Under new management

first_imgThe city will earn $381,900 more in revenue over the three years than it did from Ventura, according to city documents. In addition to the $750,000 LEBA will pay the city, the company will also pay $20,000 to the county’s Department of Public Works for graffiti abatement. But Salcido said the City Council should expect much more from such a valuable piece of property. “The contract with LEBA is essentially a mirror image of the old one,” Salcido said. “Yes, the financial benefits are significantly more, however it’s not enough for 60 acres fronting the 605 \ Freeway.” Salcido said he favored tearing down the arena and starting from scratch. “It’s been a money pit for it’s entire existence,” he said “And it’s never fully benefitted the vast majority of residents. “I don’t personally know anyone who’s gone to an event at that place,” he added. pam.wight@sgnv.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3029160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Councilman Greg Salcido was the lone dissenter and Councilman David Armenta was absent. LEBA, Inc. had been subcontracted by Ventura for the past five years to book entertainment and currently has some events already scheduled up to a year from now, said spokesman Bob Spencer. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers owns the property but the city owns the Sports Arena, he said. Recent concern by the Army Corps over the condition of the site led to the termination of a lease with the Fiesta Swap Meet on the Arena grounds. “We tried to come up with a timeframe,” Beilke said. “We will commission a study of the possibilities that we can do with the property. We all agree we have a vision. We just need to decide, do we start from scratch or refurbish it. “That’s why we went with the 3-year lease,” he added. PICO RIVERA – A new 3-year contract for concessionaire services at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena will reportedly double the city’s annual revenue from what the previous vendor could earn, said officials. In a 3-1 vote at this week’s regular meeting, the Council approved a contract that will earn the city $750,000 over three years for LEBA, Inc. to run the 60-acre sports complex. The city’s 15-year contract with Ventura Productions – the previous vendor – will expire May 17. Mayor Ron Beilke and Council members Gracie Gallegos-Smith and Bob Archuleta voted for the new contract, saying the city can earn money while staff researched and initiated plans for the site during the three years. last_img read more

Life in a Day – on YouTube

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts curt hopkins Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… If you found those “Day in a Life” books fascinating, you may find YouTube’s latest experiment, Life in a Day, equally interesting. If on the other hand, you found them disappointingly insipid, this may not be your bag. Life in a Day is being marketed as a “user-generated feature film shot in a single day.” The creators are asking people around the world to upload their quotidian videos to a YouTube channel. The director, Kevin MacDonald (“The Last King of Scotland”), will cut it together.Produced by Ridley Scott, the director of “Black Hawk Down,” “Gladiator” and “Blade Runner,” the film is also planning to fold in video from cameras given to people (including NGO workers) in “remote” places. Presumably, all the video is supposed to have been shot on July 24. However, as a clock on the YouTube Channel indicates, contributors have until the end of the month to upload that video. Whose life is it anyway? One of the key issues with a project like this is how honest the filmmakers are about how much of their sensibilities and values inflect the project. The other is, simply put, how interesting it will be as a film. To these issues should probably be added the effect Google will have on the how and why of the film. Google, which owns YouTube, is deeply involved with its production. It’s difficult to say how hands-off a company when it has an opportunity to leave its fingerprints on a Ridley Scott movie. Merely by spearheading it and influencing its manner of gathering and distribution it’s already done a great deal of that.No, but seriously. A day in whose life? The film has been pre-accepted into the Sundance Film Festival. It has been reported that the contributors whose videos are used will not be paid, but the film will not be sold to a studio either. Instead, it will be available for viewing on YouTube. 20 contributors will be brought to the Sundance premiere, apparently.Frankly, it’s difficult to imagine how the film is going to capture an average day in anyone’s life, much less the whole of a day for everyone. Among the many elements that will inform the shape of the finished product are the following. It’s being produced by an action movie directorContributors are required to abide by YouTube’s TOSThe film has been pre-approved by one of the world’s leading money factories for new moviesIt looks like it will be larded with self-consciously authentic video from remote places*It seems more likely that a film about a specific time and definitely place by a single filmmaker might have a better chance of universality than a documentary about everyone by anyone. But we will, quite literally, see about that. Tags:#Real World#user-generated content#web *Just for the record: I’m reasonably certain that Namibia doesn’t seem remote to the folks in Windhoek. And G-d protect us from a Dreadlock J. Collegestudent’s paternalistic videos of Haiti or Cornelius Jamcrumpet III’s fearless footage of himself hugging the Mashantucket Pequots!last_img read more

