas (Pasok) by over three percentage points. In Patras, independent candidate Yiannis Dimaras established his victory with 53.63% of the total vote.As regards the number of municipalities won by each party, PASOK won 73 municipalities, 49 municipalities by itself and the rest in cooperation with the Ecologists and the Democratic Left.Main opposition party New Democracy won 41 municipalities, the Communist Party of Greece (KKE) one (Petroupoli), and the Radical Left Coalition (SYRIZA) also one in cooperation with the Ecologists and six in conjunction with the Democratic Left.The Ecologists Greens won one municipality in cooperation with SYRIZA, three with PASOK, two with the Democratic Left and eight in cooperation with PASOK and the Democratic Left.Lastly, the Democratic Left won six municipalities by itself, two with the Ecologists, six with SYRIZA, eight with PASOK and the Ecologists and 14 with PASOK.However the results have been skewed by 54% abstention, the highest ever recorded in Greece.last_img read more

Public meetings for week of July 1

first_imgMondayPort of Ridgefield, 111 W. Division St.• 11 a.m., special meeting: Real estate discussion. Action will be taken.Vancouver City Council, City Hall, 415 W. Sixth St.• 4 p.m., workshops: Recession request of Sadri Mill Plain development agreement, amendments to city shoreline master plan and an update on the Heights District subarea plan.• 7 p.m., regular meeting: Public hearing on Fifth Plain Creek Station annexation.Camas City Council, City Hall, 616 N.E. Fourth Ave.• 4:30 p.m., workshop: Clark County Homeless Action Plan, Camas Urban Tree Program, parks and recreation growth assessment.• 7 p.m., regular meeting: Mayor’s Volunteer Spirit Award.Port of Camas-Washougal, 24 South A St., Washougal.• 5 p.m., public meeting; Art walk discussion, airport business plan.Woodland City Council, Council Chambers, 200 E. Scott Ave.• 6 p.m., executive session.• 7 p.m., regular meeting: Authorize franchise with Verizon, Lift Station No. 5 upgrade. Workshop on fees and charges to follow.Yacolt Town Council, Town Hall, 202 W. Cushman St.• 7 p.m., regular meeting: Amboy Avenue short plat application, rotate mayor pro-tem, rotate finance committee.TuesdayClark Public Utilities, 1200 Fort Vancouver Way, Vancouver.• 9 a.m., public meeting.last_img read more

Premier revels in victory in judgment on 12 storey development

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppThe People are well deserving of the opportunities the development will bring said the Premier, Hon Dr Rufus Ewing in a media statement today issued to express TCIGs gratitude in the ruling of the Chief Justice.CJ Margaret Ramsay Hale ruled in favor of the Government which argued that indeed consultation was sufficient and with changes to the Planning Policy, the wind was knocked out of the sails of the plaintiffs in the case.The Tuscany and the Venetian owners argued that their properties were adversely affected by the policy changes which would enable the 12 storey development to go forth and that consultation was anything but wide. I quote the Government’s release:  “However, the Government was and remains satisfied that consultation was in fact widespread and that interested persons were given ample opportunities and means to communicate and engage with the Government on the proposed amendments via stakeholder meetings, email, letters as well as through public town hall meetings.”Those policy changes which give the Governor and Cabinet greater power in deciding on what can or cannot be built in the TCI also increases the permissible height of apartments, condominiums and hotel buildings and increasing the density of the number of bedrooms per acre and based on the type of development in certain areas on Providenciales.  Grace Bay, Turtle Cove and Northwest Point are among the areas named in the amendments. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:CJ Margaret Ramsay Hale ruled in favor of the Government, ruling goes in favor of government in 12 story development, the tuscany and venetian strongly against 12 story grace bay developmentlast_img read more

