The Oldest Boy, Starring Celia Keenan-Bolger, Opens Off-Broadway

first_imgThe world premiere of Sarah Ruhl’s The Oldest Boy, starring three-time Tony nominee Celia Keenan-Bolger and James Yaegashi, officially opens off-Broadway on November 3. The production, directed by Rebecca Taichman, is playing at Lincoln Center’s Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater. In The Oldest Boy, Tenzin, the toddler son of an American woman (Keenan-Bolger) and a Tibetan man (Yaegashi), is recognized as the reincarnation of a high Buddhist teacher. Differing cultures contend with competing ideas of faith and love when two monks seek permission to take Tenzin to a monastery in India to begin his training as a spiritual master. His parents must decide whether to send their young son away or keep him home. In addition to Keenan-Bolger and Yaegashi, the cast of The Oldest Boy includes Ernest Abuba, Tsering Dorjee, Takemi Kitamura, James Saito, Jon Norman Schneider and Nami Yamamoto. The Oldest Boy Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 28, 2014 Related Shows View Commentslast_img read more

“Vermont in Transition: Social, Economic and Environmental Trends” released today

first_imgAs Vermont is poised to make major financial decisions with far reaching policy implications, new research may prove instrumental in shaping the discussions. The Council on the Future of Vermont and St. Michael s College just published Vermont in Transition: Social, Economic and Environmental Trends, a comprehensive study of the major trends that are impacting life in the state. Over 300 graphs are included in this 150 page research book which documents and explains the key transitions that have occurred in Vermont in areas as diverse as education, the economy, agriculture, demography, crime, energy, climate and civic engagement. The study was commissioned by the nonpartisan Vermont Council on Rural Development as a facet of its two-year Council on the Future of Vermont program. This report is important for legislators, reporters, community leaders, advocates, philanthropists, and any citizen who wants to better understand the Green Mountain State. It provides critical data that will help decision makers as they plan ahead, explains CFV Program Manager Sarah Waring. The research, along with polling, public forums and listening sessions are helping to build a comprehensive picture of the aspirations of today s Vermonters and the place they would like our state to be in the future. The Council releases its final findings this spring.To look back at trends over time, The Council on the Future of Vermont (CFV) partnered with the well-respected Saint Michael s College Center for Social Science Research and Drs. Vince Bolduc and Herb Kessel. The project drew upon the work of analysts in federal and state government, other educational institutions, the non-profit sector, and the business community, including sources such as the Vermont Economy newsletter, the Congressional Quarterly, the Vermont Campaign to End Childhood Hunger, and the Vermont Land Trust. This joint writing effort combines the expertise of sociologists, economists, biologists, physicists, and other specialists. This project is unique in many ways, says Dr. Bolduc, who teaches Sociology at St. Michael s College. It is holistic in its broad spectrum of subjects covered; historical in its focus on change over time; quantitative in its reliance on objective data, and it presents each topic in the context of regional or national developments.Dr. Kessel, a professor of Economics, noted The project brings together in a single document well over 300 charts and tables, which provided the basis for us to identify 160 of the most important trends in Vermont. When historians try to understand what life was like in Vermont at the turn of the millennium, we hope that they will turn to our study and the broader one being prepared by the Council on the Future of Vermont.Vermont in Transition is available online for free at www.futureofvermont.org(link is external), or by calling 802-223-6091 to request a hard copy. The Council on the Future of Vermont is a project of the Vermont Council on Rural Development through a special partnership with the Vermont Community Foundation.last_img read more

Is anybody out there?

first_imgIt may be a cliché, but that doesn’t make it any less true: It is lonely at the top. A sense of isolation isn’t just an issue for newly ascendant CEOs whose relationships with their pre-promotion peers have changed. Longtime executives without a network of supportive colleagues or unable to stay connected to those they are tasked with leading face this challenge as well.An advancement that puts someone in charge of his or her former “equals” can spark an array of interpersonal challenges, says Susanne Biro, master coach and co-founder of Syntrina Leadership LLC, Indianapolis, a boutique leadership development firm specializing in working with senior-level leaders and their teams. Perhaps a former peer (or even several) coveted the position, Biro posits, causing resentment, disappointment and jealously towards the one chosen—emotions that can undermine support for the new leader. Or they might have wanted another person to receive the promotion, resulting in the same problematic attitudes. Trying to keep things as they were before the promotion can also cause problems.“Leaders and peers might try to remain friends and fail to recognize the need for a new relationship with new boundaries of what can be discussed, with whom, how and when,” Biro explains. “This can be extremely subtle, but the results can be large.”The speed at which a promotion happens can also contribute to interpersonal issues, says Deedee Myers, Ph.D., CEO of CUESolutions provider DDJ Myers Ltd., a Phoenix-based firm providing executive search/recruitment, strategic organization and leadership consulting services. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Growing pains

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Hector Bellerin will only sign new Arsenal deal if Mikel Arteta delivers on improvement

first_img Comment Coral BarrySunday 31 May 2020 12:46 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.9kShares Advertisement Advertisement Hector Bellerin will only sign new Arsenal deal if Mikel Arteta delivers on improvement Bellerin has been at Arsenal since he was 16 (Picture: Getty)Hector Bellerin remains committed to Arsenal, but will reportedly only sign a new long-term deal if he sees sustained improvement in performances.Mikel Arteta has been tasked with rejuvenating Arsenal and Bellerin is considered a vital figure in the squad as one of the longest serving players at the club.Bellerin has repeatedly been linked with moves away from Arsenal with Serie A duo Inter Milan and Juventus the latest clubs to be eyeing up a move for the right-back.ESPN claim Bellerin is not thinking about a move at the moment and has three years left on his deal.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTBellerin is completely onboard with Arteta’s vision for the future, but wants to see the targeted improvement on the pitch and in results.Arsenal are ninth in the Premier League table ahead of the restart of the 2019/20 season and appear set to miss out on Champions League football again.Bellerin penned a six-and-a-half year deal in 2016, but he will only agree to sign another long-term contract if Arteta delivers on his promises. Bellerin has three years left on his deal (Picture: Getty)The first-team squad will get a 12.5 per cent pay cut if they fail to qualify for the Champions League.As Arsenal’s Professional Footballers’ Association representative, Bellerin played a key role in convincing the squad to take a wage deduction amid the coronavirus pandemic.Bellerin is Arsenal’s second longest serving player having joined the Gunners youth academy as a 16-year-old in 2011. Arsenal players are gearing up for a return to action on 17 June when they will take on Manchester City.MORE: The astonishing total cost of David Luiz’s transfer from Chelsea to Arsenal revealedMORE: Dennis Bergkamp let’s Mikel Arteta know where he has been going wrong at ArsenalFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page.last_img read more