25 TEDTalk Quotes to Inspire You

first_imgHave you ever attended live or viewed an online TEDTalk? You know, those inspiring, funny, or fascinating talks from industry leaders and amazing people that take place around the world? Today, the TED nonprofit, which began in 1984 as an annual conference that brought together people from the technology, entertainment, and design industries, has launched TED Quotes, a web page on the TED.com website dedicated to featuring some of the best quotes from its TEDTalks.It’s a brilliant move; who doesn’t love a good, insighful quote? We’ve been scouring the TED Quotes today and wanted to highlight some of our favorite ones from the technology, internet, management, and business categories. These quotes are easily tweetable and Facebook sharable via the TED website, and they can make great additions to your presentations and other marketing content. Enjoy!TED Technology Quotes1) Clay Shirky: Time Warner has called and they want us all back on the couch, just consuming — not producing, not sharing — and we should say, ‘No.’ Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)2) Ian Ritchie: [Tim Berners-Lee] told me about his proposed system called the ‘World Wide Web.’ And I thought, well, that’s got a pretentious name. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)3) Roger Ebert: Because of the rush of human knowledge, because of the digital revolution, I have a voice, and I do not need to scream. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)4) Evan Grant: Everything gives out some kind of data, whether it’s sound or smell or vibration. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)5) Aaron Koblin: An interface can be a powerful narrative device. And as we collect more and more personally and socially relevant data, we have an opportunity, and maybe even an obligation, to maintain [our] humanity and tell some amazing stories. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)6) Ze Frank: On street corners everywhere, people are looking at their cell phones, and it’s easy to dismiss this as some sort of bad trend in human culture. But the truth is life is being lived there. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)7) Nicholas Christakis: Social networks are these intricate things of beauty, and they’re so elaborate and so complex and so ubiquitous that one has to ask what purpose they serve. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)8) John Underkoffler: That’s the old way, that’s the old mantra: one machine, one human, one mouse, one screen. Well, that doesn’t really cut it anymore. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)9) David Agus Quoting Andy Grove: No technology will win. Technology itself will win. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)TED Internet Quotes10) Clay Shirky: We are in a world where most American citizens over the age of 12 share things with each other online. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)11) Joe Sabia: In 6,000 years of storytelling, [people have] gone from depicting hunting on cave walls to depicting Shakespeare on Facebook walls. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)12) Adam Ostrow: By the end of this year, there’ll be nearly a billion people on this planet that actively use social networking sites. The one thing that all of them have in common is that they’re going to die. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)13) Eli Pariser: Facebook was looking at which links I clicked on, and it was noticing that I was clicking more on my liberal friends’ links than on my conservative friends’ links. And without consulting me about it, it had edited them out. They disappeared. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)14) Eli Pariser: In a broadcast society, there were these gatekeepers, the editors, and they controlled the flows of information. Along came the Internet and it swept them out of the way, and it allowed all of us to connect together, and it was awesome. But that’s not actually what’s happening right now. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)15) Eli Pariser: Your filter bubble is your own personal, unique universe of information that you live in online. What’s in your filter bubble depends on who you are, and it depends on what you do. But you don’t decide what gets in — and more importantly, you don’t see what gets edited out. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)16) David McCandless: Data is the new soil, because for me, it feels like a fertile, creative medium. Over the years, online, we’ve laid down a huge amount of information and data, and we irrigate it with networks and connectivity, and it’s been worked and tilled by unpaid workers and governments. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)17) Stephen Lawler: We’re so constrained by browsing the Web, remembering URLs, saving favorites. As we move to search, we rely on the relevance rankings, the Web matching, the index crawling. But we want to use our brain! We want to navigate, explore, discover information. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)TED Management Quotes18) Stanley McChrystal: Leaders can let you fail and yet not let you be a failure. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)19) Elizabeth Lesser: Don’t persuade, defend or interrupt. Be curious, be conversational, be real. And listen. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)20) Jason Fried: [Facebook and Twitter] aren’t the real problems in the office. The real problems are what I like to call the M&Ms, the Managers and the Meetings. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)21) R.A. Mashelkar: An innovator is one who does not know it cannot be done. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)22) Simon Sinek: If you hire people just because they can do a job, they’ll work for your money. But if you hire people who believe what you believe, they’ll work for you with blood and sweat and tears. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)TED Business Quotes23) Jacek Utko: There is no reason — no practical reason — for newspapers to survive Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)24) Tim Harford: Ten percent of American businesses disappear every year. … It’s far higher than the failure rate of, say, Americans. Ten percent of Americans don’t disappear every year. Which leads us to conclude American businesses fail faster than Americans, and therefore American businesses are evolving faster than Americans. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)25) Lisa Gansky: A brand is a voice and a product is a souvenir. Tweet This! (Watch the TEDTalk)Which TEDTalk quote inspires you the most? Topics: Marketing Experts Originally published Feb 14, 2012 5:00:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Never Heard of ‘Graymail’? Here’s What You Need to Know