Vuzix Blade testdrive The return of the CES smart glasses

first_img 0 CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show. 14 questions CES 2019 has to answer: The issues dominating the tech landscape. 12 Photos CES 2019 1:57 The Blade will work with prescription lenses, too, but I haven’t been outfitted with lenses yet. These lenses will let the Blade work as a pair of functioning everyday prescription glasses, at an extra price (with prescription lenses, the total cost comes to around $1200). The Blade kinda sorta works over my own glasses, but it’s not designed to work well that way. I had to reposition where the display floats in my eyes, and also, I ended up looking even more ridiculous.The glasses work as a phone accessory, like a smartwatch. I paired it to my iPhone and used Vuzix’ phone app to set up the system and connect to Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. The Blade’s Bluetooth connection was really buggy during early tests, dropping out a lot. Once connected, it can show notifications from my phone, use the Blade as a music playback remote, and take photos and videos. (Android phone owners can respond to messages with quick replies.) The Blade has a little red LED that lights up to show when you’re taking photos of people — a much-appreciated attempt to stop Glasshole creepshots. The Blade floats its single-eye display into the right lens using waveguides, which allows the glasses to stay compact. The area where the image is projected has a greenish-iridescent square etched into the lens, which is otherwise normally transparent. The visuals were larger than I expected and very crisp and clear. Text floats and is easily readable in normal light, and games and apps with graphics display clearly, too, but with some ghostly semitransparency that comes with the smart glass/AR headset territory. Sarah Tew/CNET What can you do with these? That’s the question, isn’t it? The answer for now: not all that much. The Vuzix Blade has apps, and a few preloaded games use the onboard gyroscope to work head-turning into a tank battle or dinosaur hunting. The Blade’s head-turning sensitivity isn’t perfectly synced, though, which started to make me nauseous. A karaoke app with three preloaded songs encouraged me to sing along to The Girl from Ipanema, which was absurd. But besides being $1,000 karaoke smart glasses, the easy-to-read heads-up display suggests other uses for assistance and closed captioning. Epson’s smart glasses have already been put to use to add captioning for the deaf for theater productions. I could see the Vuzix Blade being a useful tool for similar purposes, if someplace had the budget. It also points to a future in which assistive smart glasses could be as easy to use as wearing a device that pairs like a smartwatch. The Vuzix Blade is an Android device, running off a quad-core ARM processor. It has a 720p/8MP video camera/still camera, and a microSD card slot for expandable storage. Technically, this is a potentially versatile little wearable computer.vusix-blade-15It pairs with a phone, like a watch. Sarah Tew/CNET But the Blade needs to stay better synced, and be easier to use…and find a purpose through apps. Amazon’s Alexa app, which I got to try for a few moments in an early build, shows search results and plays audio once I paired Bluetooth headphones (the Blade doesn’t have in-headset speakers, or a headphone jack). Similar display-connected wearable assistant glasses could easily do the same in the future. Amazon has enabled wearables and headphones to hook into Alexa, and the Blade would be the first pair of Alexa glasses. Google Assistant support is also in the works, and both will function as apps that use the onboard noise-cancelling microphones. But the apps still aren’t available for me to try on my prerelease pair, so stay tuned for deeper thoughts. Still, the clear downside with the Blade is navigation. You need to tap and swipe the Blade’s thick side arm, much like the old Google Glass. It works, but it gets tiring. These smart glasses haven’t conquered easy control. Gyroscopic head-turning controls and voice commands could help, but they weren’t always put to great use. And that alone, regardless of price and purpose, could be the Blade’s biggest downfall. Still, the Blade doesn’t even go on sale until late January, so these impressions are with early, prerelease software.I’ll update with more thoughts when final software is available. 16 Photos Tags The Blade does, at least, look sort of like regular glasses. I was wearing contacts when I slid on the thick black Vuzix Blade glasses, after charging them up and pairing them to my iPhone. They made me look like a cyberpunk dad, or maybe an art gallery owner. Post a commentcenter_img Alexa-connected smartglasses are here, with Vuzix Blade Wearable Tech Share your voice Test-driving Vuzix Blade on my face before CES CES Products Alexa Augmented reality (AR) The most interesting PCs, laptops and tablets of CES 2018 The Vuzix Blade was promised back at CES 2018: The Alexa-connected smart glasses, which I demoed then, were like an updated Google Glass that promised a larger screen and assistant modes. The Vuzix Blade is now the first product I’ve gotten a chance to test in 2019. So far, what I’ve realized is that smart glasses are really here.Whether or not they’re useful is another story. First of all, these $999 glasses aren’t really designed for you at all. Vuzix says the glasses are aimed at businesses, or those with impairments that might benefit from pop-up hands-free assistance. This has been the pitch with previous smart glasses and Google Glass-like devices, too, and Vuzix is already focused mainly on enterprise uses for these types of headgear, like the headset the company made with Toshiba that I briefly wore last year. Now playing: Watch this:last_img read more

