Senator-elect Tommy Tuberville flubs basics of the Constitution, World War II and the 2000 election.

first_imgAsked to opine on the key takeaways from the election, Mr. Tuberville said he was concerned that Mr. Biden, a mainstream, centrist Democrat, had promoted a vision that he claimed “leads more to a socialist type of government.”“That’s concerning to me, that we’re to the point now where we’ve got almost half the country voting for something that this country wasn’t built on,” Mr. Tuberville said. “I tell people, my dad fought 76 years ago in Europe to free Europe of socialism.”World War II was a global battle against fascism.- Advertisement – Mr. Tuberville also said he planned to use his Senate office to raise money for two Republican senators in Georgia who are facing runoff elections that will determine control of the chamber. Senate ethics rules bar the use of official resources for campaign purposes.And in another exchange, he erroneously said that Mr. Gore, the Democratic presidential nominee in 2000, was president-elect for 30 days during an intense, protracted recount and legal battle. Neither Mr. Gore nor George W. Bush were considered the president-elect during that process. – Advertisement – Asked if he thought Republicans could still use their potential Senate majority to pass legislation in divided government, with Democrats controlling the White House and House of Representatives, Mr. Tuberville replied that he had been given a mandate to “help people,” adding, “I don’t care if you’re a Republican or Democrat.”“Our government wasn’t set up for one group to have all three branches of government — wasn’t set up that way,” Mr. Tuberville said. “You know, the House, the Senate, and the executive.” The three branches of the federal government, as laid out in the Constitution, are the legislative, including both the House and Senate; the executive, or presidency; and judicial, which includes the Supreme Court.- Advertisement – The interview amounted to the most in-depth remarks Mr. Tuberville had given since he was elected last week. He cut a low profile on the campaign trail, rarely making himself available to reporters other than those at conservative outlets, but had positioned himself as a staunch supporter of President Trump. In his first big interview as a senator-elect, Tommy Tuberville, Republican of Alabama, misidentified the three branches of the federal government, claimed erroneously that World War II was a battle against socialism and wrongly asserted that former Vice President Al Gore was president-elect for 30 days.Mr. Tuberville, a former Auburn University football coach who decisively defeated Senator Doug Jones, a Democrat, last week, gave the remarkable interview to The Alabama Daily News on Thursday after attending orientation for new senators in Washington.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Pascal Pape: Facing Jamie Heaslip is not a problem

first_img France’s bullish lock was banned for 10 weeks for his crude challenge on Heaslip in Ireland’s 18-11 RBS Six Nations victory on Valentine’s Day. The 35-year-old may not play again in the Six Nations if he retires from Test rugby as planned after the World Cup, but will lock horns with Heaslip again in Sunday’s Pool D decider in Cardiff. Stade Francais second row Pape intends to focus on guiding France to a victory that would line up Argentina in the quarter-finals and leave Ireland facing New Zealand. “It’s not a concern for me, or for him probably,” said Pape when asked about renewing hostilities with Heaslip. “I don’t know how to take the question, it’s not important for me. It wasn’t a problem.” Pape pleaded guilty to the offence and had his ban reduced by five weeks for showing remorse, tweeting Heaslip to apologise. Leinster loose-forward Heaslip accepted the apology by responding to Pape on social media, showing humility despite a nasty injury. “I apologised, he accepted that and we moved on,” said Pape. “I’ll just work hard for the team. “There are plenty of engagements and collisions in matches. I expect fierce competition with lots of physicality but no problems.” France fly-half Frederic Michalak vowed not to fret too much about hounding Johnny Sexton, admitting he would let attack-dog flanker Thierry Dusautoir worry about that instead. Les Bleus have unashamedly placed a target on Sexton’s back this week for the third time in succession. Philippe Saint-Andre’s men know that to stop Sexton is to stop Ireland, and will again send freight-train centre Mathieu Bastareaud straight down his channel at the Millennium Stadium on Sunday. “He’s a great player, he’s had two years in France so I’ve played against him a number of times,” said Michalak of Sexton. “I’ll concentrate on the French team though, I can’t worry about him particularly – I’ll leave that to Thierry!” France will play their first World Cup match at the Millennium Stadium since their superlative 20-18 victory over New Zealand in the 2007 quarter-finals. The French clung on at the death with the All Blacks squandering numerous chances to drop for goal, desperate not just to win but to do so in style. Dusautoir scored a try and set a World Cup-record 38 tackles in a monumental shift in that last-eight battle, but downplayed any chances of a repeat performance against Ireland on Sunday. France have failed to beat Ireland in their last four meetings and even the inspirational Dusautoir admitted he would not put any big money on Saint-Andre’s men. “Eight years has passed since that great match here, so a lot has changed” said Dusautoir. “It’s not a quarter-final, it’s not the same, but it’s massively important for us. “We’ve got to front up to Ireland in order to succeed. We’ve got to play our best rugby to win but we can’t be thinking about repeating the past, it’s a different scenario. “It’s true that we haven’t beaten Ireland in four years but we had two draws, that I remember well. And the two defeats were very close. “I hope that tomorrow we will have the arguments to win the game. I wouldn’t gamble on the French team but I think we can change the story tomorrow on the pitch.” Pascal Pape remains unfazed by facing Jamie Heaslip for the first time since kneeing Ireland’s number eight in the back in a challenge inflicting fractured vertebrae. Press Associationlast_img read more