first_img Topics: You may know it as ham. Or bacon (spelled ‘bacn’). I guess email marketers have a penchant for meat products.Most people, however, just call it graymail.Never heard of it? I hadn’t either, until a coworker casually dropped it in conversation and left me with a few dozen follow-up questions. Here’s what I learned.What is graymail?Graymail is email you opted in to receive, but don’t really want.For instance, you know when you go shopping, buy a few things, and during the checkout process someone asks you for your email address so they can send you deals? The subsequent emails you get from them are often a type of graymail. You technically opted in to receive those emails, but most people grow weary of them and don’t engage with them.ISPs know these messages are graymail based on recipient engagement — or lack thereof. So if you open an email from a retailer — and then never open or engage with their subsequent 50 or so emails — it’s a good sign that it’s graymail.Over time, ISPs learn what you consider graymail based on your actions — and the actions of all recipients across email sent from that domain — so it gets smarter with categorization.What isn’t graymail?Again, graymail isn’t spam. It’s content that’s perceived as spam-like, in that recipients often don’t want the email and may mark it as spam out of annoyance — but it doesn’t meet the legal definition of spam.It’s also not the same as graylisting, a term you may have heard a few times. Graylisting refers to the idea that ISPs might not deliver an entire batch of mail all at once if they don’t trust your IP. So let’s say you just got a new dedicated IP and want to send out 100,000 emails — they might accept some of those emails, graylist the others, and send the remainder when they know it’s safe to deliver messages from you.Graymail and graylisting, however, aren’t directly related — they just both have gray in the name.Where does graymail go?So you’ve got all this graymail out there — where does it go?A lot of companies have come up with products specifically to address graymail. That’s what Gmail’s Priority Inbox is, for instance. Hotmail actually helped coin the graymail term and created a product to address it, as well.If your message is identified as graymail, it will likely get routed to one of the graymail products — like your Promotions folder, for instance. So it got delivered … but it might not get seen.How does graymail affect email marketers?Graymail is another reason to do what good email marketers already do: focus on segmentation, personalization, and engagement. You should:Use post-send engagement data to develop a strategy for combatting the prospect that graymail might route your messages into other inbox tabs and folders.Test your email send frequency.Develop re-engagement campaigns for contacts who have stopped engaging with your messages.Work to always improve your segmentation rules so you can send more personalized, relevant content that recipients will take time out of their day to seek out and readIn that way, graymail’s actually great for email marketers — because it sets aside marketing emails for a time when recipients are in the mood to be marketed to. And when they’re in the mood and have the time to consume marketing emails, they have all of those messages at their fingertips. It’s a better experience for the recipient and, thus, a better result for the marketer. Originally published Feb 13, 2014 11:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Email Deliverability Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