Anil Ambaniled Reliance Group shares surge after Supreme Court verdict on Rafale

first_imgSubsidiaries of the Anil Ambani-led Reliance ADAG surged on the stock market on Friday after the Supreme Court refused to intervene in the $9 billion Rafale fighter aircraft deal.The stocks of telecom major Reliance Communications (RCom) and infrastructure giant Reliance Infrastructure (RInfra) were the most active, touching new intra-day highs on a day when BSE Sensex and NSE Nifty traded range bound.The top court dismissed a host of petitions seeking a court-monitored inquiry into various aspects of the deal to buy 36 Rafale medium multi-role combat aircraft for Indian Air Force from French aviation giant Dassault.The petitioners had challenged the pricing of the aircraft, the way the terms of the deal were changed, and the selection of Dassault Reliance Aerospace, a joint venture between a Reliance ADAG company and Dassault, to fulfil the offset partner clause in the deal.Market reports show that shares of RInfra and RCom gained between 4 per cent and 6 per cent after the court order which was also a huge relief for the Narendra Modi government. Earlier, Reliance ADAG chairman Anil Ambani had hailed the verdict. “I welcome the judgment of the honourable Supreme Court today summarily dismissing all PILs (public interest litigation) filed on the Rafale contracts, and conclusively establishing the complete falsity of the wild, baseless and politically motivated allegations levelled against Reliance Group and me personally,” he said in a statement.”We remain committed to India’s national security and to making our humble contribution towards the Make in India and Skill India policies of the government in the critical area of defence including our offset partnership agreement with our valued partner, Dassault Aviation of France.”The market seems to have picked up from the company’s confidence following the Supreme Court order.RCom shares rose 6.66 per cent to touch an intra-day high of Rs 16.49 per share on the BSE, after opening flat at Rs 15.40 against previous closing price of Rs 15.46, market reports said.On the National Stock Exchange, the company was trading at Rs 16.05, an increase of 4.22 per cent.The shares of RInfra shot up 2.93 per cent to trade at Rs 295.20 on BSE. Reliance Power was up 2.14 per cent at Rs 28.65, and Reliance Capital was up 1.04 per cent at Rs 218.95.last_img read more

5 injured in US school shooting

first_imgParents communicate with police officers at a roadblock near Salvadore Castro Middle School in Los Angeles, California on 1 February 2018. AFPFive persons were injured in a classroom shooting at Salvador Castro Middle School in the US city of Los Angeles, officials said.A 15-year-old boy who was shot in the head was in critical condition and a 15-year-old girl who was shot in the wrist was in stable condition, Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) said on Thursday, Xinhua news agency reported.“We had some type of a shooting occurrence inside a classroom,” said L.A. School Police Chief Steve Zipperman during a press briefing at the scene.The shooting was reported to police around 9 a.m. on Thursday morning. Police rushed to the scene and conducted room searches at the campus.Three others, including two children and 30-year-old woman suffered minor injuries which were not caused by the shooting.A handcuffed girl was seen being taken into custody by police and referred as a “person of interest” by Zepperman.Police officials said the shooting suspect is about 12-year-old and the weapon of the shooter has been recovered by police.Police officials told reporters that they don’t know the exact number of students on the scene when the shooting happened and it is still too early in the investigation to determine the motive of the suspect.There was a heavy police presence at the location and the campus was on lockdown. A lot of anxious parents and relatives were waiting outside the campus.All of the parents of the victims have been notified, said authorities.Salvador Castro Middle School has a total enrollment of 428 students and 22 full-time teachers.last_img read more

Forecasters Expect Busier Atlantic Hurricane Season Due To El Nino Fading

first_img Share Government meteorologists say this year’s hurricane season may be busier than initially expected now that summer’s weak El Nino has faded away.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center said Thursday the Atlantic season looks more active than normal as peak hurricane season begins. Forecasters now expect 10 to 17 named storms, with five to nine hurricanes and two to four major ones.NOAA’s *Updated* 2019 Atlantic #HurricaneSeason Outlook now calls for: 10-17 named storms of which 5-9 could become hurricanes, including 2-4 major hurricanes.But remember: #ItOnlyTakesOnehttps://t.co/QkQV4lugRb pic.twitter.com/tZL9Hu0922— NOAA (@NOAA) August 8, 2019In May, they forecast a normal season, one or two fewer named storms and hurricanes.Forecaster Gerry Bell says the end of El Nino means more hospitable hurricane conditions. El Nino is the periodic warming of parts of the Pacific that affects weather worldwide and dampens storm activity.Hurricane season is June through November. So far, there have been two named storms, with one hurricane.last_img read more

Modi misleading farmers says CM

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on Friday alleged that Prime Minister Narendra Modi was not furnishing true information just to create confusion among the farmers.Participating in the Question Hour in Bengal legislative Assembly, she said: “The Prime Minister is deliberately furnishing false information to create confusion among the farmers.”Addressing a farmers’ rally in West Midnapore, Modi had said that the supporting price of paddy has gone up by 50 percent, while in reality it has gone up by Rs 200. He had also that said the farmers’ income will double by 2022 and the infrastructure of 22,000 rural markets all over the country will be upgraded. In June, the retail price rise of paddy has gone up by 5.7 percent, which is highest in the past five years. The supporting price of Jute has also gone up, giving benefits to the farmers. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeReacting sharply, Banerjee said: “At a time when 12,000 farmers have committed suicide all over the country, there has not been a single such case in Bengal.” She said the income of the farmers has gone up three times in the state in the past few years.She said that she had requested the Centre to increase the credit limit of the farmers to Rs 2 lakh. “I have requested the Centre to increase the credit limit of the farmers to Rs 2 lakh, against the existing amount of Rs 20,000 to 40,000. With this meager amount, the farmers cannot do anything. But they have not listened to me and now are shedding crocodile tears for the farmers.” Banerjee said that the farmers are looked after properly in Bengal and their families are getting benefits of various schemes taken up by the state government.State Food and Supplies minister Jyotiproyo Mullick said till July 25, 31,700 lakh metric tonnes of rice has been procured. Around 4.53 lakh farmers have sold the paddy. There are 480 direct purchasing centres (DPC) and 420 central purchasing centres.last_img read more

Elekta Presents Informationguided Cancer Care Better Information Will Transform Cancer Care

first_img Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Technology Reports View all 9 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Women’s Health View all 62 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Information Technology View all 220 items SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Sponsored Content | Videos | Information Technology | September 26, 2014 Elekta Presents Information-guided Cancer Care – Better Information Will Transform Cancer Care Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Find more news and videos from AAPM. Elekta Presents Information-guided Cancer Care – Better Information Will Transform Cancer CareElekta’s software vision for the future is image-guided cancer care.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:34Loaded: 4.52%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Syria war tipping Mideast balance toward Sunnis