How to Write a Blog Post Outline: A Simple Formula to Follow

first_imgHow to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow to choose the right imageCreating it on your own Finding images to use legally Optimizing the image for TwitterSizing images for TwitterTagging people in imagesUsing Photo Collages Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhat results they should expect to get How to Write a Blog Post How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow long their tweet should be with the image in itHow to actually upload an image to Twitter (This is a pretty basic step that someone would already know if they’re reading this post.)What sizes they need to make imagesHow they can create images on their ownWhere they can find images to use legally What sets a good image apart from a bad one on TwitterShould you tag people in imagesShould you use photo collagesWhat colors you should use to stand out (Don’t believe there’s hard data on this, just speculation. Let’s cut it.) 4) Add more takeaways to some sections. At this point, you should have a pretty weird looking outline. Mine is. Some sections have lots of little bullet points, others have only a few, and others have nothing. Now’s the time to fill in the holes. What did you miss in your initial brainstorm? Thinking about what’s missing is always hard, but it will help improve your final post significantly. Don’t forget to beef up your intro here, too. Have a great point you think would set the stage for the article? Add a little reminder below that section so you don’t forget it. Below shows how my outline’s evolved. I italicized all the things I added, and the outline is becoming closer and closer to being a post:IntroImages work really well on Twitter (find study) Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhich metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust your strategy to get better results How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow to choose the right imageCreating it on your own Finding images to use legally Optimizing the image for TwitterSizing images for TwitterTagging people in imagesUsing Photo Collageshttp://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/twitter-photo-collages-ideas-list  Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow they can generate a lead on TwitterHow often they should tweet images Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhat results they should expect to get (The study in the first part should cover this bullet point.)Which metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust the above to get better results Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow to generate a lead on TwitterHow lead generation fits in with the rest of your Twitter strategy How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow to choose the right imageCreating it on your own Finding images to use legally Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhat results they should expect to getWhich metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust the above to get better results Optimizing the rest of your tweetHow long the tweet should be with the image in Optimizing the rest of your tweetHow long the tweet should be with the image in Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow to generate a lead on TwitterHow lead generation fits in with the rest of your Twitter strategyReference Anchorman line: “Come and see how good I look.” 7) If any details come to you that you don’t want to forget, add them in. Last, but certainly not least, spruce up the outline with anything you don’t want to forget while writing. Maybe you’re writing the post right away — or maybe you won’t have time to actually start for a few more days. Regardless, having these details in your outline will make sure you’re not missing a thing. I do this often if I think of a terrible pun or pop culture reference while outlining … and trust me, that’s something I definitely wouldn’t want to forget. ;)Here’s my final outline: IntroImages tend to work really well on Twitter (http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/tweet-images-improve-lead-gen-ht)center_img Topics: Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow to generate a lead on TwitterHow lead generation fits in with the rest of your Twitter strategy Optimizing the image for TwitterSizing images for TwitterTagging people in imagesUsing Photo Collageshttp://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/twitter-photo-collages-ideas-list  Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhich metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust your strategy to get better results Measuring Your Strategy’s SuccessWhich metrics to look atHow to find them in your analyticsHow to adjust your strategy to get better results How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow long their tweet should be with the image in itHow to actually upload an image to TwitterWhat sizes they need to make imagesHow they can create images on their ownWhere they can find images to use legally What sets a good image apart from a bad one on TwitterShould you tag people in imagesShould you use photo collagesWhat colors you should use to stand out Optimizing the rest of your tweetHow long the tweet should be with the image in What makes a blog post bad?There are lots of reasons a blog post could be less-than-perfect. Poor formatting. Poor grammar. Poor word choice. Poor shareability. The most pervasive problem? Poor flow. The post jumps from one idea to the next to the next and then circles around again for a split second to the first idea, then back to the fourth, and so on. Or the post reads like a stream of consciousness — but it wasn’t a stylistic choice. Luckily, you have a simple solution. Before diving headfirst into writing your post, you can create an outline. I’m not talking about jotting down a few quick bullet points — even experienced writers can go astray with just a few talking points. I’m talking