first_img The difference between men and women when it comes to pain Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day Top Stories Iran is also facing increased pressure over its nuclear program, which the United States and its allies believe is intended to produce nuclear weapons. Tehran denies the charge. The U.S. has hiked up sanctions, hitting Iran’s vital oil revenues and straining its economy. Israel has talked of military strikes against Iran’s nuclear facilities.The Shiite militant group Hezbollah, meanwhile, still holds a dominant position in Lebanon. But even that is being challenged.Only a few years ago, Hezbollah’s leader Nasrallah had emerged as a hero even among many Sunnis across the Middle East after his fighters battled Israel to a near stalemate in a destructive 2006 war in southern Lebanon. But his backing for Assad has tainted him among many across the region, and among opponents at home. Regional news channels like Al-Jazeera no longer carry his speeches live and in full as they once did.Nasrallah, perhaps in search of relevance, warned on Friday in an 80-minute speech of a harsh and punishing response by Iran if it were attacked by Israel. He warned that if Israel should attack Lebanon, his guerrilla group with its rocket arsenal could turn the lives of millions of Israel to “real hell.” Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix Associated PressBEIRUT (AP) – Not long ago, Arabs everywhere listened when the leader of Hezbollah spoke. Sheik Hassan Nasrallah’s prominence, bolstered by his Lebanese guerrilla force’s battles against Israel, was a sign of the rising regional influence of Shiite Muslims and overwhelmingly Shiite Iran. Now, his speeches don’t necessarily make front pages even in Lebanon.The change is emblematic of how the bloody conflict in Syria, now in its 18th month, has brought a shift in the Middle East’s sectarian power balance. For much of the past few years, Shiites were surging in power across the region, based on the central alliance between Iran, Syria and Hezbollah, with close relations to Shiites who took power in post-Saddam Hussein Iraq. Comments   Share   The “Shiite bloc” has suffered a number of reversals amid the Syria conflict.The Palestinian militant group Hamas moved its political leadership out of the Syrian capital Damascus, costing Assad the leverage he had long enjoyed by hosting the group. Now Hamas, which had long received Iranian largesse, has shifted allegiances to energy-rich Qatar, which is also a backer of Syria’s opposition.Iraq, where the Shiite majority rose to power following Saddam’s 2003 ouster, is firmly in Iran’s sphere of influence, but the Shiite-led government there is isolated, facing serious challenges to its authority from the Sunnis and Kurds, who between them combine for some 40 percent of the population.Attacks blamed on Sunni militants there have further eroded the government’s authority. Sunni-led Arab nations, particularly Saudi Arabia and Qatar, continue to shun the Baghdad government because of its ties with Iran and its perceived marginalization of Iraq’s Sunnis.Saudi Arabia and its Gulf allies last year also banded together to help crush an uprising by Bahrain’s Shiite majority demanding greater rights under the tiny Gulf island nation’s Sunni leadership. The uprising _ which threatened to turn into an Arab Spring-style revolt _ raised Saudi fears of greater Iranian influence on the doorstep of eastern Saudi Arabia, site of much of its oil resources and the center for its Shiite minority.center_img But now the region’s Sunni-led powers are appearing more confident, encouraged by the prospect that the Sunni-led rebellion could bring down Syrian President Bashar Assad’s regime, dominated by members of the Shiite offshoot sect of Alawites. Assad’s fall would cost Iran a priceless foothold in the heart of the Arab world. Hezbollah would lose a bastion of support and a conduit via Syria for vital Iranian weapon supplies.Already, Iran and Hezbollah have seen their reputations damaged by their support for Assad in the face of the uprising.“Iran’s influence in the Arab world has taken a big hit recently,” said Alireza Nader, a Middle East expert from the Rand Corporation. Iran’s and Hezbollah’s support of the Assad regime, he said, contradicts their support for Arab Spring revolts elsewhere. “This policy makes Iran, and Hezbollah, appear cynical if not hypocritical.”Further boosting the Sunnis, the wave of uprisings around the Middle East since early 2011 brought greater political influence to Sunni Islamists, particularly the Muslim Brotherhood, in Egypt and Tunisia.The announcement Saturday that Egypt’s new, Muslim Brotherhood-rooted president, Mohammed Morsi, will visit Iran on Aug. 30 _ the first such visit by an Egyptian leader since the mid-1970s _ likely reflects the growing confidence that Iran’s status is damaged and that Sunni Arab nations can steer the agenda. Arizona families, Arizona farms: providing the local community with responsibly produced dairy Rami Khouri, director of the Issam Fares Institute of Public Policy and International Affairs at the American University of Beirut, says Hezbollah is no doubt making preparations for survival without Assad to support it.“Hezbollah has to face a really huge challenge if the Syrian regime falls, but I cannot imagine a group like Hezbollah waiting for this to happen and not actively preparing itself for that eventuality,” he said. “But it is clear that both Hezbollah and Nasrallah have lost some stature as a result of the Syrian conflict.”(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Sponsored Stories How Arizona is preparing the leader of the next generation Egypt has long shunned Iran and in recent years, former President Hosni Mubarak had joined with Sunni powerhouse Saudi Arabia in touting Tehran’s growing influence as the main threat to the Middle East. Morsi, who was elected this year in the wake of Mubarak’s ouster, has called for Assad’s removal and last month pledged Egypt’s “protection” of what he called Saudi Arabia’s “guardianship” of Sunni Islam against outside threats, a thinly veiled reference to Iran.But at the same time, Morsi’s Brotherhood has suggested it is aiming for a new policy of engaging with Iran and influencing it. During a recent visit to Saudi Arabia, Morsi proposed the formation of a contact group of Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran and Turkey to mediate a solution in Syria. The proposal may have been largely symbolic, but Brotherhood officials touted it as a return of Egypt’s regional impact “that it had lost under Mubarak.”“Sunni Arab countries are pushing back to make up for the losses they suffered after 2003,” said prominent Iraqi analyst Hadi Jalo. “With the civil war in Syria and the isolation of the government in Iraq, the Shiite tide is retreating.”last_img read more

AP Photos Nigeria celebrates Afrobeat legend Fela

first_img Top Stories Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Sponsored Stories Arizona families, Arizona farms: working to produce high-quality milk 0 Comments   Share   Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvementcenter_img Men’s health affects baby’s health too Through the haze of marijuana smoke, top artists in Nigeria, including Asa and Tiwa Savage, performed on stage. Most raised their fists above their heads, mirroring the famous image of the singer who called for pan-Africanism and human rights in his country when many were cowed into silence by a string of military rulers.Fela created Afrobeat in the late 1960s, mixing the rhythm of jazz, the catchiness of pop music and traditions of African mysticism into 10-minute-long songs riffing on politics and sex in a nation only recently freed from colonialism. Many in Nigeria, at times a very religious and conservative nation, largely shied away from Fela over his heavily publicized sexual appetite and marijuana use. However, the singer has received more attention in recent years following a smash Broadway musical about his life.Fela died in 1997 of complications brought on by AIDS.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix Associated PressLAGOS, Nigeria (AP) – Nigeria celebrated the memory of late Afrobeat legend Fela Anikulapo-Kuti this past week as his family put on a series of concerts featuring singers and artists channeling his funky style.Felabration, as the concert series is known, began with the opening of the Kalakuta Museum, which offers a glimpse of how Fela lived in his former home. Thousands came to the New Afrika Shrine, the performance hall where his son Femi Kuti performs each week. 4 must play golf courses in Arizonalast_img read more

Rep Leutheuser takes oath of office receives committee assignments

first_img16Jan Rep. Leutheuser takes oath of office, receives committee assignments Categories: Leutheuser News,Leutheuser Photos The 98th Legislature convened for the first time on Wednesday, Jan. 14, with all 110 Representatives, including the new state lawmaker from the 58th House District, Eric Leutheuser, taking the oath of office. Leutheuser was joined by members of his family.“I’m extremely honored to have the opportunity to serve the people of Branch and Hillsdale counties,” said Leutheuser, R-Hillsdale. “I look forward to working with my colleagues on important issues so we can keep Michigan on the path to a brighter future.”Rep. Leutheuser has also received his committee assignments. Leutheuser will serve as the vice chair for both the House Elections Committee and the Financial Liability Reform Committee.  Additionally, Leutheuser will serve on the House Committee for Commerce and Trade as well as the Communications and Technology Committee.“Now is the time to keep Michigan’s economy moving in the right direction,” Leutheuser said. “I’m excited to serve on these committees, and am eager to take a look at the tough issues facing our state and how we can make this a better place for everyone to live.”The 58th District includes Branch and Hillsdale counties. Residents can contact Rep. Leutheuser at (517) 373-1794, by email at EricLeutheuser@house.mi.gov or online at repericleutheuser.com.###last_img read more