a fully fleshed-out outline with enough details that make it virtually impossible for your writing to go off the deep end. And it’s pretty easy to do.Download Now: 6 Free Blog Post TemplatesBelow is my method for outlining posts and organizing my thoughts. You may prefer to switch up some of the steps depending on your writing style, but your end goal should always be to get an outline detailed enough that its result is a cohesive, logical piece. Here’s one way you can do that. 1) Nail your working title.This is the most important step of this entire process. You want to have a clear understanding of what you’re going to write before you start outlining. My colleague Corey wrote an awesome post about how to pick a great working title. Go read it, now. I won’t go too much into the weeds here (that’s why you should read her post), but a great working title is specific. It’s “How to Use Images to Generate Leads on Twitter,” not ” Twitter lead generation.”Spend time getting your working title to something specific and easy to tackle in a blog post format — but don’t waste time getting nitpicky. You can refine your title later. The goal here is to have a title that gives you a very clear idea of what the whole piece is about. You can make it sound catchy later.  2) Write down as many distinct takeaways from the article as you can.Next, you get to brain dump. Write down all the things you want your readers to get out of the article. These won’t always be the main sections of your article — it’s just all the things you want your readers to know by the end of reading your post.This is the only time in the whole process you’re not worried about organization — just let your ideas flow naturally. You need to get out all of your wild and crazy ideas now so they won’t muck up your post later in the process.Let’s use the previous example to show you what I mean. If my working title was “How to Use Images to Generate Leads on Twitter,” I’d probably want readers to know:What sets a good image apart from a bad one on TwitterWhere they can find images to use legally How they can create images on their ownWhat sizes they need to make imagesHow often they should tweet imagesHow to actually upload an image to TwitterHow they can generate a lead on TwitterHow long their tweet should be with the image in itWhat results they should expect to get Notice how these are really unfiltered and all over the place. That’s okay. We’ll wrangle it all in in the next step.3) Break up those takeaways into larger sections.Now, we’ll take that jumble of ideas and place them into overarching sections. Think of it like sorting laundry — each thought belongs to a different pile. From your brainstorm, you should come up with a few big themes. Sometimes, one of your brainstorming bullets will be a theme in itself, but usually several bullets will fall under one overarching theme. You may also realize that there’s a theme that you may not have any bullets for, but the post definitely calls for it. Lots of people recommend sticking to 3-4 larger sections, but it really depends on what type of post you’re writing. If you’re writing something that’s long and comprehensive, you might need more. If it’s a quick post, fewer sections would be ideal. But if you need a benchmark, 3-4 sections are fine. So if we’re writing that post about generating leads on Twitter using images, we’d bucket my ideas into the following buckets:IntroCrafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow they can generate a lead on TwitterHow often they should tweet images Crafting a Twitter Image Lead Gen StrategyHow to generate a lead on TwitterHow often they should tweet images Essentially, you’re re-doing the second step, but in a more controlled, organized manner.5) Revise, remove, and reorganize details in each section.Now comes the fun part: editing your outline. You’ve already done the hard part of actually thinking of your ideas. Now, you’re tightening up your outline to include only the most relevant information, revising the sub-bullets to actually make sense, and reorganizing the sub-bullets to tell the most logical story.First, let me show you what I’d cut — shown in bold. IntroImages work really well on Twitter (find study) How to Create the Perfect Lead Gen TweetHow long their tweet should be with the image in itHow to actually upload an image to TwitterWhat sizes they need to make imagesHow they can create images on their ownWhere they can find images to use legally What sets a good image apart from a bad one on Twitter And that’s it! Once you have a solid outline, writing the actual post should be a breeze. Do you outline your posts before writing? What else do you include? Originally published May 5, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Ta-da! A much more comprehensive outline that makes your post easy to write.6) Include links to your examples and/or data.This is purely a time-saving trick. After you’ve fully fleshed out and then trimmed your outline, you should look for examples and data to support these claims. Once you find a source to support your arguments, just add them as a note underneath the section — that way, when you go to write it, it’s all organized for you.  Here’s what my outline morphed into. I grabbed the link for the Twitter study I wanted to reference in the intro and added a reference to an article we’ve written on Twitter collages.IntroImages tend to work really well on Twitter (http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/tweet-images-improve-lead-gen-ht) I cut things usually because the sub-bullet didn’t add value to the post or the reader would already know it. That’s a pretty good benchmark to remember if you’re not sure whether to cut something. Next, we’ll reorganize the remainder of the sub-bullets and rework them to sound like actual takeaways. We’ll also turn some of the sub-bullets into sub-sub-bullets. Here’s what this outline looks like now:IntroImages tend to work really well on Twitter (find study)last_img read more

How to Easily Write Better Emails [Infographic]

first_img Email Marketing Topics: 235Save Originally published Feb 20, 2015 12:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Email has become the primary way most of us communicate in the business world — so much so that it often replaces face-to-face interactions. Just think about how many people you’ve emailed, but never actually met.This is especially common for marketers today. For example, as a blogger who manages contributors, sets up interviews, and coordinates across teams, I send a lot of emails to people who’ve never met me. To them, my emails are their first (and second, and third) impressions of me. How I address them, the way I word a request, and even my email address affects that impression.The same is true for marketing emails. Whether recipients are long-time customers or brand new blog subscribers, each and every email you send makes an impression and shapes the way they’ll think of you and interact with you in the future.So, given the chance to learn how to write better emails, wouldn’t you take it? Check out the infographic below from WhoIsHostingThis.com for ways to craft compelling emails so you can build better relationships with your customers and prospects.235Save last_img read more

Why People Leave Your Company [Infographic]

first_img390Save Office Space Every company deals with employee turnover. Even in a healthy economic climate, it’s inevitable that some of your people will seek a career change, move cities, get recruited by a competitor, or part ways with your company. But there’s a difference between healthy and unhealthy employee turnover. You want your best hires to stay and grow their careers at your company — and if they’re leaving, you need to find out why. What makes great people leave their jobs?The folks at BambooHR wanted to find out what’s driving employees away from companies and keeping current employees disengaged at work. They conducted a survey of over 1,000 current employees in the U.S. to find out what annoys them at work, what’s decreasing their productivity, and what the breaking point would be that’d make them leave.Check out the results of BambooHR’s survey in the infographic below to learn the top five deal-breakers broken down by age and gender, why people leave their jobs, what annoys employees, and more. (And read this blog post to learn more about why employees quit.)390Save Topics:center_img Originally published Sep 15, 2015 6:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