House passes Callton Lyons legislation improving patient access to medical marijuana

first_img Categories: News Access to medical marijuana will be safe and simple for Michigan patients through a two-bill package that passed the House today to clarify and update the existing statutes.The legislation implements ideas developed at lengthy workgroup meetings that included patients, caregivers, law enforcement, health care providers and officials from cities, villages and townships.House Bill 4209, sponsored by Rep. Mike Callton, redefines what are known today as dispensaries as “provisioning centers” with guidelines to dispense marijuana in a clean, regulated environment.“People traditionally think of marijuana as a liberal issue, but this is a conservative bill that improves local control, said Rep. Callton, R-Nashville. “Furthermore, this isn’t a criminal matter, it’s a health care issue. In fact, the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that states with access to medical marijuana have 24.8 percent lower opioid overdoses.“As a medical professional, I recognize that patients who suffer from some of the worst conditions—epilepsy, cancer, chronic pain—need safe treatment options that give them relief without fear of criminal prosecution.”Rep. Lisa Posthumus Lyons’ House Bill 4210 allows patients to use non-smokeable forms of marijuana, such as tinctures and other liquid forms more suitable for health treatment of children and the elderly.“This issue is not about whether you support medicinal marijuana or not; Michigan voters decided that on the 2008 ballot proposal,” said Rep. Lyons, R-Alto. “This is about ensuring safe access to medicinal marijuana and allowing patients to use alternative forms to smoking that are more healthy and effective for them, especially children and the elderly.”Since the 2008 legalization of medical marijuana for Michigan residents, there have been numerous court cases that have created inconsistent definitions of “useable marijuana,” which has resulted in uncertainty, unintended consequences and actual prosecution of patients with legal medical marijuana cards.“It is absurd that patients and parents face prosecution for using the treatment method that best meets their medical needs,” said Rep. Lyons. “The bottom line here is that we need to implement these common-sense measures to ensure patients have safe access to medicinal marijuana.”The bills now move to the Senate for further consideration. 07Oct House passes Callton, Lyons legislation improving patient access to medical marijuanalast_img read more

Rep Calley plans local office hours in April

first_img02Apr Rep. Calley plans local office hours in April Categories: Calley News State Rep. Julie Calley welcomes residents to office hours in three communities during April.Calley, of Portland, will present a legislative update and then meet with residents one on one regarding their concerns on the following dates:Monday, April 16, from 11 a.m. to noon at the Village of Lake Odessa, Page Memorial Building, 839 Fourth Ave., Lake Odessa;Monday, April 16, from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Barry County Courthouse, Commissioners’ Chambers, 220 W. State St., Hastings; andMonday, April 30, from noon to 1 p.m. at the Village of Middleville, 100 East Main St., Middleville.“Accountable representation requires consistent feedback,” Calley said.  “Office hours present an opportunity for productive dialogue with those whom I serve.”No appointment is necessary. Residents unable to attend scheduled office hours may send their questions and ideas to Calley via email at JulieCalley@house.mi.gov or by calling her at 517-373-0842.last_img read more

Rep LaFave calls for additional school safety measures

first_img Categories: LaFave News 23May Rep. LaFave calls for additional school safety measures New plan allows teachers to carry pepper spray, TasersState Rep. Beau LaFave today introduced a plan giving teachers additional options to protect themselves and their students while on school property.LaFave, of Iron Mountain, said his legislation would allow teachers to carry pepper spray and electro-muscular disruption devices, commonly known as Tasers.“Every second matters during a school shooting, but the unfortunate reality is that the closest police offices are often minutes away,” LaFave said. “We must look at all options to prevent school shootings and make sure our students and teachers are not sitting ducks when one breaks out. This plan gives teachers more than bookmarks and staplers to defend themselves.”Under the plan laid out in House Bills 6066-67, all teachers would be allowed to carry self-defense sprays and foams in the school at which they are employed. Teachers would be required to obtain a concealed pistol license and undergo specialized Taser training if they want to possess a Taser.“A school employee who is armed with pepper spray or a Taser has the potential to save countless lives by quickly and efficiently incapacitating the gunman,” LaFave said. “This is a simple plan that offers non-lethal options many teachers will feel comfortable using.”LaFave said school districts will have the option to ban the items on school property, if administrators so choose.The legislation was referred to the House Judiciary Committee for consideration.###last_img read more