TOUCH SA STATE LEAGUE GRAND FINALS

first_imgWith Touch SA’s State League reaching completion this weekend, Jeremy Smith has provided ATA with his overview to the conclusion of SA’s premiere Touch competition… Mens Elimination Final 1 Wolves 6 def Scorpions 3 The Scorpions were never really in the match, despite having beaten the Wolves all season, the Scorpions fortunes have taken a dramatic tumble in the last few minor round games. Down 3-0 after the first 10 minutes, it was always a question of what the final winning score would be for the Wolves. The Scorpions fought hard but the Wolves held them at bay to go on to record a 6-3 victory. Qualifying Final Vipers 4 def Stingrays 3 With the Vipers up 1-0 at half time and the rain starting to fall quickly afterwards, it looked likely to be a low scoring finish. After scoring twice in a row to take it out to 3-0, it looked like the Vipers were home. However, the Stingrays rallied, bringing it back to 3-3 with some spectacular play, an inspirational touchdown by coach Peter Robbel leveling the scores. Just when it seemed the Stingrays would go on to finish all over the top of the Vipers, a spectacular touchdown to Tom Ainslie who literally fell on top of a stray pass, gave the Vipers a nail-biting 4-3 victory and a chance to win back to back winter State League Championship title. Preliminary Final Stingrays 10 def Wolves 4 The Wolves were simply outclassed and outgunned in this final. It was all over at halftime with the Wolves down to seven fit players for the match and trailing 6-2. Despite an early rally which saw the Wolves climb back to 6-4, the Stingrays simply ran away with the game in the last ten minutes, going on to a 10-4 victory. Starring for the Stingrays was Rob Page who collected four touchdowns. Womens Elimination Final Scorpions 5 def Vipers 4 In one of the most entertaining matches seen all season, it was the Scorpions who strung together their third win in a row, in a match that went to extra time. The scores were locked at 4-all just before full-time, and a last attacking play by the Vipers saw Kat Bradshaw go ever so close to scoring in the corner only to be touched by a desperate dive by former Viper Tracey Firth. Firth proved to be the star in extra time as well, as the teams got down to 3 on 3 before the Scorpions scored the `golden’ touchdown. Qualifying Final Stingrays 5 def Wolves 2 The Stingrays were a class above the Wolves all match and it showed with a comfortable win. Without playmakers Amelia Kent and Kate Lewicki, the Wolves hardly threatened the Stingrays who strolled into their second consecutive grand final. Preliminary Final Scorpions 6 def Wolves 5 The Wolves had earnt the double chance by finishing second and came into this match determined to earn another crack at the Stingrays. But the Scorpions were on an impressive three game winning streak and looking to make it four. It was a tight match throughout with the Scorpions grabbing an early lead before a Wolves fightback saw them come close. However, it was the Scorpions who prevailed, making it four wins from their last four starts and a shot at the Stingrays in the grand final. Grand Final Preview MENS The two form sides of the men’s competition have made it through to the Grand Final, meaning spectators should be in for a treat this Friday night. The Stingrays seemed to fade after winning their first four in a row, which included two victories against the Vipers. However, a 10-4 win over the Wolves in the preliminary final and a fighting loss to the Vipers in the Qualifying final should see them at full confidence and perhaps peaking at the right moment. The Vipers have been playing to their potential for the last four weeks or so and the only question is whether they will be able to keep it up come Friday night. With a tight qualifying final win over the Stingrays and two wins from two in their previous matches against the Stingrays, expect the Vipers to go in chock full of confidence. My tip is the Vipers by 3. Players to Watch Rob Page (Stingrays) Jason McNamara (Vipers) Previous Results R1 Stingrays 4 Vipers 3 R4 Stingrays 5 Vipers 4 R7 Vipers 7 Stingrays 5 WOMENS: The Womens Grand Final will no doubt be a thriller. This is the first time the Scorpions girls have made it to a grand final showdown for the past two years and they are doing so on the back of a four game winning streak. Their confidence will be high, not only from their winning streak but also from the fact they have beaten their grand final opponents twice already this season. On the other side of the ledger, the Stingrays have been the form team of the competition this season, having won seven out of nine matches, with their only losses coming at the hands of the Scorpions. They looked a polished unit last Friday night and it will be interesting to see how they back up after the game off. This one’s too tight to call, however I’m going to put my money on the Stingrays by 2. Players to Watch Tracey Firth (Scorpions) Carrie Atkinson (Stingrays) Previous Results R2 Scorpions 7 Stingrays 5 R5 Stingrays 5 Scorpions 3 R8 Scorpions 6 Stingrays 4 Written by Jeremy Smith, Touch SA. Keep an eye on the ATA website next week for the wrap up of Touch SA’s State League grand finals.last_img

Benji heads to Rockhamption

first_imgFOR all the touch footy fanatics out there, brace yourselves.NRL star Benji Marshall will be crashing the grounds of the Cyril Connell Fields this weekend to play his first love in sport, touch football.The Tigers halfback will join the open Australian Men’s and Women’s touch football teams for a two-day event that will see a junior coaching clinic and a few games with Rockhampton’s best players.From 2.30pm on Saturday Benji Marshal will join forces with the Rockhampton Men’s Invitational side when they play against the fury of the Australian men’s side.“Benji originally played touch and it was his first sport, he still plays it at high levels and loves it,” organiser Gavin Shuker said.But Marshall isn’t the only player who will get the locals pumped.Rockhampton’s Daniel Withers, who also plays for the Australia Men’s team, will be caught in the middle of the battle when he plays games for both his hometown team, Rockhampton, and the Australian side.“It is going to be different (playing against Rockhampton) as a lot of the players are my good mates,” Withers said.But the Australian Men’s team will also have a strong force to reckon with when they face CQ Indigenous All Stars Touch Team.“The indigenous side has a lot of skill and a lot of speed. They definitely will be playing with an attack and flamboyant style,” Withers said.“They will chuck the ball around and are not scared to have a crack, which should make it a good game when they roll in.”The Rockhampton Women’s Invitational team also will step up and give the Australian Women’s side a good run after the Australian teams have their training camp tomorrow.Rockhampton Touch Football administrator Denise Edwards said local touch football youngsters were also able to get among the action with the junior coaching clinic on Saturday morning.All Australian representitives and Benji Marshall will be at the coaching clinic to teach the young players the tricks of the trade.“In the junior clinic we will teach them skills and coach them, they are the future of the sport,” Withers said.For more information on the coaching clinic call Denise Edwards on 0409631633.Thankyou to The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton) for the story.last_img read more

How to Start a Website for Your Organization

first_imgYour nonprofit organization needs to have a website. Period. It need not be flashy, overly colorful or even all that pretty-it just has to do its job. Your organization’s website should provide doormats for the major types of visitors, have relevant and timely information, and provide interested parties with your contact information.But, where do you even start? After determining your budget, follow these five steps to create your new website:Register a domain name (at least one):Think about other websites you’ve visited and other organizations you’ve searched for. The web address is straight-forward and relevant to the organization’s name and brand. People can’t visit your website if you don’t have a registered domain. You can get one free for a year through grassroots.org, or begin an inexpensive contract with godaddy.com. If your budget allows, you may consider purchasing more than one domain that all lead to your main webpage. For example, choose a common misspelling, reversal of words in your web address, etc.Develop the initial content for your website:What message or information do people visiting your site need to know? What are the goals of your website? Consider how you will incorporate your call-to-action (contact us, sign up for our listserv, make a donation, sign a petition), and who will be looking at your website. You may have an extremely varied audience-just make sure you’re providing information for each other: donation opportunities, background information and compelling storytelling of why people should care. Take into account the eight things your homepage must have.Determine if a free or really inexpensive option will work for you:Take some time to evaluate sites like Change.org and Grassroots.org. The former allows you to create your own branded social network (complete with online donation capabilities), and the latter has a free web-design/hosting service if you get on their list.Decide who will build your website (if step #3 doesn’t satisfy your organization’s needs, timing and/or format):There are a number of ways to create the page itself: outsourcing the work, creating a page in-house or finding an appropriate application provider (ASP). Read more about each of these options here.Allow your website to accept online donations:With all this “doormat” talk, it’s important to keep in mind that many donors will turn to your website for a quick way to get funds from their wallets to your organization. Network for Good offers an affordable, easy to use online fundraising solution.Once you have your website up and running, keep in mind that it’s an evolving tool and hub of information. Take some time to pat yourself on the back for getting it launched and donor-friendly/ready, but don’t forget to evaluate and re-evaluate how you can keep your site fresh and relevant.last_img read more