Michelle Obamas Silent Statement on Womens Rights

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 Shares Everett Collection / Shutterstock.comJanuary 28, 2015;Chicago TribuneTo be fair to Laura Bush, Hillary Clinton, and even Condoleezza Rice—the latter joining the official delegation to Riyadh to honor the passing of King Abdullah and acknowledge the accession of King Salman—Michelle Obama wasn’t the first recent woman dignitary to visit the rulers of Saudi Arabia without donning a headscarf. What was interesting was watching CNN’s repeated showings of video of Saudi dignitaries shaking President Obama’s hand while passing the First Lady by without a handshake, sometimes with nary a glance of acknowledgement. Her facial expression was priceless.One gets the sense that Michelle Obama doesn’t suffer indignities well, and good for her. Sometimes the greater latitude available to the person who doesn’t happen to be the POTUS means the First Lady comes off much better than the First Gentleman. That may explain why in administrations past, Laura Bush, Barbara Bush, and even Rosalynn Carter were frequently viewed much more positively than their husbands.Wearing a headscarf is not required for Western women visiting Saudi Arabia, though many do so out of respect for the customs and culture of the nation. There were suggestions both in Saudi Arabia and in the U.S. that the First Lady should have covered her head as a sentiment consistent with this administration’s (and its predecessor’s) call for respecting rather than denigrating Islamic culture. Unlike local women who forego the headscarf, Ms. Obama and other western women won’t be picked up by the mutaween, the police who enforce Saudi Arabia’s strict religious codes. But it got attention, to be sure, even with charges and Saudi denials that Saudi TV blurred the image of the First Lady.The Washington Post’s Nia-Malika Henderson declared Michelle Obama’s decision not to wear a headscarf “a bold political statement” and added comments from two of her predecessors:“In 1995, Hillary Rodham Clinton told an audience at the United Nation’s Women’s Conference in Beijing, ‘Women’s rights are human rights, and human rights are women’s rights.’”“Ten years later, at the World Economic Forum in Jordan in 2005, Laura Bush also emphasized women’s rights before a group of Arab leaders. She said: ‘Freedom, especially freedom for women, is more than the absence of oppression. It’s the right to speak and vote and worship freely. Human rights require the rights of women. And human rights are empty promises without human liberty.’”Henderson noted that Laura Bush recalled the Saudi delegation walking out of the WEF gathering before she got to those lines.Oddly, just before landing in Saudi Arabia, President Obama spoke in Delhi to an audience of college students and made it clear that he was willing to boldly challenge India, where incidents of abuse and rape have been recently well publicized, on issues of women’s equality:“‘We know from experience that nations are more successful when their women are successful,’ said Obama. ‘These are facts. So if nations really want to succeed in today’s global economy, they can’t simply ignore the talents of half of their people.’“‘Every daughter deserves the same chance as our sons,’ he added. ‘And every woman should be able to go about her day—to walk the street, or ride the bus—and be safe and be treated with the respect and dignity that she deserves.’”One can only hope that in addition to her powerful visual statement, the First Lady also got to tell someone in authority that they should cease the flogging and jail punishment of blogger Raif Badawi, whose crime, it appears, was openness to religious tolerance. Especially because in the same speech he made in India about gender equality, President Obama said this about religious tolerance:“The peace we seek in the world begins in human hearts; it finds its glorious expression when we look beyond any differences in religion or tribe and rejoice in the beauty of every soul,” the president said. At the conclusion of his speech, President Obama referenced Mohandas Gandhi: “He said, ‘for me, the different religions are beautiful flowers from the same garden, or they are branches of the same majestic tree’. Branches of the same majestic tree.”Let’s see if, in the heart of someone in the leadership of Saudi Arabia, there is the will to cease the punishment of the young blogger and set him free.—Rick CohenShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more